JeremyCherfas / tags / history

Tagged with “history” (39)

  1. Promises, Promises: A History of Debt Omnibus part 2

    First broadcast on BBC R4 in 2016. Individual episodes previously huffduffed no longer have attached audio.

    Anthropologist David Graeber explores the history of debt from the use of virtual money in the medieval period and the rise of the slave trade, to the financial crash of 2008. He draws on his years of groundbreaking research to deliver a series that challenges established wisdom over the banking system, the moral power of debt and even the very definition of money itself.

    In this second episode, David takes us back to the medieval period when coinage largely disappeared and money become virtual. He reveals the importance of debt during the conquest of South America and the birth of the modern world economy.

    David goes on to explore the influence of debt during the birth of capitalism and the centrality of debt to the slave trade. The conventional view is that the innovations during the birth of capitalism led to greater material prosperity enabling us to lead happier lives. David argues that, in fact, these times were marked by extraordinary levels of war and violence. He goes on to examine the rise of virtual money since the 1970s and the power of international creditors such as the IMF.

    To conclude, David analyses the financial crash of 2008 and more recent debt crises in the context of the long history of debt. David argues that we are currently living in the early years of a new era in which physical money - cash passing from hand to hand - will be replaced by virtual money. There have been many eras of virtual money over the past 5000 years and David says we cannot yet know what this latest phase will mean as we are just a few decades years into a historical epoch likely to last 500 years.

    Presenter: David Graeber Producer: Max O’Brien A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  2. Promises, Promises: A History of Debt Omnibus part 1

    First broadcast on BBC R4 in 2016. Individual episodes previously huffduffed no longer have attached audio.

    Anthropologist David Graeber explores the history of debt and the peculiar moral hold that debt hold over us, from earliest financial transactions to the classical age.

    In this first episode, David draws upon his years of groundbreaking research to challenge established wisdom over the moral power of debt, the origins of money and even the definition of money itself (a remarkably contentious issue).

    David argues that whenever we think about debt we end up in a deep moral confusion. We resent the "deadbeats" who fail to pay us back and yet many of us believe that people who get us into debt - money lenders - are, at best, immoral.

    It turns out that debts have a very different meaning when there is a power imbalance between debtor and creditor. Normally, when a debt is between equals it can be renegotiated and even written off entirely. However when the creditor has all the power, debts transform into absolute imperatives that must be repaid, no matter what the cost.

    David goes on to explore the theology of debt. The Bible is peppered with the language of debt. Sin, forgiveness, reckoning, redemption - all of these words actually derive from the language of ancient finance. What’s more, this seems to be true in all the great religious traditions - not just Judaism and Christianity, but Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Islam - all of their texts are filled with financial metaphors, many of which relate to issues surrounding debt.

    To conclude, David examines debt in the Classical period. It was during this age that coinage first emerged as an efficient way of paying soldiers. He explains that the spread of coinage had enormous political and intellectual consequences.

    Presenter: David Graeber Producer: Max O’Brien A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  3. Tore C. Olsson, “Agrarian Crossings: Reformers and the Remaking of the US and Mexican Countryside” (Princeton UP, 2017) | New Books Network

    Tore C. Olsson‘s Agrarian Crossings: Reformers and the Remaking of the US and Mexican Countryside (Princeton University Press, 2017) tells a remarkable and under-appreciated story. It’s about how, in the 1930s and 40s, a group of reformers in the US and in Mexico undertook projects to transform the rural worlds…

    https://newbooksnetwork.com/tore-c-olsson-agrarian-crossings-reformers-and-the-remaking-of-the-us-and-mexican-countryside-princeton-up-2017/

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  4. Episode 011: Karima Moyer

    To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

    https://www.podbean.com/media/player/3g6i4-ad4780?from=yiiadmin&download=1&version=1This week, my talk with Karima Moyer, author of The Eternal Table, a culinary history of Rome from its founding to the present. We talk about how she ended up moving to Italy 30 years ago, how she ended up writing books about Italian culinary history after studying theatrical design and dramaturgy, and what it’s like to still be treated like an immigrant after such a long time living there. If you’re interested in Italian food beyond just recipes, pick up her books. They will not disappoint.

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  5. A Culinary History Of ‘Milk Through The Ages’

    Food historian Anne Mendelson examines how varieties of animal milk have been processed and consumed since antiquity in her new book, Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk through the Ages.

    Anne Mendelson is the author of Stand Facing The Stove: The Story of the Women who gave America ‘The Joy of Cooking’ and the co-founder of the Culinary Historians of New York. She is currently a contributing editor at Gourmet magazine.

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  6. Longform Podcast #315: Elizabeth Kolbert · Longform

    Elizabeth Kolbert, author of Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change and The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, is a staff writer at The New Yorker. “I still nurse the idea in my heart of hearts that something you write, that

    https://longform.org/posts/longform-podcast-315-elizabeth-kolbert

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  7. The History of the Web, and WordPress’s 15th Birthday — Draft Podcast • Post Status

    In this episode, Brian is joined by Jay Hoffmann — the owner and curator of The History of the Web, a timeline and history of the web — and they discuss the project, as well as WordPress’s 15 year arc of history.

    Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

    In this episode, Brian is joined by guest-host Jay Hoffmann. Jay is the Lead Developer at Reaktiv Studios and the creator and curator of The History of the Web. It is a good time to discuss the history of the web with Jay, as WordPress is ready to celebrate its 15th birthday.

    Be sure to subscribe to Jay’s newsletter on the History of the Web website to receive new articles on such a fascinating project.

    Brian and Jay discuss his work at Reaktiv, his prior work at Sesame Street Workshop and Random House, and the project he’s worked on for two years now documenting the web’s timeline and history. It was a fun discussion on all fronts.

    https://poststatus.com/the-history-of-the-web-and-wordpresss-15th-birthday-draft-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  8. Episode 106: The Blood Libel | 15 Minute History

    Host: Joan Neuberger, Department of HistoryGuest: Robert Weinberg, Swarthmore College

    In Kiev, in 1911, a Jewish factory manager named Mendel Beilis was indicted for murdering a young boy. Many believed that Beilis had carried out the murder as part of a ritual known as the “blood libel,” in which Jews used the blood of gentile children for baking Passover matzo. Where the idea of the “blood ritual” come from and why did people all over the world believe it? And what happened to Mendel Beilis?

    Historian Robert Weinberg, who teaches Russian history at Swarthmore College is here to answer these questions.

    https://15minutehistory.org/2018/05/09/episode-106-the-blood-libel/

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

Page 1 of 4Older