Tagged with “online” (12)

  1. #0026: This Is Haughey Do It

    The evolution of MetaFilter: this week Paul Ford and Rich Ziade talk to Matt Haughey, the founder of MetaFilter, the collection of sites and communities that Paul describes as “one of the real success stories of the web.” The conversation covers Matt’s early career at Pyra Labs, the accessibility of digital technologies, his current job as a writer for Slack, and how if you spend enough time publishing online, you’ll inevitably attract the attention of two groups — trolls and lawyers.

    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/postlighttrackchanges/this-is-haughey-do-it
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 17 Aug 2016 01:21:19 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. BBC Radio 4 - Analysis, The End of Free

    Andrew Brown of The Guardian asks if the dramatic rise of ad-blocking software will undermine the commercial model behind most free news on the internet. He finds an industry in deep concern over the "Ad-blockalypse" - with these new programmes meaning that advertisers may refuse to continue to subsidise online news providers if consumers are now no longer seeing their online adverts. Can the industry persuade people to pay for what was previously available at no charge? And if not, can commercial online news services survive?


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. 245: Build Your Own Platform | seanwes podcast

    Do you really need a website? Do you really need your own domain and a place to call home?

    There are a lot of tools and platforms out there happy to represent you and act as your home. A lot of the hard work of development is taken care of for you. You can just show up, do your thing and be done.

    But it does mean pointing people to those platforms. If you’re telling anyone to go to your profile on these other platforms, you are telling them that’s where your home is.

    This means you are putting your trust and livelihood in platforms that are looking out for their own best interest. They can change the rules, they can change the game, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

    The online world looked very different 10 years ago and you can be sure it will look very different 10 years from now. The only thing that is certain is change. When you build your home on someone else’s platform, you are putting your full trust in them. But they have to look out for their own best interest.

    The only platform you control is your own. When you build and sell on other platforms, you often don’t get the customer data either. You might get more exposure, but without the customer data you can’t build a relationship.

    If you don’t have the customer data to build a relationship, you won’t get repeat buyers. The lifetime value of your customers is going to be very small.

    Yes, the cost of building your own platform is great. But you should also be considering the long-term cost of not building your own platform. What is the price you place on being irrelevant in 10 years?


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Reply All #27 The Fever

    This week, producer Stephanie Foo tells a story about dating online that is unlike any we’ve ever heard before.


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Online Comments - a “wicked” problem - Future Tense

    It’s a wicked problem, says social technologist Suw Charman-Anderson. That is, the lack of civility online when people leave comments.

    We tend to blame the poison on so-called "trolls". But does blaming others overlook our own role in reducing standards of online discourse?

    In a two part series, Future Tense looks at the difficulties involved in fostering a genuine online discussion. And we question why so many comment threads quickly deteriorate into the banal, offensive and abusive.


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The ‘Nasty Effect’: How Comments Color Comprehension : NPR

    At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas. But the uncivil discourse that unfolds in comments sections can be poisonous. A study in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on articles can change the way we interpret the news.


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Erin Kissane podcast interview: editorial strategy, web magazines and trolls

    In Episode 4 of the Together London Podcast, I talk to Erin Kissane about what she learned editing A List Apart magazine, her book The Elements of Content Strategy, why she started Contents Magazine, and what we can do about the problem of harassment online.


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Transmedia storytelling

    This week’s episode of the CoP Show explains what transmedia storytelling is and why producers might want to use it.

    The simplest definition of transmedia storytelling is that it is a technique used to tell stories across multiple platforms: TV, radio, games, novels, social media, online or anywhere a story can unfold.

    A transmedia storyteller may create many "entrypoints" across different platforms, so that, for example, a fan of a drama can read the online diaries of their favourite characters or follow their comments on Twitter.

    The theory goes that by doing this not only can you give your audience more of what they want and love but you can also bring in a whole new audience that otherwise would not find your content.

    Joining presenter Simon Smith are Chris Sizemore, Executive Editor of BBC’s Learning & Knowledge Online, Adrian Hon the Chief Creative at transmedia specialist Six to Start and Meg Jayanth, a BBC multi-platform producer.


    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  9. Eli Pariser: Beware online “filter bubbles”

    As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there’s a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don’t get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.

    Pioneering online organizer Eli Pariser is the author of "The Filter Bubble," about how personalized search might be narrowing our worldview.


    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Closing the gap between people’s online and real life social network – Paul Adams

    From IA Summit 2010:

    In the next few years, the most successful social media experiences will be the ones that understand how our offline and online worlds connect and interact. But our tools are still crude. The good news is that despite the complexity involved in understanding human relationships, we can study offline and online communication and create design principles to support what we find. In his presentation, Paul Adams speaks about what he has learned from over two years of research into people’s online and offline relationships.

    From http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/ia-summit-10-day-2

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 2Older