Clampants / tags / work

Tagged with “work” (58)

  1. Radio Atlantic: Ask Not What Your Robots Can Do for You

    Our increasingly smart machines aren’t just changing the workforce; they’re changing us. Already, algorithms are directing human activity in all sorts of ways, from choosing what news people see to highlighting new gigs for workers in the gig economy. What will human life look like as machine learning overtakes more aspects of our society?

    Alexis Madrigal, who covers technology for The Atlantic, shares what he’s learned from his reporting on the past, present, and future of automation with our Radio Atlantic co-hosts, Jeffrey Goldberg (editor in chief), Alex Wagner (contributing editor and CBS anchor), and Matt Thompson (executive editor).

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/radio-atlantic-ask-not-what-your-robots-can-do-for-you/535929/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Caravans in Space

    Is the Earth too perfect? The Moon too grey? Mars too dusty? Then how about setting up a human colony in the depths of space?

    Richard Hollingham travels to the Tennessee Valley Interstellar Workshop in Chattanooga, Tennessee to meet scientists, engineers, doctors and anthropologists planning human colonies in space and spaceships that will take humanity to the stars.

    These are not dreamers - although they all have an ambitious dream - but well qualified experts. Several work at Nasa, others have day jobs at universities and research institutes.

    Richard hears of proposals to build giant space stations and worldships - vessels packed with the best of humanity. These caravans in space might be lifeboats to escape an approaching asteroid or perhaps the first step to colonising the galaxy.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07lhgqx

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. Planet Money: The People Inside Your Machine

    They are hundreds of thousands of people out there doing stuff to your internet that you probably think is automatic. They aren’t computer programmers, they’re just regular people working from their offices, homes and bedrooms. They are the people of Amazon Mechanical Turk.

    Amazon Mechanical Turk is an online marketplace for work. Businesses use it to farm out tiny little tasks like counting the number of people in a photo, and people around the world race to perform those tasks, sometimes for pennies.

    Today on the show, we sneak into the land of Mechanical Turk to meet the people inside.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/01/30/382657657/episode-600-the-people-inside-your-machine

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Kevin Kelly (pt 1) - AI, Robots & Making a Non-Dystopian Tech Future

    This is part one of our conversation w/Kevin Kelly, the founding executive editor of Wired, the guy behind Cool Tools, The "1000 True Fans" theory and much more.

    In this conversation, we talk mainly about how the future will change due to technology, whether things like AI (Artificial Intelligence) will be dangerous and much more.

    You can find out more about Kevin Kelly at www.kk.org

    You can find the NextMarket Podcast at www.technology.fm/nextmarketpodcast/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Humans Are Only a Self-driving Car’s Way of Making Another Self-driving Car

    Over 10,000 years ago we lived in balance with the network. Since then we’ve tried to control, rule and bend it to our whims. In all that time, we’ve never asked ourselves if we’re building something that controls us?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/briansuda/

    Brian Suda is an informatician, which is definitely a real word and not just something he made up once. It is perfectly cromulent.

    Brian lives and works in Reykjavík by way of Edinburgh by way of St. Louis. He’s been living in Iceland long enough that he can correctly pronounce Eyjafjallajökull. That’s quite an impressive party trick …unless the party is in Iceland.

    Brian is a data hound, moving from project to project, always finding interesting ways to expose and represent the data exhaust of our network engine. He built one of the earliest microformats parsers and has written a book on Designing With Data.

    Together with Aitor Garcia, Brian has formed Analog. Their first project involves the production of Kickstarter-funded notebooks beautifully embossed with geographical data.

    At some point, he plans to graph all the world‘s baked goods on a hypercube of bread.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. Tethering the Hovercraft

    A careen through grassroots innovation, speculative design, supply chains and sexual healthcare provision, lashing down over-caffeinated flailing into the grit of socio-technical systems.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/georginavoss/

    Georgina Voss is a writer and researcher working on the interplay of technology, politics and culture. She sometimes writes for The Guardian, and she’s currently in residence at the lovely Lighthouse Arts right here in Brighton working on a design fiction project that asks “what could digital fabrication and hyper-local manufacturing offer to the provision of sexual healthcare?”

    She also holds a doctorate from Sussex Uni, so that’s Doctor Georgina Voss to you.

    George has a knack for exposing the networks underlying the most normal-seeming activities. Usually “logistics” isn’t a word that conjures up much excitement, but George can make you look at shipping containers in a whole new light.

    Oh, and she also hosts a great podcast called Gin and Innovation which has featured dConstruct alumni Dan Williams and James Bridle.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. A Cunning Plan

    Inventing the next twenty years, strategic foresight, fictional futurism and English rural magic: Warren Ellis attempts to convince you that they are all pretty much the same thing, and why it was very important that some people used to stalk around village hedgerows at night wearing iron goggles.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/warrenellis/

    Warren Ellis is a writer. He is not the violinist in the Bad Seeds.

    Some of the things he has written have pictures in them, like Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority. Some of the things he has written are constructed entirely from words, like Crooked Little Vein and the best-selling Gun Machine.

    Gun Machine is currently being developed for television. His book Red was adapted for the big screen in 2010. We shan’t hold it against him.

    You can find him on Twitter, on Tumblr, on This Is My Jam, and you used to be able to find him in Second Life, but most importantly, he has his own website because he’s down with the Indie Web.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Grapes of Wrath Revisited

    Seventy five years ago the American author John Steinbeck published what was to become his most-celebrated novel: The Grapes of Wrath. At the centre of the book is the story of the Joad Family whose farmland in Oklahoma, in America’s mid-west, has turned to dust and whose farm has been repossessed. Faced with destitution they make the epic journey from Oklahoma to California in search of work and a better life. Along the way they are victims of prejudice and face exploitation at the hands of unscrupulous employers.

    The book was an overnight success and for many became the parable of America’s experience of the Great Depression. But it was also controversial with its critics seeing it as little more than thinly disguised left-wing propaganda.

    The BBC’s North America Editor, Mark Mardell has retraced the Joads’ journey to explore the relevance of the book’s themes in today’s America.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p024mymp

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. The New Frontier Of Implantable Technology

    New visions and new progress on the merger of man and machine. We’ll look at the frontier of implantable technology.

    It has this feeling of inevitability. The merger of man and machine. The implanting of computer power in and on the human body. Some future holiday season when people are lined up for software and equipment upgrades that aren’t just handheld – they’re in us and on us. Of us. Plenty of researchers are working that frontier right now. For your health – to track and treat your heart, your mood. Give you a tattoo full of computer circuitry. Others would push right inside to pump up your senses and more. This hour On Point: the new frontier of implantable technology.

    – Tom Ashbrook

    Guests

    John Rogers, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Director of the Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois. Recipient of a 2009 MacArthur ‘Genius’ Grant.

    Michael McAlpine, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/12/18/technology-implantable-john-rogers

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Design Education and Building Teams with the Right Skills

    User experience is an amalgam of information architecture, visual design, interaction design, user research, prototyping, coding, and a host of other skill sets. Combine this complexity with the rapid rate of change in technology and techniques, and it’s no wonder that there’s a gap between the skills required by the industry of UX designers and those taught by design programs in colleges and universities. In this episode of The Digital Life, we discuss the state of design education and how to build teams with the right skills to ship digital products with Jared Spool, Founding Principal of User Interface Engineering.

    http://thedigitalife.com/5_questions/design-education-and-building-teams-with-the-right-skills

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

Page 1 of 6Older