vickis / vicki saunders

There is one person in vickis’s collective.

Huffduffed (6) activity chart

  1. Deborah Schultz - It’s the people, stupid!

    The most interesting problems on the web are social, not technical. Once the open, social stack moves into wide use, the real work is going to be on us to create ongoing experiences that inspire, inform, evolve. Avoid this talk if you want to hear about monetizing community, gaming the newest social site for a quick spike in your user numbers, or how to get a [insert cutting edge social platform] strategy for your brand. Instead, we’ll diagram (sentence-like) real examples of marketing and revising (reviving?) web products for connected consumers. Think of it as Mind Hacks for Web Marketers. We’ll show you how sites like Dogster, Etsy, Moo, Photojojo and others parlay initial passions into deep, sustained, active communities. People-powered thinking extends well beyond messaging. Instead, we’ll preach a connected style of marketing that addresses a range of operational areas, both coming & going. We’ll pay particular attention to what happens after launch, as we think an attentive to and fro is the intimate secret of success. Deborah Schultz is a thought leader and innovator on the impact and adoption of Internet technologies and the power of technology to connect society, culture and business. She speaks and consults on the cultural and economic impact of the Internet, and specifically where our social and technological networks overlap. She currently serves as Procter

    —Huffduffed by vickis

  2. The War for the Web

    Tim O’Reilly Web 2.0 Conference 23 minutes, 11mb, recorded 2009-11-17

    The early days of the internet were truly astonishing. As people came to comprehend the power of networked information, they seized the many opportunities for innovation created by the open architecture of the web. Of course, the browser wars also showed that threats to openness and interoperability were a real danger. Today, Tim O’Reilly worries that escalating competition between large companies and closed platforms may drive the web towards a battle ground of locked down services and proprietary data.

    As large, powerful players have emerged on the internet landscape, you don’t have to look far to see some troubling skirmishes between opposing forces. O’Reilly touches on several examples where well known web applications include features designed to limit flexibility and user choice. To some extent, limits may be necessary to protect privacy, but in some cases, there is clear intent to lock in users at the expense of the competition. The situation is even more extreme in the mobile arena.

    Will the large companies play by the cherished rules of the open web as we’ve known it? It may depend on how "the cloud" grows. As web service companies such as Amazon, Google, Apple and Microsoft make O’Reilly’s notion of the web 2.0 "internet as a platform" a reality, they will have choices on how to maneuver. There is pressure for the giants to forge alliances, and leverage unique services as weapons to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. But, history has shown that internet success often comes if you "do what you do best, link to the rest". O’Reilly urges companies to stick to their core strengths, maintain an open architecture, and embrace the "small pieces loosely joined" philosophy.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4317.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed

    —Huffduffed by vickis

  3. Design for the Wisdom of Crowds

    People are often dumb, so how can crowds be wise? James Surowiecki laid the groundwork in his book, "The Wisdom of Crowds." In this solo presentation, Derek Powazek will apply those ideas to the web, concentrating on how to design websites that empower people to work together to create something truly awesome.

    Derek Powazek Grand Poo-Bah, Powazek Productions

    —Huffduffed by vickis

  4. Catherine O’Hara - CBC Q: the Podcast 2009-12-28

    From http://www.cbc.ca/q/pastepisodes.html

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  5. What Will Change Everything?

    Big science thinker John Brockman asked scientists around the world one question: what breakthrough will change everything? We’ve got their answers.

    —Huffduffed by vickis

  6. Grant Robinson – Visualising the user experience | Web Directions

    Designing for dynamic web applications and mobile devices poses a new set of challenges. Web designers are increasingly being asked to apply their skills to where the page model no longer applies. We need new ways of exploring the user experience and communicating behaviours involving sub-page changes and movement.

    Enter rapid prototyping. Widely acclaimed as one of the best ways to create great user experiences, it isn’t without its own pitfalls. This session will discuss the pros and cons of different prototyping techniques, and introduce a new technique called “screenflows” that focuses on visualising the user experience. Discover how to combine the best of paper prototyping, wireframes and HTML prototyping into one simple and effective prototyping technique. Learn how using this method can dramatically decrease the need for documentation, while increasing the speed and agility of the development process.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/grant-robinson-visualising-the-user-experience/

    —Huffduffed by vickis