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Tagged with “development” (11)

  1. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can’t link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  2. Jason Grigsby — Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!

    No one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier.

    It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement.

    Argue about programming languages, memory management and reach all you want. There is one undeniable disadvantage that the mobile web faces that native apps don’t–over a decade of legacy code, cruft and entrenched organizational politics.

    But the web is essential. Even companies whose businesses are centered on native apps need web pages to sell those apps. We can demonstrate time and again that a web-​​based approach is a smart investment.

    So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

    And most importantly, how should we be changing our web infrastructure, tools and workflow for the coming zombie apocalypse of devices.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/jason-grigsby-native-is-easy-mobile-web-is-freaking-hard/

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  3. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  4. Web Axe Episode 75

    "… Ross interviews web guru Jeremy Keith; Dennis and Ross discuss news, articles, and Google Wave. " http://webaxe.blogspot.com/2009/10/podcast-75-jeremy-keith-interview-wave.html

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  5. Hanselminutes: The History and Future of Web Standards with Molly Holzschlag

    Scott’s in Mexico this week and he’s sitting down with Molly Holzschlag. Molly is a well-known Web standards advocate, instructor, and author and correctly works for Opera as an evangelist. She explains the history of HTML, SGML and XML and we chat about where we think the web is headed.

    From http://www.hanselminutes.com/default.aspx?showID=200

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  6. Interview with PPK about mobile web development

    An interview with PPK after a tech talk in the Yahoo offices in the UK. We covered mobile web development, testing ideas, libraries, web standards and conference talks.

    http://www.archive.org/details/InterviewWithPpkAboutMobileWebDevelopment

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  7. Jeremy Keith {27} Still Brighton at 3am

    In issue #27, we keep Jeremy Keith awake at 3am, discussing Clearleft, Javascript, Huffduffer, Microformats and Salter Cane.

    http://www.creativexpert.com/2009/06/23/jeremy-keith-27-still-brighton-at-3am/

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  8. Eric Freaking Meyer

    In issue #26, we speak with Eric Freaking Meyer about CSS, Web Standards, Google IO, the Death of IE6, Javascript and the web as a platform.

    http://www.creativexpert.com/2009/06/15/eric-meyer-26-the-css-ninja-pirate-tells-all/

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  9. Bruce M. Hood - Supersense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable

    http://www.pointofinquiry.org/bruce_m._hood_supersense_why_we_believe_in_the_unbelievable/

    Bruce M. Hood is chair of the Cognitive Development Center in the Experimental Psychology Department at the University of Bristol. He was a research fellow at Cambridge and has been a visiting scientist at MIT and professor at Harvard. Hood has received many awards for his work in child development and cognitive neuroscience. His newest book is Supersense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable.

    In this discussion with D.J. Grothe, Bruce M. Hood explains how his agenda is different than the common skeptical agenda to disprove supernatural claims, and instead is an attempt to explain why people believe hold such beliefs in the first place. He argues that everyone is born with a "supersense," an instinct to believe in unseen forces and to recognize patterns and infer their causation, citing examples such as seeing Jesus in a grilled cheese sandwich, or the case of the "haunted scrotum." He explains how this supersense is universal, and that even skeptics and rationalists often exhibit it in their lives through rituals and the owning certain valued possessions, such as Richard Dawkins’ prizing of objects once owned by Charles Darwin or MIT growing saplings from the tree under which Newton first discovered the laws of gravity. He details how rituals give a perceived sense of control to believers, and how they may actually affect a believer’s performance. He talks about the "secular supernatural," contrasting it with the "religious supernatural." He argues against Daniel Dennett’s and Richard Dawkins’s thesis that religious belief results primarily from indoctrination in childhood. And he defends the position that unbelievable beliefs serve important social functions.

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  10. FLOSS Weekly 55: jquery

    "jQuery, a lightweight JavaScript library emphasizing JavaScript and HTML interaction." http://thisweekintech.com/floss55

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

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