Tagged with “web” (14)

  1. Once Upon a Time in the Web | Andy Clarke | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Hold on there Bald Eagle. Why are we always in such a hurry? What’s the rush to reduce the number of clicks? Why not make people think? In movies, and in comic books, time and pace are as important as action. So in thirty short minutes, Andy Clarke investigates ways to stretch time using visual design to make more compelling web pages that keep people thinking — for longer.

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  2. The New Language of Web Design | Dan Rubin | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Our industry has aged into double digits, but much of the language we use to describe what we do and how things work is borrowed or repurposed, sometimes without issue, but often leading to confusion. Having a distinct set of terminology is an important sign of maturity for a line of work, those words and phrases to lead the next generation of practitioners — and it’s high time we set about creating it.

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  3. With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility | Elliot Jay Stocks | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Recent developments in web technologies like HTML5 and CSS3 have allowed us to build a richer web, full of advanced visual treatments like web fonts, animations, transformations, and drop-shadows. But have we got carried away with our new toys? Just because we can use a drop-shadow doesn’t mean we have to. In this new and often controversial talk, Elliot looks at solid design principles that will turn a good website into a great website, examines the scenarios where it’s better to stay away from unnecessary visual effects, and attempts to find the sweet spot in between the two extremes. "With great power comes great responsibility," said Uncle Ben, and Spidey hadn’t even used border-radius!

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  4. A New Canon | Mark Boulton | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    In the real world, responsive design is nothing new. Products adapt to our needs. Technology monitors local environments to adjust lighting, temperature and even physical spaces. But what about web? In designing with words, the desire to bind content to a device has been around as long as there have been books. Mark will take you from desire to implementation, from theory to practice. How can we build upon what we know from literally hundreds of years of responsive design practice to define a new era of online publishing? An era where we strive for the same level of human / technology connection that started with the monks.

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  5. Cure for the Common Font — A Web Designer’s Introduction to Typeface Selection

    Now that web designers suddenly face the challenge (and delight) of choosing fonts from an ever-growing selection, we thought it’s a good time to recommend some basic principles for making wise type choices.

    • Stephen Coles
    • Jason Santa Maria
    • Tiffany Wardle
    • Frank Chimero

    http://typographica.org/2011/on-typography/intro-to-typeface-selection/

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  6. Where Web Typography Goes To Next

    The future of web typography is as uncertain as any other aspect of the medium, but one thing is for sure: it’s got momentum. At no other time has typography been taken so seriously by so many involved in the web, and that means there’s an awful lot of change and innovation to keep up with if you want to stay on the cutting edge of online type. In as much depth as 60 minutes will allow, this presentation will cover recent proposals and additions to CSS 3, from ligatures to hyphenation, synthesis to capitalisation, and much in between. It will cover the reasoning behind the new aspects of CSS 3, and reintroduce older properties which only now are becoming implemented and useful (and thus browser support will not be ignored either). No session on web typography would be complete without discussion of webfonts. There is still much learn in this field, both in what CSS can provide, and the technical implementation within browsers. But web typography is not just about CSS, or even good type setting. The bit that touches us most closely is the medium through which most of us read: text rendering and screens, and this presentation will discuss and demonstrate the cutting edge of both. Web typography is a hugely exciting part of web design, and the field that is moving most quickly. This presentation will give you everything you need to know to keep right on the spur of the serif, the apex of the ascender, and the edge of the curve.

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  7. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

  8. Simple Steps to Great Web Design by Matthew Smith

    Creating beautiful web design is largely a matter of mastering a handful of simple techniques. The best designs employ systems of color, contrast, typography, and white space to achieve hierarchy, balance, and rhythm. The rest is just ingenuity and creativity. Matthew will review dozens of great and nearly great sites, explaining how to raise the bar on your next design.

    From http://sxsw.com/node/4855

    —Huffduffed by CanaryMason

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