Clampants / tags / design

Tagged with “design” (165)

  1. Josh Clark: The Era of the Algorithm

    What do you want the robots to do for you?

    Josh Clark at CreativeMornings New York, January 2018. Free events like this one are hosted every month in dozens of cities. Discover hundreds of talks from the world’s creative community at https://creativemornings.com/talks

    Don’t miss a video. Subscribe! https://bit.ly/1jeJwut

    Follow CreativeMornings: https://twitter.com/creativemorning https://facebook.com/creativemornings

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhlJ6NQ88dQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 01 Feb 2018 13:46:43 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Episode 6: Designing the Future

    How do you design the future? Today we talk with cyberpunk founder and design theorist Bruce Sterling and feminist/activist writer Jasmina Tešanović about speculative design, design fictions, open source hardware, the maker movement, and the soft robots of our domestic future. Plus we go behind the scenes of the creation of a design fiction by Bruce, Jasmina, Sheldon Brown, and the Clarke Center—a video installation called My Elegant Robot Freedom.

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-6-designing-the-future/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. John Whalen on Using Brain Science in Design

    In this week’s Design Podcast, I sit down with John Whalen, chief experience officer at 10 Pearls, a digital development company focused on mobile and web apps, enterprise solutions, cyber security, big data, IoT, and cloud and dev ops. We talk about the “six minds” that underlie each human experience, why it’s important for designers to understand brain science, and what people really look for in a voice assistant.

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/john-whalen-on-using-brain-science-in-design

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. The Complexities of UX Design in Health Settings | Anne Cooper talk video

    Collaborate Bristol - The South West’s leading UX and Design Conference: http://collaborateconf.com

    Talk by Anne Cooper at Collaborate Bristol 2017

    The Complexities of UX Design in Health Settings and the Impact of Human Factors

    This session explores the complexities of UX design in health settings with a particular focus on clinical safety, risk and human factors.

    Anne gives real life examples and explains the importance of excellent UX design in the health context.

    Anne is Chief Nurse at NHS Digital

    Collaborate Bristol is organised by Nomensa - the strategic UX design experts.

    Web: http://nomensa.com Work: http://nomensa.com/ux-services Blog: http://nomensa.com/blog Careers: http://nomensa.com/ux-careers

    Twitter: http://twitter.com/we_are_nomensa LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/nomensa Facebook: http://facebook.com/Nomensa Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/Nomensa

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M-EX41rAiU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:53:55 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. 99% Invisible 219 - Unpleasant Design

    Benches in parks, train stations, bus shelters and other public places are meant to offer seating, but only for a limited duration. Many elements of such seats are subtly or overtly restrictive. Arm rests, for instance, indeed provide spaces to rest arms, but they also prevent people from lying down or sitting in anything but a prescribed position. This type of design strategy is sometimes classified as "hostile architecture," or simply: "unpleasant design."

    Gordan Savičić and Selena Savić, co-editors of the book Unpleasant Design, are quick to point out that unpleasant designs are not failed designs, but rather successful ones in the sense that they deter certain activities by design.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/roman-mars/219-unpleasant-design
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. 99% Invisible 204 - The SoHo Effect

    In San Francisco, the area South of Market Street is called SoMa. The part of town North of the Panhandle is known as NoPa. Around the intersection of North Oakland, Berkeley and Emeryville, real estate brokers are pitching properties as part of NOBE. An area of downtown Oakland is being branded as KoNo, short for Koreatown Northgate. But no one actually calls it that, or at least, not yet.

    These types of names have spiraled to the point of parody.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. 99% Invisible 174: From the Sea, Freedom

    In 1933, delegates from the United States and fourteen other countries met in Montevideo, Uruguay to define what it means to be a state. The resulting treaty from the Montevideo Convention established four basic criteria for statehood—essentially, what is required to be recognized as a country.

    The state as a person of international law should possess the following qualifications:

    1. A defined territory

    2. A permanent population

    3. A government

    4. Capacity to enter into relations with the other states

    Over time, some people got to thinking that the criteria for becoming a state seemed surprisingly simple. So simple, that some attempted to declare their house an independent country. So-called “micronations” popped up around the world.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. dConstruct 2015: Nick Foster

    Jeremy and Nick discuss the details of design fiction, and talk about the need for a mundane futurism, which leads them to compare notes on the differences between Derby and Silicon Valley.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/nick-foster

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. 99% Invisible 181: Milk Carton Kids

    On a Sunday morning in 1982, in Des Moines, Iowa, Johnny Gosch left his house to begin his usual paper route. A short time later, his parents were awakened by a phone call–it was a neighbor—their paper hadn’t come. When the Gosches went looking for Johnny they found only his red wagon full of newspapers, abandoned on the sidewalk.

    Johnny Gosch was 13 when he disappeared. He had blue eyes and dirty blond hair with a small gap between his front teeth. And his would be the first face of a missing child ever printed on a milk carton.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/milk-carton-kids/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Designing the Future Through Tangible Storytelling

    As designers, new technologies are always capturing our imaginations, but in order to become part of our everyday life they need be introduced through human contexts and meaningful stories. In this talk, IoT expert and “maker-futurist” Carla Diana will share methods and strategies for new product visions based on vivid storytelling and tangible model making, looking at techniques such as scenario storyboarding, video narratives and vision imagery. She’ll share case studies from recent product design projects as well as experiments from her design lab work to showcase ways that near future technologies can be embraced as compelling ideas for new types of everyday products.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/carla-diana

    Carla Diana is a hybrid designer keenly focused on realising new visions for Smart Objects and the Internet of Things. In addition to her industry experience at some of the world’s top design firms, such as frog Design and Smart Design, Carla maintains strategic alliances with a number of academic research groups. She is a member of the Georgia Tech Socially Intelligent Machines Lab, and a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts and the University of Pennsylvania’s Integrated Product Design Program, where she developed the first course on Smart Objects. She is Advisor for the group Tomorrow-Lab, a young design firm that creates electro-mechanical solutions for smart devices and she continues work as a Fellow at Smart Design, where she oversees the Smart Interaction Lab.

    Carla’s recent article, “Talking, Walking Objects”, appeared on the cover of the New York Times Sunday Review in January 2013, and is a good representation of her view of our robotic future. She has just completed a children’s book for Maker Media about the future of 3D printing and design entitled LEO the Maker Prince.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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