Heilemann / collective

There are two people in Heilemann’s collective.

Huffduffed (4939)

  1. Is CSS a programming language? - overflow: audible;

    In March, Heydon posted an inflammatory tweet, as he often does. :-)

    If you don’t think CSS is a programming language, you have a parochial view of programming and, I’m willing to bet, a parochial view on most other things - gender and ethnicity included.
    

    That escalated quickly. While one might be both racist and not consider CSS to be a programming language, it seems a spurious correlation. And it’s an especially strong take, given that Heydon appears to have changed his position on the matter. This was him tweeting in 2013:

    HTML is not a programming language. CSS even less so.
    

    So, which is it? Are we on the path to yet another “it depends”? And whether it depends or not, does it matter? Would “elevating” CSS to the status of a programming language encourage programmers to take CSS development more seriously? Or does moving CSS into a realm with a traditionally higher barrier to entry end up an exercise in exclusion?

    Heydon and I discuss this. For an hour. It’s a civil conversation, don’t worry.

    https://www.overflowaudible.com/posts/is-css-a-programming-language/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. The Blarney Pilgrims Podcast Episode 9: Kevin Burke

    A boy in post war London, learning the fiddle from Ms. Christopherson, bumping into Joe Burke at JFK after failing to get Arlo Guthrie’s phone number from Directory Enquiries, and so much more. This was delightful. Have a listen.

    https://blarneypilgrims.fireside.fm/9

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 4 Good Old Boys

    If you disagree with someone — if you find what they think appalling — is there any value in talking to them? In the early 1970s, the talk show host Dick Cavett, the governor of Georgia Lester Maddox, and the singer Randy Newman tried to answer this question.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/34-good-old-boys

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 3Tempest in a Teacup

    Bohea, the aroma of tire fire, Mob Wives, smugglers, “bro” tea, and what it all means to the backstory of the American Revolution. Malcolm tells the real story on what happened in Boston on the night of December 16, 1773.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/33-tempest-in-a-teacup

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 2 The Tortoise and the Hare

    A weird speech by Antonin Scalia, a visit with the some serious legal tortoises, and a testy exchange with the experts at the Law School Admissions Council prompts Malcolm to formulate his Grand Unified Theory for fixing higher education.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/32-the-tortoise-and-the-hare

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. There’s still hope for building on the web - The Verge

    Nilay Patel interviews Paul Ford about his hopefulness in tech, his recent piece in Wired, and the state of building stuff for the web.

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/6/20751655/paul-ford-interview-web-writer-programmer-vergecast-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 1: Puzzle Rush

    Malcolm challenges his assistant Camille to the Law School Admissions Test. He gets halfway through, panics, runs out of time, and wonders: why does the legal world want him to rush?"

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/31-puzzle-rush

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Rutgar Bregman’s case for UBI, open borders, and a 15-hour workweek - Vox

    Rutger Bregman, author of Utopia for Realists, talks to Ezra Klein about the power and purpose of utopian thinking.

    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/7/26/8909436/rutger-bregman-utopia-for-realists-ubi-open-borders

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. MJS 101: Chris Ferdinandi

    In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Chris Ferdinandi, a Senior Front-End Engineer at Mashery. Chris is also a panelist on the podcast JavaScript Jabber and runs Go Make Things. Chris started out his career as in Human Resources, decided he wanted to go into development after he was asked to work on a coding project by his manager and he really enjoyed it. He got his first coding job as an entry level developer after attending a web development conference. Chris authors Vanilla JavaScript Pocket Guides which are short, focused e-books and video courses made for beginners.

    https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/mjs-101-chris-ferdinandi/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. JSJ 375: Are You Hurting the Web?

    Today the panel discusses the effect of current development practices, such as the heavy reliance JavaScript, on the web. Chris explains why he believes that current development practices are ruining the web. The panelists discuss different situations where they see complications on the web. They discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using an enterprise scale platform like React. The panel discusses Twitter’s move away from their legacy code base to CSS and JavaScript.

    The panelists agree that the way things are built, since it’s so JavaScript heavy, is alienating to people who work with other languages, and in turn other areas like UI are undervalued. They talk about possible reasons things ended up this way and some of the historical perception of a frontend as not a place for ‘real’ development. Because the web is now a serious platform, things associated with the backend has been thrown at the frontend where it doesn’t belong. They talk about changes in the ways programming is viewed now versus the past.

    There is a discussion about how market demands that have influenced the web and if the market value CSS as highly as other languages. They mention some of the Innovations in CSS. Chris shares his solutions for the problems they’ve been discussing, namely using less JavaScript, leaning more heavily on what the browser gives you out of the box, and avoiding dependency where possible. They talk about ways to get involved if you want to take a leaner approach to the web. Ultimately, it is important to embrace things about the past that worked, but sprinkle in new technology when it makes sense.

    https://devchat.tv/js-jabber/jsj-375-are-you-hurting-the-web/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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