Karmatype / tags / css

Tagged with “css” (4)

  1. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  2. With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility | Elliot Jay Stocks | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Recent developments in web technologies like HTML5 and CSS3 have allowed us to build a richer web, full of advanced visual treatments like web fonts, animations, transformations, and drop-shadows. But have we got carried away with our new toys? Just because we can use a drop-shadow doesn’t mean we have to. In this new and often controversial talk, Elliot looks at solid design principles that will turn a good website into a great website, examines the scenarios where it’s better to stay away from unnecessary visual effects, and attempts to find the sweet spot in between the two extremes. "With great power comes great responsibility," said Uncle Ben, and Spidey hadn’t even used border-radius!

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  3. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  4. Ethan Marcotte – The How and Why of Responsive Web Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    Ethan’s methods use media queries, fluid grids and other CSS3 elements to create beautiful and adaptable designs across a variety of platforms. Recently, he discussed his techniques during a UIE Virtual Seminar, The How and Why of Responsive Design. Ethan and Adam Churchill address some questions from that seminar in this podcast.

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype