Karmatype / tags / sxswi

Tagged with “sxswi” (18)

  1. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  2. Faster Design Decisions with Style Tiles

    With responsive design designers need to rethink the process they go through to work with clients and developers to create successful visual designs. Rather than creating traditional comps, style tiles are a deliverable that help you to communicate with your client, establish a visual language and work iteratively with developers. In this presentation, Samantha will explain how to reinvent your process to leverage Style Tiles as a deliverable.

    Samantha Warren is an experienced designer, speaker, and writer who leverages a diverse background in artistic mediums to create compelling and functional web experiences. Focused on designing for content, she is passionate about using the web as a vehicle to tell compelling stories while creating accessible user-experiences. She has been published in .net Magazine and has presented at various industry events, including Design Day in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania and the South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin Texas.

    Currently Samantha is the Design Director at Phase2 Technology where she uses her past experience working with brands like National Geographic and Choice Hotels International to help non-profits, publications, and associations tell their stories online.

    In her personal time she talks about design and the web on her blog, BadAssIdeas.com and spends time with her cross-eyed cat, Grace.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP10133

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  3. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  4. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  5. Connecting Interrelated Design and Development Workflows

    Design and development are like siblings in the creative process, constantly trying to express their individuality, but a lot closer than they’re willing to admit. This session will explore the interrelated disciplines of design and development by looking at three specific project types: designer/developer collaboration for the Flash Platform; designer/developer collaboration for Ajax; and cross-media design and publication. You’ll see how designers and developers can achieve peace through more efficient integration and collaboration across media types and disciplines. This panel is sponsored by Adobe.

    Ryan Stewart, Adobe

    Greg Rewis, Adobe

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  6. Career Renegade: How To Make A Great Living Doing What You Love

    Career Renegade is 288 pages of kick-ass, real-world, seriously actionable strategies, resources and case-studies that walk you through the process of building your career around the activities, settings and people that make you come alive. Steering clear of new-age, self-help fluff, this veritable renegade roadmap dives squarely into how to turn nearly any passion into real money (often online), build a powerhouse personal brand, rally the cynics to your cause and leverage your passion, knowledge and platform to make a great living doing what you love, even in this economy.

    Jonathan Fields, Career Renegade / Awake @ The Wheel

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  7. Social Media Marketing

    ‘Social Media Marketing’ is the start of a conversation about marketing communications using social media forms, including internet sites and mobile telecommunication sources. The book discusses the importance of data and analytics both in helping to monetize these media, and in improving the way that the owners of these media market themselves. Marketers wishing to communicate with customers, or potential customers via social media need to adopt a new set of skills and techniques to be effective. The need for dialogue and involvement, for engagement, is paramount. This book discusses solutions that allow marketers to target and measure their activities within social media.

    Alan Moore, Smlxl Ltd

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  8. HOWTO: 149 Surprising Ways to Turbocharge Your Blog With Credibility!

    John Gruber (DaringFireball.net) and Merlin Mann (43Folders.com) discuss the current state of blogging as a medium for creative expression, weighing the opportunities and challenges of building a thoughtful online presence in a world where everybody owns a printing press. They’ll consider the ascendance of Digg-friendly "problogs" and debate the subtler pleasures of careful writing that reaches smaller, but potentially less "profitable" audiences.

    John Gruber, Daring Fireball

    Merlin Mann, You Look Nice Today

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  9. The Seven Rules for Great Web Application Design

    In this lively and interactive session, Robert Hoekman, Jr., the author of ‘Designing the Obvious’ and ‘Designing the Moment’, uses the audience to reveal the 7 essential design principles for achieving great application design and the psychology behind them. And he does it all without a single bullet point (gasp!).

    Robert Hoekman Jr, Miskeeto LLC

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  10. Being a UX Team of One

    What’s the best way to evolve design ideas quickly? Get together with other designers and brainstorm. The second best way? Adapt the methods of larger UX groups to a team of one. Learn how in this presentation, which shares lightweight techniques for quick and effective brainstorming on your own.

    Leah Buley, Adaptive Path

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

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