Tagged with “ux” (18)

  1. The value of consciously designed services « Service Design 2012

    We can get caught up in researching, designing and launching services, and totally forget the impact the conscious design of services is having on real people. Let this cease!

    Using stories from Australia and around the world, this talk provides tangible examples of the impact service design is having on customers, staff and organisations in a range of different sectors.

    Presented by Iain Barker

    http://www.uxaustralia.com.au/servicedesign-2012/the-value-of-consciously-designed-services

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  2. How to teach yourself service design: Three years of lessons learnt « Service Design 2012

    A couple of years ago we decided that our vision at Optimal Usability was to help transform New Zealand organisations into providers of world-class customer experiences. We quickly came to the conclusion that world-class experience is almost always across channels, and while we had done lots of projects with different channels, very few were about researching and designing the end-to-end experience.

    This was about the same time that service design was gaining some currency as an umbrella term for cross-channel customer experience.

    We figured that we really needed to bone up on what service design was, and how it applied to what we did. The resulting journey took us 3 years and we discovered a lot about how to “learn service design”. Some innovative approaches included spending 3 months doing service design on ourselves, interviewing CEOs of service design companies and conducting internal knowledge sharing sessions.

    In this presentation I’ll share our journey, our lessons and our mistakes; and give you some ideas that you can try.

    Presented by Trent Mankelow

    http://www.uxaustralia.com.au/servicedesign-2012/how-to-teach-yourself-service-design

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  3. Suze Ingram – Would you like service design with that?

    Service design is a new discipline which focuses on understanding what customers want, then designing services which meet their needs. Sound familiar? Web designers have focused on user-centred design for years to create websites and applications that are user friendly.

    Service design is well established in Europe and North America and there’s already a handful of Australian businesses offering service design. What is it? Does experience in designing for screen interaction translate to designing services too? Will service design be the next big thing? Suze offers insight by drawing on her years of experience as a UX designer and researcher. She shows how service design might fit into your business in the future, who you might pitch it to, and what sort of skills you might need to deliver service design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/suze-ingram-would-you-like-service-design-with-that/

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  4. #19 What makes a company like Clearleft successful? A conversation with Andy Budd — Perspective FM Podcast

    This week Jon and Dan are joined by Andy Budd form Clearleft - a well known UX Design agency based in Brighton. Clearleft are well known for their high quality of work as well as advancing the field by putting on a number of UX, Design and Development events around the country.

    https://www.perspective.fm/podcasts/19-what-makes-a-company-like-clearleft-successful-a-conversation-with-andy-budd

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  5. Don’t Be a UX Designer — Users Know

    In this episode, Kate and Laura bitch about some of the most annoying things about being a UX Designer and do everything in our power to keep you from becoming one. You’ll thank us later. Music: The Future Soon by Jonathan CoultonDrink Pairing: anything with bitters

    https://www.usersknow.com/podcast/2015/8/13/dont-be-a-ux-designer

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

  6. Bruce McCarthy – UX and Product Roadmaps » UIE Brain Sparks

    Bruce: UX people are, I have found, highly, highly leveraged in those early days of testing your assumptions. I’ve done this over and over again, actually. We did it at NetProspex, and we are doing it right now with a startup that I founded called Reqqs, reqqs.com. It’s a product for product managers that helps them with prioritizing and road mapping.

    What we did early on with that product was to first do a bunch of research with product managers to understand their problems, and when they ask for features to ask them why they wanted them. Get those problems boiled down to the essential few, which, with product managers, it turned out, the worst problems are prioritizing and road mapping.

    Both the decision-making part and the communications and getting-everybody-bought-in parts of that process. Then the whole question was, “Do we have a solution to those problems? Do we have something that will actually provide value in those problems over and above the alternatives,” which right now, for most product managers are Excel and PowerPoint.

    So we did mock-up after mock-up. I walked users through those mock-ups. We set them up in a clickable fashion. So you could go from one page to the next as though it were a real product with real data.

    Kept optimizing it based on the feedback that we were getting and to the point where we had something that was in HTML and clickable and apparently responsive, even though there was no database behind it, that people said, “Yeah, this is great. If I could put my real data in, this is exactly what I would want.” Then we went from there into producing the real code.

    We used a whole bunch of the front-end code. Not all of it, but a lot of it. Similarly, at NetProspex, I was building a tool for salespeople that was basically a search tool for contact information. It was for telephone salespeople, for what they call BDRs, who just make lots and lots of outbound phone calls all day long and make appointments for salespeople.

    This was a quick lookup-tool, essentially, for getting the right contact information for somebody you wanted to reach. We had a whole team of these BDRs. We had 25 of them at NetProspex in-house. So I said, “Perfect. I will produce a clickable mock-up and I will put it in front of them and see what they think.” I learned a huge amount by doing that.

    Then after we got beyond the clickable mock-up stage and into early prototypes, but the UI was still very minimal, I would put it in front of them have them actually use it in their job and see where it did or didn’t work for them. I quickly learned to keep the UI simple.

    It actually helped me reduce the feature count that we needed in order to get into our first release. Because I discovered that some of the advanced features that I thought people would think were really cool, that the salespeople couldn’t figure out how to use them. So we just got them, and we had a better product for it.

    https://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2015/07/08/bruce-mccarthy-ux-and-product-roadmaps/

    —Huffduffed by BenjaminParry

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