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Clampants / Tim Lynch

Adjunct professor of theoretical linguistics from an imaginary university in a run down warehouse somewhere.

There are twelve people in Clampants’s collective.

Huffduffed (1028)

  1. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Time Travel

    Time plays such a big part in our lives, it’s no wonder we’re fascinated by the idea of escaping it. And what better way to escape it that to travel back into the past or forward into the future? This hour, we explore our obsession with time travel. Why is such a recurring them in movies and TV shows? And what can time travel teach us about ourselves?

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/time-travel

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Can Robots be Truly Intelligent?

    From Skynet and the Terminator franchise, through Wargames and Ava in Ex Machina, artificial intelligences pervade our cinematic experiences. But AIs are already in the real world, answering our questions on our phones and making diagnoses about our health. Adam Rutherford asks if we are ready for AI, when fiction becomes reality, and we create thinking machines.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0548s57

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. The Future of Emotional Machines - SXSW 2017

    Imagine a stuffed animal that alters its behavior in response to a child’s emotional state, a commercial that changes based on a customer’s facial expression, or a device that can actually create feelings as though you were experiencing them naturally. This is the next giant step in the relationship between humans and technology: emotionally aware computers and social robots that recognize, respond to, and even influence our emotions. Because emotion is such a core aspect of who we are, these technologies will eventually be able to respond to our needs before we’re even aware of them ourselves. But how will they change us and what will be the unintended consequences of emotional machines?

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/the-future-of-emotional-machines-sxsw-2017?in=clampants/sets/sxsw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 19 Apr 2017 12:31:08 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. Episode 1: Imagining The Impossible

    How do we imagine the impossible? On today’s episode, we talk to physicists and writers (and writer-physicists) about this question. Along the way, we’ll touch on a range of topics, from how to detect gravitational waves to how the hippies saved physics, from the history of science to the metaphors of science, from the birth of the universe to the creation of poetry about the birth of the universe.

    Featuring David Kaiser (physicist, MIT), Rae Armantrout (Pulitzer Prize-winning poet), Freeman Dyson (physicist and writer), and Brian Keating (astrophysicist, UC San Diego).

    Links:

    David Kaiser’s How the Hippies Saved Physics

    Rae Armantrout’s Partly: New and Selected Poems, 2001-2015

    Freeman Dyson’s Birds and Frogs: Selected Papers, 1990-2014

    Summary and visualizations of the LIGO detection of gravitational waves

    The Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination on Facebook and Twitter

    Music:

    “Silmarillion,” “Lunar,” “Interludes,” and “Clockticks,” by Tapeworm Collective

    “Hallon,” by Christian Bjoerklund

    “A Strange Adventure,” by The Tleilaxu Music Machine

    “nostalgia of an ex-gangsta-rapper,” by deef

    “Industrial Swamp Singularity,” by Zreen Toys

    “Serpico Goes to Shanghai (1970s version tension),” by Keshco

    “Slow Lights,” by Lee Rosevere

    “Night Lights,” by Ketsa

    Email us at info@imagination.ucsd.edu

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-1-imagining-the-impossible/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. BBC Discovery: The City that Fell into the Earth

    How do you move a city? Lesley Riddoch travels to Arctic Sweden to find out. Kiruna is gradually sliding into Europe’s biggest iron ore mine. The city has to be rebuilt two miles away. That requires an extraordinary blend of planning, architecture, technology and stoicism. If anyone can do it then it’s the Swedes.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04dnmlj

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. CBC Ideas: Generation Mars, Part 1

    The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We’ll be driven by a desire to find life — or what remains of it — and to colonize the planet. Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving — and living — on the Red Planet.

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/generation-mars-part-1-1.3812284

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. The man who lost touch – Science Weekly podcast

    What happens without proprioception, our innate ability to know where and how our body is moving through space? And what can we learn from those who have lost it?

    When he was 19 years old, Ian Waterman contracted a viral fever that would change his life forever. This week, we hear his story. Featuring friend, collaborator, and neurologist Professor Jonathan Cole, and World-renowned choreographer and dancer Siobhan Davies CBE, we also hear Ian’s story, as told through their eyes.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2016/sep/27/the-man-who-lost-touch-science-weekly-podcast

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Can we build AI without losing control over it? | Sam Harris

    Scared of superintelligent AI? You should be, says neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris — and not just in some theoretical way. We’re going to build superhuman machines, says Harris, but we haven’t yet grappled with the problems associated with creating something that may treat us the way we treat ants.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate

    Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

    Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nt3edWLgIg
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 21 Oct 2016 12:54:49 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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