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Clampants / Tim Lynch

Adjunct professor of theoretical linguistics from an imaginary university in a run down warehouse somewhere.

There are twelve people in Clampants’s collective.

Huffduffed (1036)

  1. Are We Living in a Simulation?

    Elon Musk thinks we definitely could be, and it seems he is not alone. The idea that we might simply be products of an advanced post-human civilisation, that are simply running a simulation of our universe and everything it contains, has taken hold over the last few years. Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by comedian Phill Jupitus, Philosopher Professor Nick Bostrom and Neuroscientist Professor Anil Seth to ask what the chances are that are living in some Matrix like, simulated world and more importantly, how would we ever know?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08zb4d8

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Radio Atlantic: Ask Not What Your Robots Can Do for You

    Our increasingly smart machines aren’t just changing the workforce; they’re changing us. Already, algorithms are directing human activity in all sorts of ways, from choosing what news people see to highlighting new gigs for workers in the gig economy. What will human life look like as machine learning overtakes more aspects of our society?

    Alexis Madrigal, who covers technology for The Atlantic, shares what he’s learned from his reporting on the past, present, and future of automation with our Radio Atlantic co-hosts, Jeffrey Goldberg (editor in chief), Alex Wagner (contributing editor and CBS anchor), and Matt Thompson (executive editor).

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/radio-atlantic-ask-not-what-your-robots-can-do-for-you/535929/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. The Institute of Arts and Ideas: A Goldilock’s World | Chiara Marletto, Bernard Carr, Massimo Pigliucci

    Copernicus and Darwin taught us to be skeptical of feeling we were special. Yet from the size of the electron to the cosmological constant our universe is strangely fine-tuned for life. Is this a spectacularly fortuitous accident? Has the universe been tailored for us or do the theories just make it look that way?

    New York philosopher Massimo Pigliucci, M-Theorist and author of Universe or Multiverse? Bernard Carr, and Oxford constructor theorist Chiara Marletto wonder why we are here.

    https://soundcloud.com/instituteofartandideas/a-goldilocks-world

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Undiscovered: Mouse’s Vineyard

    An island associated with summer rest and relaxation is gaining a reputation for something else: Lyme disease. Martha’s Vineyard has one of the highest rates of Lyme in the country. Now MIT geneticist Kevin Esvelt is coming to the island with a potential long-term fix. The catch: It involves releasing up to a few hundred thousand genetically modified mice onto the island. Are Vineyarders ready?

    http://www.undiscoveredpodcast.org/mouses-vineyard.html

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Hay Festival 2017: Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry - Myth Makers

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldeWcG-Yfjo&t=10s
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 28 Jul 2017 15:20:30 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. Neil Gaiman in Conversation with Junot Díaz

    In conversation with novelist and Pulitzer Prize winner Junot Díaz, celebrate the release of Gaiman’s magnum opus with the author. Join DC All Access Live at 7PM EST and watch mythological history unfold before your eyes. With a special introduction from DC Co-Publisher Jim Lee, this promises to be an evening full of insight and surprises.

    New York Times best-selling writer Neil Gaiman returns to The Sandman with a prequel story to his trailblazing Vertigo series in The Sandman: Overture Deluxe Edition, out on November 10. Rendered in artist JH Williams III’s lush panoramas, The Sandman: Overture takes readers from the birth of the galaxy to Morpheus’s capture, before the events of The Sandman #1, and sheds new light on one of the towering masterpieces in comic book history.

    Pre-signed books will also be available for purchase from Community Bookstore at http//www.communitybookstore.net.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1kzdP3OlBg
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:57:12 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. The Complexities of UX Design in Health Settings | Anne Cooper talk video

    Collaborate Bristol - The South West’s leading UX and Design Conference: http://collaborateconf.com

    Talk by Anne Cooper at Collaborate Bristol 2017

    The Complexities of UX Design in Health Settings and the Impact of Human Factors

    This session explores the complexities of UX design in health settings with a particular focus on clinical safety, risk and human factors.

    Anne gives real life examples and explains the importance of excellent UX design in the health context.

    Anne is Chief Nurse at NHS Digital

    Collaborate Bristol is organised by Nomensa - the strategic UX design experts.

    Web: http://nomensa.com Work: http://nomensa.com/ux-services Blog: http://nomensa.com/blog Careers: http://nomensa.com/ux-careers

    Twitter: http://twitter.com/we_are_nomensa LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/nomensa Facebook: http://facebook.com/Nomensa Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/Nomensa

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M-EX41rAiU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:53:55 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Future Self : Invisibilia : NPR

    We all have a future self, a version of us that is better, more successful. It can inspire us to achieve our dreams, or mock us for everything we have failed to become.

    What do you want to be when you grow up? This is a question we ask children, and adults. In American culture the concept of the future self is critical, required. It drives us to improve, become a richer, more successful, happier version of who we are now. It keeps us from getting blinkered by the world we grew up in, allowing us to see into other potential worlds, new and different concepts, infinite other selves. But the future self can also torture us, mocking us for who we have failed to become. We travel to North Port, Florida, where the principal of a high school did something extreme and unusual to help his students strive for grander future selves - a noble American experiment that went horribly wrong.

    http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/533660783/future-self

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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