tobestobs / collective / tags / user experience

Tagged with “user experience” (10) activity chart

  1. Beyond Mobile: Making Sense of a Post-PC World

    Native applications are a remnant of the Jurassic period of computer history. We will look back on these past 10 years as the time we finally grew out of our desktop mindset and started down the path of writing apps for an infinite number of platforms. As the cost of computation and connectivity plummets, manufacturers are going to put ‘interactivity’ into every device. Some of this will be trivial: my power adaptor knows it’s charging history. Some of it will be control related: my television will be grand central for my smart home. But at it’s heart, we’ll be swimming in world where every device will have ‘an app’. What will it take for us to get here, what technologies will it take to make this happen?

    This talk will discuss how the principles of the open web must apply not only to prototocols but to hardware as well. How can we build a ‘DNS for hardware’ so the menagerie of devices has a chance for working together?

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/jenson/

    Scott Jenson used to work at Apple, developing the Human Interface guidelines and working on the Newton, no less. He also worked at Symbian and Google so he knows all about mobile devices of all kinds.

    Scott is currently Creative Director at Frog Design where he has been writing about the coming zombie apocalypse.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Human Traffic

    Denise and George want to talk to you about a few community-based projects they’ve worked on. They’ll delve into strategies and ideas around building a sense of place, and discuss the dynamics they have observed by watching people get comfortable… so comfortable there’s a sense of ownership and possession.

    http://2007.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Experience Strategies

    Engage in a deep dive into the importance of experience. In this session Peter will cover the historical perspective; lay out the evolution of product categories; demonstrate the competitive advantage that experience provides; explain the importance of thinking about your products in a systems fashion; and cap it off with a discussion of experience strategies and how they can provide stars to sail your ship by.

    http://2007.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. The Dawning of the Age of Experience

    Experience design is no longer a nice-to-have luxury of a few organisations with tons of money and exceptional visionary management. It’s become commonplace for organisations that build products and websites. Experience Design is a centerpiece of boardroom discussions and quickly becoming a key performance indicator for many businesses.

    However, you can’t just hire a couple of ‘experience designers’ and tell them, “Go do that voodoo that you do so well.” Today’s business environment forces us to build multi-disciplinary teams, compiling a diverse group of skills and experiences to handle the many facets of the technical, business, and user requirements.

    In his usual entertaining and insightful manner, Jared will talk about what it takes to build a design team that meets today’s needs. See how successful experience design integrates the needs of the users with the requirements of the business. See how it is learned, but not available through introspection. Learn how experience design must be invisible to succeed and why it is cultural, multi-disciplinary, and thrives best in an ‘educate and administrate’ environment.

    http://2007.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. Designing the Complete User Experience

    Design is hard. The Web is complicated. How do we make things for people when all we have are the most basic understanding of what they want? Join Jeffrey Veen as he takes a broad survey of the challenges designers face today, and how we’re all solving those problems with new perspectives on user research, interaction design, and information architecture.

    http://2006.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. What is Web 2.0?

    User experience designer and upcoming author, Andy Budd, discussed how the web is moving from a document delivery system to an application platform. Andy attempted to define what Web 2.0 really means and looked at some of the technologies and applications making this transition possible.

    http://2005.dconstruct.org/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  7. Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

    Addiction or devotion? The complexity of our relationships between connected experiences, devices and people is increasing. Stanley Kubrick once said a film “should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what‛s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later”.

    Design ethnographer Kelly Goto presents underlying emotional indicators that reveal surprising attachments to brands, products, services and devices. Gain insight on designing user experiences that map to people‛s real needs and desires.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kelly-goto

    As an evangelist for ‘design ethnography’, Kelly Goto is dedicated to understanding how real people integrate products and services into their daily lives. Goto is Principal of gotomedia, LLC, a global leader in research-driven, people-friendly interface design for web, mobile and product solutions for clients including Seiko Epson Japan, Adobe, NetIQ, WebEx and CNET. Her book, Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works, is a standard for user-centered design principles. Goto is also the editor of gotomobile.com, a leading online publication on mobile user experience and serves on the national board of the AIGA Center for Brand Experience.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. Emotional Design for the World of Objects

    Welcome to the world of atoms. Remember when the mantra was that bits were more important than atoms? That we could dispense with physical things because information was all that mattered? Well, that was nonsense then and it is nonsense now.

    The human body is part of the physical world. It savors touch and feeling, movement and action. How else to explain the popularity of physical devices, of games that require gestures, and full-body movement?

    Want to develop for this new world? There are new rules for interacting with the world, new rules for the developers of systems. But the new rules still follow the old principles. Let’s not throw away the old lessons of interaction. In fact, these become even more important than ever before. And yes, there are some new things to learn as well, new technologies to master, new words to learn.

    Today the need is for complex, rich, emotionally satisfying things. It is no longer just about function and service. Those are still important, but they are taken for granted. Today we must add convenience and comfort, fun and excitement, pleasure. We needed to develop applications that both delivered real value but also was high in emotional value, experience, and engagement.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/don-norman

    Dr. Don Norman is the author or co-author of fourteen books, with translations into sixteen languages, including: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and The Invisible Computer. Business Week has called this the bible of the ‘post PC’ thinking. His latest book, Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things marks the transition from usability to aesthetics, but with the emphasis on a well-rounded, cohesive product that looks good, works well, and gives pride to the owner. The well-rounded product, says Don, will enhance the heart as well as the mind, being a joy to behold, to use, and to own.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  9. Experience and the Emotion Commotion

    The competitive environment for technology is changing, and its impact on experience design is deep: capabilities, features, and functions are no longer enough. Emotional engagement will distinguish successful consumer experiences of the future. Designing in this world requires we change the way we think about people and products. This presentation provides a brief overview of a counter-intuitive emotional design approach and its application to one of the hallmarks of the next phase in interaction design: Natural User Interface.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/augustdelosreyes/

    August de los Reyes is the Principal Director of User Experience for Microsoft Surface, a team dedicated to pioneering natural and intuitive ways to interact with technology.

    August is a member of the Advanced Studies Program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design where he received an MDesS with Distinction for his research in product design and emotion. A guest design faculty member at the University of Washington, he was a 2007-2008 visiting associate at the Oxford Internet Institute. He is working on his next book entitled The Poetics of Everyday Objects.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  10. Loving Your Player With Juicy Feedback

    The games we love also love us back — mostly, by reflecting our successes and failures in delicious ways. This talk will explore the concept of feedback in game design, using examples drawn from both personal & professional experience. We’ll examine a variety of feedback mechanisms (good and bad), and discuss how lessons drawn from these examples can be applied to any user experience.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/robinhunicke/

    Robin is a Game Designer and Producer who specializes in new IP aimed at reaching new players. Her titles include MySims and Steven Spielberg’s BAFTA award-winning BOOM BLOX franchise — both made for Nintendo Wii. She recently joined thatgamecompany, whose recent Playstation Network releases Flow and Flower are celebrated for their beauty, whimsy and zen-like economy of action.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct