tribehut / tags / ux

Tagged with “ux” (6) activity chart

  1. Emotional Design for the World of Objects

    Welcome to the world of atoms. Remember when the mantra was that bits were more important than atoms? That we could dispense with physical things because information was all that mattered? Well, that was nonsense then and it is nonsense now.

    The human body is part of the physical world. It savors touch and feeling, movement and action. How else to explain the popularity of physical devices, of games that require gestures, and full-body movement?

    Want to develop for this new world? There are new rules for interacting with the world, new rules for the developers of systems. But the new rules still follow the old principles. Let’s not throw away the old lessons of interaction. In fact, these become even more important than ever before. And yes, there are some new things to learn as well, new technologies to master, new words to learn.

    Today the need is for complex, rich, emotionally satisfying things. It is no longer just about function and service. Those are still important, but they are taken for granted. Today we must add convenience and comfort, fun and excitement, pleasure. We needed to develop applications that both delivered real value but also was high in emotional value, experience, and engagement.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/don-norman

    Dr. Don Norman is the author or co-author of fourteen books, with translations into sixteen languages, including: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and The Invisible Computer. Business Week has called this the bible of the ‘post PC’ thinking. His latest book, Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things marks the transition from usability to aesthetics, but with the emphasis on a well-rounded, cohesive product that looks good, works well, and gives pride to the owner. The well-rounded product, says Don, will enhance the heart as well as the mind, being a joy to behold, to use, and to own.

    —Huffduffed by tribehut

  2. Stephanie Sullivan Rewis and Greg Rewis – What Designers Need to Know About HTML5 and CSS3 » UIE Brain Sparks

    The introduction of CSS3 and HTML5 brings with it a host of new capabilities. With most modern browsers supporting CSS3 and HTML5, implementing them into your designs is becoming easier. Understanding what is now possible with these new standards can help you create better designs more efficiently and effectively than ever before.

    —Huffduffed by tribehut

  3. Dan Rubin – CSS3 for Everyone » UIE Brain Sparks

    Incorporating CSS3 into your designs allows you to create innovative designs with less code and reliance on images. The level of compatibility with many of the browser options out there is already impressive and it continues to grow. Taking advantage of the new CSS3 features helps to shift heavier visual elements to the browser itself.

    —Huffduffed by tribehut

  4. Andy Budd: Mastering web user experience

    Andy tells us the best practices to employ when building your site for your target audience. Also discover what it takes for your designs to stand out.

    http://www.dormroomtycoon.com/andy-budd/

    —Huffduffed by tribehut

  5. UX in the UK: Gerry Gaffney interviews Andy Budd | Information & Design

    —Huffduffed by tribehut

  6. Ethan Marcotte – The How and Why of Responsive Web Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    —Huffduffed by tribehut