Karmatype / tags / web development

Tagged with “web development” (5)

  1. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  2. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  3. Top Add-Ons That Should be Integrated to EE « Episodes « EE Podcast

    The EE Podcast is a web design and development podcast focusing on technical discussions, interviews and insights about ExpressionEngine, EllisLab and the EE community. Hosted by Lea Alcantara and Emily Lewis.

    http://ee-podcast.com/episodes/top-add-ons-that-should-be-integrated-to-ee

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  4. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can’t link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  5. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype