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Tagged with “economy” (30)

  1. Radio Atlantic: Ask Not What Your Robots Can Do for You

    Our increasingly smart machines aren’t just changing the workforce; they’re changing us. Already, algorithms are directing human activity in all sorts of ways, from choosing what news people see to highlighting new gigs for workers in the gig economy. What will human life look like as machine learning overtakes more aspects of our society?

    Alexis Madrigal, who covers technology for The Atlantic, shares what he’s learned from his reporting on the past, present, and future of automation with our Radio Atlantic co-hosts, Jeffrey Goldberg (editor in chief), Alex Wagner (contributing editor and CBS anchor), and Matt Thompson (executive editor).

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/radio-atlantic-ask-not-what-your-robots-can-do-for-you/535929/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Freakonomics: Are We in a Mattress-Store Bubble?

    You’ve seen them — everywhere! — and often clustered together, as if central planners across America decided that what every city really needs is a Mattress District. There are now dozens of online rivals too. Why are there so many stores selling something we buy so rarely?

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/are-we-mattress-store-bubble/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. Planet Money, Episode 625: The Last Job

    There are some very smart people out there arguing that machines and computers are stealing our jobs. And that when these jobs go away, they won’t be replaced. They think that in the future, there will be fewer and fewer jobs.

    In the short-term, that’s a big problem, but in the long-term, it could be great news. If robots are doing all the work, people can just relax, right?

    What happens when the jobs go away? No one knows. So, in collaboration with The Truth, we made something up. Our show today is a work of fiction.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/20/408292388/episode-625-the-last-job

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Surviving in ‘The Second Machine Age’

    http://www.kqed.org/a/forum/R201401271000

    From driverless cars to 3D printing, inventions that we once only imagined are now reality. M.I.T. experts Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson have dubbed this era of growing automation and digitization "The Second Machine Age." They join us to talk about what these vast and ongoing technological changes mean for our societal and economic futures.

    Host: Michael Krasny

    Guests: Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at the Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management and co-author of "The Second Machine Age" Erik Brynjolfsson, professor in the MIT Sloan School of Management, director of the MIT Center for Digital Business and co-author of "The Second Machine Age"

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. The ‘Creative Class’ Revisited

    A decade ago, on the other side of two wars, an economic meltdown, and mass unemployment, economist Richard Florida made a big splash asserting the economic power and glory of what he dubbed the “creative class.”

    A new social class, he said, of writers and dancers and artists, innovators in science and medicine, technology and media.Freelancers and free thinkers whose open minds were reshaping the world and firing up a lot of wealth. Suddenly, every ambitious city and town wanted to be a creative class magnet.

    Ten years on, how’s that all going?

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2012/07/12/the-creative-class

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. Salt - Part One

    Something insignificant is sometimes said to be worth "a pinch of salt." On the other hand, people of impeccable integrity are often called, "the salt of the earth." Salt is now among the most common substances on earth, although once it was rarer and more valuable than gold. Paul Kennedy considers the incredible history, science and mythology of salt.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. A New Look at Population Bombs and Bulges

    http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/02/a-fresh-look-at-population-bombs-and-bulges/

    "…a variety of experts discuss the path past 7 billion people. One voice is that of Mara Hvistendahl, the Asia correspondent for the journal’s news staff and author of “Unnatural Selection,” a potent and revealing book about selective abortion and related issues. In this case, she discusses her piece on the potential benefits and perils of “youth bulges” like those underlying the turmoil in many Arab countries this year.?

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Orion Magazine presents James Howard Kunstler: The Future of American Cities

    As the climate warms, oil disappears, and the economy shakes and shifts, how will our urban places adapt? Will density and communal living be important tools for human resilience, or will city life become costly and unworkable—or even unlivable? Listen to Kunstler share his forecast for the American city, elaborate on his feature in the July/August 2011 issue of the magazine, and answer listener questions.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. Ken Robinson: Rethinking Educational Paradigms

    Celebrated education expert Ken Robinson argues that most "modern" approaches to learning are actually relics of an outdated, industrial-age system. This program was recorded in collaboration with the 2010 Aspen Ideas Festival, on July 8, 2010.

    Sir Ken Robinson is an expert in creativity, innovation, and human resources. He works with governments in Europe, Asia, and the United States, and with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, and cultural organizations. Robinson led a national commission on creativity, education, and the economy for the UK government and was central in forming a creative- and economic-development strategy as part of the Northern Ireland peace process. Formerly, he was professor of education at the University of Warwick.

    He has received several honorary degrees, the Athena Award from the Rhode Island School of Design, the Peabody Medal, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal from the Royal Society of Arts. He received a knighthood for his services to the arts. His latest book is The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything (Viking, 2009).

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Niall Ferguson: A Checkup on Global Financial Health

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/06/niall-ferguson-a-checkup-on-global-financial

    Bigfoot historian Niall Ferguson made his name with a fearless readiness to speak to history and our moment in it in the biggest terms.

    If you want to talk about the rise and fall of empires – Roman, American, British, Soviet – Ferguson’s your man. Now he’s followed history right into the middle of a raging debate over whether we need more stimulus spending right now, or need to slam on the spending brakes to avoid a system collapse.

    Ferguson’s a hit-the-brakes man. He dukes it out with Paul Krugman

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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