Clampants / tags / innovation

Tagged with “innovation” (41)

  1. After On Episode 24: George Church | Bioengineering

    https://after-on.com/episodes/024

    George Church’s Harvard lab is one of the most celebrated fonts of innovation in the world of life sciences. George’s earliest work on the Human Genome Project arguably pre-dated the actual start of that project. Subsequently, he’s been involved in the creation of almost a hundred companies - 22 of which he co-founded. Much of George’s most recent and celebrated work has been with a transformationally powerful gene-editing technique called CRISPR, which he co-invented.

    George and I discuss CRISPR and its jarring ramifications throughout this week’s edition of the After on Podcast. Our conversation begins with a higher-level survey of the field - one which cleanly and clearly defines CRISPR by placing it into a broader, and also a quite fascinating framework. We cover four topics, which I’ll now define up-front for you, so as to make the interview more accessible.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Babbage and the Dancer (Or, Can You Fall in Love With a Robot?)

    An eight-year-old boy’s encounter with a robotic toy doll ends up changing the course of technological history. Steven Johnson talks with special guests Ken Goldberg and Kate Darling, as we look at the uncanny world of emotional robotics. What if the dystopian future turns out to be one where the robots conquer humanity with their cuteness?

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast/episode-1-babbage-and-the-dancer
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Oct 2016 13:00:40 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. The Color Purple

    In 1856, a teenager experimenting at home accidentally made a colour that was more gaudy and garish than anything that had gone before. William Perkin was messing about at home, trying to make the anti-malarial Quinine - but his experiment went wrong. Instead he made a purple dye that took Victorian London by storm. Philip Ball tells the story of this famous stroke of serendipity. Laurence Llewelyn- Bowen describes the fashion sensation that ensued and chemist, Andrea Sella tells how Perkin’s purple prompted the creation of much more than colourful crinolines.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02xk3vf

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Tony Fadell: The first secret of design is … noticing

    As human beings, we get used to "the way things are" really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity … Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uOMectkCCs
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Science Fiction Becoming A Reality - SXSW Interactive 2015

    In the fictional TV/movie series Star Trek, Captain Kirk talks to his crew via a communicator, has his medical officers assess conditions through a handheld tricorder, and synthesizes food and physical goods using his replicator. This, of course, is science fiction, however, in some cases it is becoming science reality. Many of the technologies that we saw in Star Trek are actually beginning to materialize. Captain Kirk’s communicator could be seen as inspiration for today’s smartphones, 3D printing could be compared to Star Trek’s replicator, and most recently, the $10M Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE is challenging teams to develop a mobile device capable of giving consumers access to diagnostic tools that deliver meaningful information about their health status.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. On Point: Peter Thiel Thinks We All Can Do Better

    Silicon Valley’s Peter Thiel may, famously, be the most successful tech entrepreneur-investor ever. A PayPal founder, ground floor at Facebook – you saw him played in the movie, “The Social Network.” He’s in Space X and Founders Fund and Clarium Capital and on and on. But Peter Thiel is not impressed with our technology age. We’re actually in a tech slowdown, he says. This techno-libertarian says the US, the world, has to surge forward, technologically, or flame out. The way we’re headed won’t cut it. This hour On Point: the techno-libertarian, Peter Thiel.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2014/09/29/peter-thiel-technology-politics-libertarians

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. The Digital Life - Episode 54 - Design is Medicine

    Healthcare is deadly. As patients and clinicians, we have long passed the threshold of comprehension when it comes to the amount of data and variables that support life-critical decisions. The system needs to be redesigned and re-imagined. True change comes from establishing a vision for healthcare that will modernize how doctors and patients interact with their health data to quantified and measurable medicine.

    In this episode of The Digital Life, we discuss the idea that “Design is Medicine,” with Involution Studios Creative Director, Juhan Sonin. In his health design practice, Sonin explores how linear-thinking human beings can interpret non-linear, unbalanced health metrics, and how healthcare can be saved through coordination, presentation and design.

    Join us as we look at the design, data, and policy challenges, as well as the scary new ideas being invented to solve them, that makes tackling the healthcare problem daunting and exciting.

    http://thedigitalife.com/5_questions/design-is-medicine

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Neal Stephenson on Stranger Than Fiction

    Welcome to Stranger Than Fiction, a new six-episode podcast from Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. Each week, Tim Wu—a Future Tense fellow at New America, the author of The Master Switch, and a professor at Columbia Law School—talks to a contemporary science fiction writer about whether we’re living in the future.

    In the debut episode, Wu talks to Neal Stephenson, the award-winning science fiction author of Snow Crash, The Diamond Age, Cryptonomicon, and more. They discuss the purpose of science fiction, geek culture, and whether—contrary to our constant hand-wringing about “everything changing so fast”—innovation has really slowed down.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. Big Picture Science: Nano Nano

    Think small to solve big problems. That, in a nutshell, is the promise of nanotechnology. In this barely visible world, batteries charge 100 times faster and drugs go straight to their targets in the body. Discover some of these nano breakthroughs and how what you can’t see can help you…

    …or hurt you? What if tiny machines turn out to be nothing but trouble? We’ll look at the health and safety risks of nanotech.

    Plus, scaling up in science fiction: why a Godzilla-sized insect is fun, but just doesn’t fly.

    http://radio.seti.org/blog/2012/07/big-picture-science-nano-nano/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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