Karmatype / tags / web

Tagged with “web” (28)

  1. Ethan Marcotte: Responsive Web Design Interview — The Way of Responsive Web Design | Design Interview

    Ethan Marcottee explains responsive web design. He also takes us through his own process to building a responsive site which includes applying media queries and designing for the mobile.

    http://www.dormroomtycoon.com/ethan-marcotte-responsive-web-design-interview-the-way-of-responsive-web-design-design-interview/

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  2. Jason Santa Maria - On Web Typography

    Achieving a thorough grasp of typography can take a lifetime, but moving beyond the basics is within your reach right now. In this talk, we’ll learn how to look at typefaces with a discerning eye, different approaches to typographic planning, how typography impacts the act of reading, and how to choose and combine appropriate typefaces from an aesthetic and technical point of view. Through an understanding of our design tools and how they relate to the web as a medium, we can empower ourselves to use type in meaningful and powerful ways.

    Ampersand is an affordable one-day event for knowledgable web designers & type enthusiasts, held in Brighton on 17 June 2011.

    http://ampersandconf.com/jason-santa-maria.php

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  3. HTML5 What It Is What It Isnt And Where It Might Go

    A talk at Sabre in Krakow, Poland about HTML5 myths, truths and what is around the corner for new web technology.

    http://www.archive.org/details/Html5101-WhatItIsWhatItIsntAndWhereItMightGo

    download

    Tagged with web

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  4. John Allsopp – The Dao of Web Design Revisited | Web Directions

    So, ten years later, what does John now think about his thesis, and his suggestions for developers?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/john-allsopp-the-dao-of-web-design-revisited/

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  5. Adactio: Articles—Of Time And The Network

    A presentation about history, networks, and digital preservation, from the Webstock conference held in Wellington, New Zealand in February 2012.

    Our perception and measurement of time has changed as our civilisation has evolved. That change has been driven by networks, from trade routes to the internet. Now that we have the real-time web allowing instantaneous global communication, there’s a danger that we may neglect our legacy for the future. While the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. But we can change that. This presentation will offer an alternative history of technology and a fresh perspective on the future that is ours to save.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5312/

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  6. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  7. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  8. Top Add-Ons That Should be Integrated to EE « Episodes « EE Podcast

    The EE Podcast is a web design and development podcast focusing on technical discussions, interviews and insights about ExpressionEngine, EllisLab and the EE community. Hosted by Lea Alcantara and Emily Lewis.

    http://ee-podcast.com/episodes/top-add-ons-that-should-be-integrated-to-ee

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  9. Closing Keynote: Beyond the Mobile Gold Rush

    The rise of smart devices like the iPhone and iPad has led to an application goldrush, with companies racing to stake their claim. In the early days we saw a few lucky pioneers strike gold, but like most gold rushes, the obvious targets were quickly depleted. Digital prospectors lured by the promise of gold are now arriving to find a very different market—one rife with competition and few obvious deposits to mine.

    Recent studies have shown that we tend to limit our usage to a few core applications and the bulk of apps never even get opened. So despite newspapers and magazines hailing the iPad as the saviour of the publishing industry, does it really make business sense to jump on the application bandwagon? If not, what are the alternatives?

    In this keynote, Andy Budd will look at the current state of the mobile web, how we got here and where we go next. He will explore the new opportunities that have opened up for the field of user experience design, but will caution that not every mobile experience needs to start with an app.

    http://www.iakonferenz.org/sessions/31

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  10. Andy Budd: Mastering web user experience

    Andy tells us the best practices to employ when building your site for your target audience. Also discover what it takes for your designs to stand out.

    http://www.dormroomtycoon.com/andy-budd/

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

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