Tagged with “sxsw” (65) activity chart

  1. Bruce Sterling Closing Remarks - SXSW Interactive 2013

    Acclaimed science-fiction writer Bruce Sterling will again deliver the Closing Remarks at SXSW Interactive. Sterling’s state-of-the-industry, state-of-the-world rants are one of the true highlights of the event, so don’t miss the 2013 version (vision).

    https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/bruce-sterling-closing-remarks

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Everything Is a Remix, so Steal Like an Artist

    While many have described the new world of remix culture where “nothing is original,” few have provided practical advice for those of us who find ourselves living and making things in it. Join filmmaker Kirby Ferguson (creator of the video series EVERYTHING IS A REMIX) and artist Austin Kleon (author of NEWSPAPER BLACKOUT and STEAL LIKE AN ARTIST) as they show clips from Kirby’s work and discuss how one best goes about being a creator in the digital age.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Browser Wars V: The Angry Birds Era

    The browser wars panel has been an SxSW institution, and gives us a forum to bring browser vendors to to the table to take stock of new developments on the web. As in years past, we’ll bring Mozilla (Firefox), Google (Chrome), Microsoft (IE), Opera (Opera), and maybe Apple (Safari) to the table to speak of developments on the web, and to share their unique perspectives as those who make the platforms on which the web is viewed.

    Our tag line this year places tongue firmly in cheek. Interesting chatter continues about applications on the web. What’s the story with browser-based app stores? While we’re at it, microdata has been embraced by Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo, but the web seems underwhelmed by schema.org. And why hasn’t HTML5 video changed our lives already, and why aren’t there any real peer-to-peer apps on the web yet? And, is WebGL ready or just sodden in hype? We’ll get candid on this panel, and take stock of the era of modern browsers, mobile apps, and Angry Birds.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP12185

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. SXSW 2012: The Ultimate Bruce Sterling Talk

    This is Bruce Sterling’s closing talk from SXSW 2012 Interactive.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Homeless Hotspots: Exploitation Or Innovation? : NPR

    An advertising agency sparked controversy at the South by Southwest technology conference when it hired homeless people in Austin to act as "Homeless Hotspots." Critics charge that it exploits the homeless. But Megan Garber, a staff writer for The Atlantic, sees some good in the project.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/03/13/148528071/homeless-hotspots-exploitation-or-innovation

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Faster Design Decisions with Style Tiles

    With responsive design designers need to rethink the process they go through to work with clients and developers to create successful visual designs. Rather than creating traditional comps, style tiles are a deliverable that help you to communicate with your client, establish a visual language and work iteratively with developers. In this presentation, Samantha will explain how to reinvent your process to leverage Style Tiles as a deliverable.

    Samantha Warren is an experienced designer, speaker, and writer who leverages a diverse background in artistic mediums to create compelling and functional web experiences. Focused on designing for content, she is passionate about using the web as a vehicle to tell compelling stories while creating accessible user-experiences. She has been published in .net Magazine and has presented at various industry events, including Design Day in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania and the South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin Texas.

    Currently Samantha is the Design Director at Phase2 Technology where she uses her past experience working with brands like National Geographic and Choice Hotels International to help non-profits, publications, and associations tell their stories online.

    In her personal time she talks about design and the web on her blog, BadAssIdeas.com and spends time with her cross-eyed cat, Grace.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP10133

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

    UX designer Amber Case will share insights from her research in cyborg anthropology and talk about what really makes us human.

    Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist currently working at Vertigo Software. She founded CyborgCamp, a conference on the future of humans and computers. Her main focus is on mobile software, augmented reality and data visualization, as these reduce the amount of time and space it takes for people to connect with information. Case founded Geoloqi.com, a private location sharing application, out of a frustration with existing social protocols around text messaging and wayfinding. She formerly worked at global advertising agency. In 2010, she was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the Most Influential Women in Tech.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP992057

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Teaching Touch: Tapworthy Touchscreen Design

    Discover the rules of thumb for finger-friendly design. Touch gestures are sweeping away buttons, menus and windows from mobile devices—and even from the next version of Windows. Find out why those familiar desktop widgets are weak replacements for manipulating content directly, and learn to craft touchscreen interfaces that effortlessly teach users new gesture vocabularies.

    The challenge: gestures are invisible, without the visual cues offered by buttons and menus. As your touchscreen app sheds buttons, how do people figure out how to use the damn thing? Learn to lead your audience by the hand (and fingers) with practical techniques that make invisible gestures obvious. Designer Josh Clark (author of O’Reilly books "Tapworthy" and "Best iPhone Apps") mines a variety of surprising sources for interface inspiration and design patterns. Along the way, discover the subtle power of animation, why you should be playing lots more video games, and why a toddler is your best beta tester.

    Josh Clark, Principal, Global Moxie

    I’m a designer specializing in mobile design strategy and user experience. I’m author of the O’Reilly books "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps" and "Best iPhone Apps." My outfit Global Moxie offers consulting services and training to help media companies, design agencies, and creative organizations build tapworthy mobile apps and effective websites.

    Before the interwebs swallowed me up, I worked on a slew of national PBS programs at Boston’s WGBH. I shared my three words of Russian with Mikhail Gorbachev, strolled the ranch with Nancy Reagan, hobnobbed with Rockefellers, and wrote trivia questions for a primetime game show. In 1996, I created the uberpopular "Couch-to-5K" (C25K) running program, which has helped millions of skeptical would-be exercisers take up jogging. (My motto for fitness is the same for user experience: no pain, no pain.)

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP10988

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Why Mobile Apps Must Die

    Mobile apps are on a clear trajectory for failure. It’s just not possible to have an app for every device in my house, every product I own and every store I enter. Much like Yahoos original hierarchy gave way to Google’s search. Applications have to give away to a ‘just in time’ approach to applications.

    This talk will explain how applications must give way to a more universal approach to application distribution, one based on the mobile web and cloud services. The problem of course, is that the mobile web has both hands tied behind its back. Any mobile app today is locked away behind a browser ghetto: in effect, a sub OS inside a larger mobile OS.

    This isn’t just an arbitrary technology debate, a just-in-time approach to application functionality can unleash entirely new sets of application, ones which are impossible with native apps.

    This talk will layout how this problem can be fixed, and what changes need to take place, outside of just HTML5, for it to happen.

    Scott Jenson, Creative Dir, frog design

    As frog’s Creative Director, Scott Jenson was the first member of the User Interface group at Apple in the late 80s, working on System 7, the Apple Human Interface guidelines and the Newton. After that, he was a freelance design consultant for many years, then director of product design for Symbian, and finally managed the mobile UX group at Google. You can follow frog Creative Director Scott Jenson on Twitter @scottjenson.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP12580

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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