Tagged with “tech” (39)

  1. Google Glass Didn’t Disappear. You Can Find It On The Factory Floor : All Tech Considered : NPR

    Remember Google Glass?

    They’re the headsets that look like regular glasses but have a small computer on the side to speak to and access the Internet. If that’s not ringing a bell, it could be because Google Glass fizzled out and was discontinued in the consumer market.

    But now, it’s getting a second life in the manufacturing industry.

    One of the pioneers of this technology is a company based in suburban Atlanta. AGCO has factories all over the world where it makes large tractors, chemical sprayers and other farm equipment.

    At one of AGCO’s factories, Heather Erickson is putting together a tractor engine before it goes on to the assembly line.

    She’s wearing a red-and-black uniform over her blue jeans at a facility in Jackson, Minn. And she’s wearing something else: Google Glass on her head.

    Clever Hacks Give Google Glass Many Unintended Powers ALL TECH CONSIDERED Clever Hacks Give Google Glass Many Unintended Powers "It took a little getting used to. But once I got used to it, it’s just been awesome," Erickson says.

    Google Glass tells her what to do should she forget, for example, which part goes where. "I don’t have to leave my area to go look at the computer every time I need to look up something," she says.

    With Google Glass, she scans the serial number on the part she’s working on. This brings up manuals, photos or videos she may need. She can tap the side of headset or say "OK Glass" and use voice commands to leave notes for the next shift worker.

    The headsets are being used in other industries as well. Companies working in the health care, entertainment and energy industries are listed as some of the Google Glass certified partners. And autistic children are using the technology to recognize emotions.

    It was always my assumption that Google Glass was going to go into business for enterprises instead of mass consumer consumption. Tiffany Tsai, a technology writer Peggy Gullick, business process improvement director with AGCO, says the addition of Google Glass has been "a total game changer." Quality checks are now 20 percent faster, she says, and it’s also helpful for on-the-job training of new employees. Before this, workers used tablets.

    "We had a lot of tablets on our floor, and the tablets were being broken just by being dropped. And tractors are very tall machines when you’re climbing on and off," Gullick says. "So we were looking for a solution that offered them more information in a more timely manner."

    AGCO has about 100 employees using the custom Google Glass, which is attached to them and harder to lose. Each costs about $2,000.

    Tiffany Tsai, who writes about technology, says it’s one of a growing number of companies — including General Electric and Boeing — testing it out.

    "It was always my assumption that Google Glass was going to go into business for enterprises instead of mass consumer consumption," she says.

    She was one of the early users of Google Glass when it came out in 2013.

    Two years later, it was discontinued for some consumers because people were concerned about privacy and security. And there were concerns that the headset could be distracting to drivers or that it wasn’t made with all people in mind.

    Applying A Silicon Valley Approach To Jump-Start Medical Research SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS Applying A Silicon Valley Approach To Jump-Start Medical Research Tsai says another reason for it being discontinued was its challenging of social norms: With Google Glass, it may look like you’re listening to the person in front of you, but you could actually be watching a movie or looking up sports stats. You could be in a different world.

    "On Google Glass, [another person] has no idea what’s happening, does not see anything that the user is looking at or analyzing," Tsai says. "And that creates this disconnect between people, and I think that that’s highly frowned upon right now, especially with older generations."

    Millennials may be more open to it in the future, but Google Glass still has a long way to go until it’s considered more socially acceptable, she says.

    But at AGCO’s factories, it’s not only accepted; it’s desired. Gullick says the company plans to double the number in use by the end of the year.

    WABE host Jim Burress contributed to this report.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  2. Etsy engineering director Lara Hogan on public speaking - Inside Intercom

    A conversation about how and why you should begin public speaking, the importance of good feedback, tech conference’s diversity problem, and more.

    https://blog.intercom.com/etsy-engineering-director-lara-hogan-on-public-speaking/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Alex Langley’s Tech Chat episode 02 - It’s An Insecure World

    Alex Langley and guests chat about the latest tech news and developments with a distinctly British slant. The main show comes out every month with follow up bitesize shows every week in between.

    Andy Budd and Mick Peace join Alex in the studio, putting the world to rights on all aspects of online security

    http://techchatuk.com/#episodes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Alex Langley’s Tech Chat

    Monthly technology chat show bringing you the latest news and developments with a distinctly British slant.

    Lars Hyland a genuine guru on digital learning and Rosa Fox an actual software developer and organiser of codebar Brighton join me in the studio talking about insecure passwords and we all get takeaway delivered

    http://techchatuk.com/#episodes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Dark Patterns and Ada Lovelace - Tech Weekly podcast | Technology | The Guardian

    How user interfaces are designed to trick us. Plus, the legacy of Victorian computing pioneer Ada Lovelace.

    Ever subscribed to a mailing list by mistake? Booked travel insurance without noticing? Then you’ve fallen for a Dark Pattern.

    This week on the podcast we investigate the murky world of Dark Patterns: user interfaces that use psychological techniques to trick us into doing things we might otherwise not do.

    And as a new exhibition dedicated to Ada Lovelace opens at the Science Museum, we find out why the Victorian computing whizz is the hottest ticket in town 200 years on.

    Nathalie Nahai is joined by digital product designer Cennydd Bowles, Channel 4 News tech journalist Geoff White, designer Dan Lockton and Science Museum curator Tilly Blyth.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/oct/22/dark-patterns-ada-lovelace-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. 5by5 | On the Grid #114: Falling Flat

    On the Grid

    Thinking out loud about design weekly.

    If you’d like to discuss an episode or article, check out our sub-reddit

    And if you enjoy our recommendations, subscribe to our newsletter: Two Things

    Hosted by Andy Mangold, Dan Auer, and Matt McInerney.

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    http://5by5.tv/onthegrid/114

    —Huffduffed by djilleffect

  7. Ten years of Google Maps – Tech Weekly podcast

    On this week’s Tech Weekly podcast, we mark Google Maps’ 10th anniversary – yes, it has been 10 whole years since digital maps hit the mainstream and banished the A to Z from people’s bags.

    Gary Gale from the UK’s Ordnance Survey joins us down the line to talk about the company’s mapping initiatives around digital maps and where maps go next – indoors.

    Plus professor Mark Graham from the Oxford Internet Institute discusses how the geographies of the internet have reconfigured how people engage with the city.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/feb/11/tech-weekly-podcast-10-years-of-google-maps

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Episode 576: When Women Stopped Coding

    Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men.

    But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing.

    But in 1984, something changed. The number of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged.

    Today on the show, what was going on in 1984 that made so many women give up on computer science? We unravel a modern mystery in the U.S. labor force.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  9. Ladies In Tech with Jenn Lukas

    Jenn Lukas drops by to talk about her initiative, Ladies in Tech. We discuss her first speaking experiences, what prompted her to begin Ladies in Tech, gender disparity in our industry and what we think could be done about it. We also discuss her addiction to Tumblr, how to decide the best CMS for a project, and latest updates from CMSes we’re following!

    http://ctrlclickcast.com/episodes/ladies-in-tech

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Anki robotics founder Boris Sofman on why it’s a small leap from zippy toys to self-drive cars

    This week on Tech Weekly with Aleks Krotoski we discuss the reasons behind a rush by the UK government to get new data laws on the statute before the summer recess of parliament. Aleks speaks to Jim Killock executive director of the Open Rights Group about the dangers of rushing such important legislation and why this might endanger our civil liberties and rights as consumers.

    Aleks is also joined by the Guardian tech team in the form of Samuel Gibbs and Shiona Tregaskis to discuss Amazon’s recent application in the US to test out its drone delivery system Prime Air and Guardian games editor Keith Stuart give his top five tips for those who have just returned to the world of gaming and are nervous about picking up a controller.

    Finally Guardian technology editor Charles Arthur meets Boris Sofman, founder of the robotics company Anki. Boris discusses the recent launch of his Anki Drive toy cars and why the technology running is not so different to the technology behind Google’s self-drive car.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2014/jul/16/anki-robotics-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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