Clampants / tags / genes

Tagged with “genes” (12)

  1. Undiscovered: Mouse’s Vineyard

    An island associated with summer rest and relaxation is gaining a reputation for something else: Lyme disease. Martha’s Vineyard has one of the highest rates of Lyme in the country. Now MIT geneticist Kevin Esvelt is coming to the island with a potential long-term fix. The catch: It involves releasing up to a few hundred thousand genetically modified mice onto the island. Are Vineyarders ready?

    http://www.undiscoveredpodcast.org/mouses-vineyard.html

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Siddhartha Mukherjee Talks Genetics With David Remnick

    If you could identify a piece of genetic code in a living embryo—one that could affect anything from gender and sexual orientation to a predisposition to mental illness—would you do anything to change that embryo’s development? Should you have the option? Siddhartha Mukherjee, the physician, Pulitzer Prize winner, and author of the new book “The Gene: An Intimate History,” spoke with David Remnick about his family’s personal history with mental illness, and about the moral and political implications of recent discoveries in the field of genetic science.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. Julian Savulescu on Designer Babies

    Is it ethical to select advantageous genes and select against disadvantageous genes when having babies? Julian Savulescu, Director of the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics in Oxford, discusses this question with Nigel Warburton. This bonus episode was originally made for Bioethics Bites in association with the Uehiro Centre and made possible by a grant from the Wellcome Trust.

    http://philosophybites.libsyn.com/julian-savulescu-on-designer-babies-originally-on-bioethics-bites-

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Leonard Lopate: Epigenetics

    Richard Francis discusses the new scientific field of epigenetics, the study of how stress in the environment can impact an individual’s physiology so deeply that those biological scars actually can be inherited by the next generations. In Epigenetics: The Ultimate Mystery of Inheritance he explains why researchers believe that epigenetics holds the key to understanding obesity, cancer, Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism, and diabetes.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Craig Venter on Synthetic Life

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/05/craig-venter-on-synthetic-life

    Scientist and entrepreneur Craig Venter made headlines in 2000 when he was one of the first to sequence the human genome.

    Now, he’s announced another big step: the creation of synthetic life in a laboratory – a bacterium with a cooked-up, man-made genetic code.

    The breakthrough could eventually lead to tailor-made organisms and big benefits in medicine, energy and beyond.

    But what about the ethics – and the risks – of making life in a lab?

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. Robert Crumb in Conversation with Francoise Mouly

    The famed illustrator discusses his work with the art editor of The New Yorker, including his new book, an illustration of the "Book of Genesis", from the Creation to the death of Joseph.

    http://fora.tv/2009/10/23/R_Crumb_in_Conversation_with_Francoise_Mouly

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. Professor Christopher Dye: Are Humans Still Evolving?

    Homo sapiens have been around for 250,000 years - surely long enough to have become fully evolved?

    It was thought that the dramatic extension of life spans during the 20th century eliminated natural selection, but new evidence shows that to be false.

    Will selection always be natural, or could postmodern also mean posthuman?

    http://fora.tv/2009/03/26/Professor_Christopher_Dye_Are_Humans_Still_Evolving

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Futures in Biotech 39: Food: Genetically Modified!

    So if we can design crops that reduce pesticides, grow more effectively in poor soil, bring nutrients such as vitamins A to populations with high incidences of blindness, or even just taste better, why are we hesitating? Why isn’t there a wide consumer acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods?

    http://futuresinbiotech.com/blog/2009/2/24/futures-in-biotech-39-food-genetically-modified.html

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. Richard Dawkins | The Ancestor’s Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Evolution

    Richard Dawkins - known for his ”brilliance and wit” (New Yorker) - is one of the most influential scientists of our time and holds a chair at Oxford University. His highly acclaimed books include The Blind Watchmaker, The Selfish Gene and A Devil’s Chaplain; the New York Times has called him ”one of the most incisive science writers alive.” The Ancestor’s Tale, loosely based in form on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, offers a comprehensive look at 4 billion years of evolution.

    http://libwww.freelibrary.org/podcast/?podcastID=305

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Drew Endy & Jim Thomas “Synthetic Biology Debate”

    Synthetic biology will be one of the driving technological forces of this century. By transforming the complexity and diversity of life into a technology malleable by man, it simultaneously offers some of science’s highest hopes and gravest threats. Like splitting the atom, synthetic biology holds a great wealth of power that must be wielded with care.

    Bioengineer Drew Endy is the leading enabler of open-source biotechnology. Technology historian Jim Thomas is the leading critic of biotech, based with ETC Group in Ottawa. Moderated by Stewart Brand, they will meet to discuss how the emerging and potentially revolutionary capabilities of synthetic biology can be utilized safely, equitably and openly.

    Synthetic biology is swarming ahead all over the world, at a self-accelerating pace far greater than Moore’s Law, with a range of impacts far greater than genetically engineered food crops. Jim Thomas raises the question: "Is Synthetic Biology reckless or wise from the perspective of ‘the long now?’. I feel the synthetic biology community is driven by immensely short term assumptions and motivations, and as a result the medium term prospect for this platform holds both predictable problems and nasty surprises."

    http://blog.longnow.org/2008/11/18/drew-endy-jim-thomas-synthetic-biology-debate/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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