Tagged with “web” (23)

  1. Dr. John Curran ‘Two tribes go to war. Dealing with conflict as part of Design’ - This is HCD - Human Centered Design Podcast - Omny.fm

    In this episode, I caught up with Dr. John Curran, a London-based anthropologist. Now, we met in Service Design Days in Barcelona where John was giving a keynote on conflict, and how important it is to deal with this conflict, not only in the design process but also the broader impact to the business itself.

    Links from episode

    Johns Service Design Days keynote

    John on Twitter

    Johns website

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    https://omny.fm/shows/this-is-hcd-human-centered-design-podcast/37-dr-john-curran-two-tribes-go-to-war-dealing-wit

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  2. Suze Ingram – Would you like service design with that?

    Service design is a new discipline which focuses on understanding what customers want, then designing services which meet their needs. Sound familiar? Web designers have focused on user-centred design for years to create websites and applications that are user friendly.

    Service design is well established in Europe and North America and there’s already a handful of Australian businesses offering service design. What is it? Does experience in designing for screen interaction translate to designing services too? Will service design be the next big thing? Suze offers insight by drawing on her years of experience as a UX designer and researcher. She shows how service design might fit into your business in the future, who you might pitch it to, and what sort of skills you might need to deliver service design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/suze-ingram-would-you-like-service-design-with-that/

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  3. Cyber Prophet William Gibson

    For all of the Internet era, and even before, novelist William Gibson has been the ultimate science fiction guru of the age. He invented the notion – the word – “cyberspace” before the Web even existed. He took us to dystopic futures that became nows in “Neuromancer,” “Burning Chrome,” and “Virtual Light.”

    Now, when whole lives – or big pieces – have migrated to the Web and beyond, Gibson is beyond as well. He’s watching the culture from new angles. We speak with Gibson about his latest novel, “Zero History,” and where our world – and his – stand now.

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/09/william-gibson

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  4. SpoolCast: Moving Beyond Static Forms with Luke Wroblewski

    Web forms are the mouth that feeds most web apps. There’s no way around that. Yet, few people are thinking about how to make one of the more unpleasant parts of the web more pleasant. The world’s foremost authority on web forms is Luke Wroblewski, author of the heralded book, Web Form Design.

    • Duration: 35m | 16 MB
    • Recorded: January, 2010
    • Brian Christiansen, UIE Podcast Producer

    From http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2010/02/11/spoolcast-moving-beyond-static-forms-with-luke-wroblewski/

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  5. Mobile First

    For years, most Web teams have designed for the desktop. Mobile, if it even happened, was a port off the desktop version, designed and built before anyone even considered the mobile experience. This made perfect sense for a while. Browsing the Web on mobile phones was painful; carriers controlled access to the Web on their devices; and mobile network speeds made everything often grind to a halt.

    But things have changed so dramatically over the past few years that starting with the desktop may be an increasingly backwards way of thinking about a Web product. Designing for mobile first can not only open up new opportunities for growth, it can lead to a better overall user experience for a Web site or application.

    In this presentation, Luke Wroblewski will dig into the three key reasons to consider mobile first: mobile is seeing explosive growth; mobile forces you to focus; and mobile extends your capabilities.

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

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