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Tagged with “alexis madrigal” (2)

  1. Radio Atlantic: Ask Not What Your Robots Can Do for You

    Our increasingly smart machines aren’t just changing the workforce; they’re changing us. Already, algorithms are directing human activity in all sorts of ways, from choosing what news people see to highlighting new gigs for workers in the gig economy. What will human life look like as machine learning overtakes more aspects of our society?

    Alexis Madrigal, who covers technology for The Atlantic, shares what he’s learned from his reporting on the past, present, and future of automation with our Radio Atlantic co-hosts, Jeffrey Goldberg (editor in chief), Alex Wagner (contributing editor and CBS anchor), and Matt Thompson (executive editor).

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/radio-atlantic-ask-not-what-your-robots-can-do-for-you/535929/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Humans and technology: two perspectives from two eminent thinkers - Future Tense

    In this edition of Future Tense we hear from two prominent thinkers on the intersection between humanity and technology.

    Nicholas Carr is the best-selling author of The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains. He’s just released his latest book entitled The Glass Cage: Automation and Us. Carr ponders our willingness to give over to the machine: to allow computers and robots to assume the difficult and high-level thinking tasks that, according to Carr, form the very basis of our ongoing creativity.

    Our second guest, Alexis Madrigal is a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley’s Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society. He’s also a prominent American technology journalist and thinker. Madrigal just left his role as deputy editor of The Atlantic.com to take up a new position as Silicon Valley Bureau Chief for Fusion – a digital cable and satellite television network. Robotics, says Madrigal, will help us rethink our humanity. But he also worries that our understanding of the future has become too tech-centric and dominated by the big digital players.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/humans-and-technology--ep/5844122#transcript

    —Huffduffed by Clampants