Indyplanets / collective

There are four people in Indyplanets’s collective.

Huffduffed (4536)

  1. Building And Dwelling

    Richard Sennett, one of the world’s leading thinkers on the urban environment, traces the relationship between how cities are built and how people live in them.

    In describing how cities such as Paris, Barcelona and New York assumed their modern forms, Sennett explores the intimate relationship between the good built environment and the good life.

    This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 15th March 2018. Discover more about this event here:

    Original video:
    Downloaded by on Tue, 20 Mar 2018 12:12:12 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. An IndieWeb Podcast: Episode 0 “Considering the User”

    This is a test or alpha episode of An Indieweb Podcast (working title). In it, David Shanske and and I talk about a variety of Indieweb topics, with the theme of "Considering the User", inspired by an article we were reading this week.


    Tagged with indieweb

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  3. Disrupting Dystopia - The Bruce Sterling Talk - SXSW 2018

    Original video:
    Downloaded by on Fri, 16 Mar 2018 21:13:33 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  4. Lucinda Williams Says Whatever the Hell She Wants - Death, Sex & Money - WNYC

    When Lucinda Williams was in elementary school, all the other kids brought rock collections and other standard fare to show-and-tell. But she brought a folder. "I put this notebook together of seven poems and a short story by Cindy Williams," she remembers. Decades later, she’s still documenting her impressions of the world, now in raw, often mournful songs that explore death, heartbreak, abandonment, and love. Many of her them are based in the American south, where Lucinda grew up—including those on her latest album The Ghosts of Highway 20. "I know these roads like the back of my hand," she sings on the title track.

    Lucinda’s father was Miller Williams, a prolific southern poet. Her mother, Lucille, was a pianist. They split up when Lucinda was about ten. "That’s all just kind of a big blur," Lucinda says about that time. Her mother had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenic tendencies, and she spent most of her life in therapy or mental hospitals. Her father took over Lucinda and her two siblings, and tried to help them understand that their mother was sick. "My dad was actually quite protective of her, and he would say, ‘It’s not her fault, she’s not well,’" Lucinda told me. "There’s a part of that that’s healthy; the only problem is that I never gave myself permission to be angry at my mother."

    Lucinda was close to her father throughout her life. He encouraged her interest in words and writing, even taking her to visit Flannery O’Connor when she was a little girl. So it was especially hard for her to see him go through Alzheimer’s disease. He died last year, less than six months after the summer day when he told Lucinda he couldn’t write poetry anymore. "I just sat there and just cried," she remembers. "That was when I lost him."

    At 63, Lucinda says she’s more successful than ever, selling out shows on the road and happily in love with her manager Tom Overby, whom she married on stage during an encore in 2009. But, she told me, getting older can still feel like a drag. "I don’t like the aging process. I don’t like getting older because of all the loss. It just gets harder and harder."

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - The Life Scientific, Stephanie Shirley on computer coding

    As a young woman, Stephanie Shirley worked at the Dollis Hill Research Station building computers from scratch: but she told young admirers that she worked for the Post Office, hoping they would think she sold stamps. In the early 60s she changed her name to Steve and started selling computer programmes to companies who had no idea what they were or what they could do, employing only mothers who worked from home writing code by hand with pen and pencil and then posted it to her. By the mid-80s her software company employed eight thousand people, still mainly women with children. She made an absolute fortune but these days Stephanie thinks less about making money and much more about how best to give it away.

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  6. Algorisky

    From Google search to Facebook news, algorithms shape our online experience. But like us, algorithms are flawed. Programmers write cultural biases into code, whether they realize it or not. Author Luke Dormehl explores the impact of algorithms, on and offline. Staci Burns and James Bridle investigate the human cost when YouTube recommendations are abused. Anthropologist Nick Seaver talks about the danger of automating the status quo. Safiya Noble looks at preventing racial bias from seeping into code. And Allegheny County’s Department of Children and Family Services shows us how a well-built algorithm can help save lives.

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  7. 301: Hangovers - ShopTalk

    We’ve recovered from our ep300 festivities and we’re back answering your Q’s with our best A’s - How to handle multiple projects on a dev team? What should we call JavaScript? Tips for scroll-jacking in a nice way? Best practices for CSS? And how to write when you don’t want to write?

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  8. How does the internet work? Julia Evans on CodeNewbie

    You type in a url and you get a website. But how did you get that website? What are all the little steps that happen when you request a page and (hopefully) see that page in your browser? Julia Evans breaks down how the internet works and gives us an amazing introduction to computer networking.

    Julia is a software developer who lives in Montreal. She works on infrastructure at Stripe, gives talks and has published a collection of awesome free programming zines.

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  9. Claire L. Evans, Author of Broad Band- The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet | Internet History Podcast

    Claire Evans is the author of the new book: Broad Band The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. This is the best tech history book I’ve read in a while and you know I read them all. Of special note, considering our 90s-heavy focus on this podcast, the book includes the stories of, which was a competitor to (which we’ve previously covered) and which was a competitor to Ivillage (which, again, we’ve spoke at length about). But you also get an amazing portair of tech in the 1970s, hypertext as a movement outside of the web, and stories about amazing women like Grace Hopper and Jake Feinler.

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  10. In the Wake of Wakefield

    Twenty years ago, in February 1998, one of the most serious public health scandals of the 20th century was born, when researcher, Andrew Wakefield and his co-authors published a paper in the medical journal The Lancet suggesting a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. As we know, in the years that followed, Wakefield’s paper was completely discredited as "an elaborate fraud" and retracted. Attempts by many other researchers to replicate his "findings" have all failed and investigations unearthed commercial links and conflicts of interests underpinning his original work. Wakefield himself was struck off the medical register.

    And yet, the ripples of that episode are still being felt today all over the world as a resurgent anti-vaccine movement continues to drive down inoculation rates, particularly in developed Western societies, where measles rates have rocketed particularly in Europe and the United States.

    But the Wakefield scandal hasn’t just fostered the current ant-vax movement but has played a key role in helping to undermine trust in a host of scientific disciplines from public health research to climate science and GM technology.

    Through the archive, science journalist Adam Rutherford explores the continuing legacy of the anti-vaccine movement on the anniversary of one of its most notorious episodes, and explore its impact on health, on research and on culture both at home and abroad.

    Adam Rutherford explores the 20-year legacy of a paper linking the MMR vaccine and autism.

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