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Huffduffed (29) activity chart

  1. Remy Sharp Still Building Web Pages with HTML 5

    While at NDC, Carl and Richard talk to Remy Sharp about HTML 5. Remy discusses the state of things, how the diversity of browsers is as much a strength as a problem. He digs into the idea that you need to build your web app for the audience you have - perhaps it needs more support for older browsers, or focus on the latest features for the newest browsers. Check out the great collection of links to different services and sites that Remy mentions in the discussion!

    Remy Sharp is the founder and curator of Full Frontal, the UK based JavaScript conference. He also runs jQuery for Designers, co-authored Introducing HTML5 (adding all the JavaScripty bits) and is one of the curators of HTML5Doctor.com.

    Whilst he’s not writing articles or running and speaking at conferences, he runs his own development and training company in Brighton called Left Logic. Generally speaking, he’s about as crazy about JavaScript, HTML & CSS as a squirrel is about his nuts during the winter!

    http://www.dotnetrocks.com/default.aspx?showNum=781

    —Huffduffed by telsner one year ago

  2. The Web Ahead #25: Responsive Images with Mat Marquis

    What’s the best way to handle responsive images? There’s been a lot of discussion flying around over the last many months, big debates and fast changes… where have we landed? What’s coming in the future? Responsive Images Community Group chair Mat Marquis joins Jen Simmons to sort it all out.

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/25

    —Huffduffed by telsner one year ago

  3. The System Of The World

    http://adactio.com/journal/1541/

    —Huffduffed by telsner one year ago

  4. We Evolved To Eat Meat, But How Much Is Too Much? : The Salt : NPR

    Scientists agree we evolved to eat meat, but some of us may be pushing the limits of consumption. Paleo diet enthusiasts believe meals should be more like early man’s, but modern doctors disagree.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/06/25/155588094/we-evolved-to-eat-meat-but-how-much-is-too-much

    —Huffduffed by telsner one year ago

  5. Bruce Sterling: The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole - The Long Now

    One reason lots of people don’t want to think long term these days is because technology keeps accelerating so rapidly, we assume the world will become unrecognizable in a few years and then move on to unimaginable. Long-term thinking must be either impossible or irrelevant.

    The commonest shorthand term for the runaway acceleration of technology is “the Singularity”—a concept introduced by science fiction writer Vernor Vinge in 1984. The term has been enthusiastically embraced by technology historians, futurists, extropians, and various trans-humanists and post-humanists, who have generated variants such as “the techno-rapture,” “the Spike,” etc.

    It takes a science fiction writer to critique a science fiction idea.

    Along with being one of America’s leading science fiction writers and technology journalists, Bruce Sterling is a celebrated speaker armed with lethal wit. His books include The Zenith Angle (just out), Hacker Crackdown, Holy Fire, Distraction, Mirrorshades (cyberpunk compendium), Schismatrix, The Difference Engine (with William Gibson), Tomorrow Now, and Islands in the Net.

    The Seminar About Long-term Thinking on June 10-11 was Bruce Sterling examining “The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole.” He treated the subject of hyper-acceleration of technology as a genuine threat worth alleviating and as a fond fantasy worth cruel dismemberment.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02004/jun/11/the-singularity-your-future-as-a-black-hole/

    —Huffduffed by telsner one year ago

  6. Alain de Botton: A kinder, gentler philosophy of success

    Alain de Botton examines our ideas of success and failure — and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments. Is success always earned? Is failure? He makes an eloquent, witty case to move beyond snobbery to find true pleasure in our work.

    Through his witty and literate books — and his new School of Life — Alain de Botton helps others find fulfillment in the everyday.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/alain_de_botton_a_kinder_gentler_philosophy_of_success.html

    —Huffduffed by telsner 2 years ago

  7. Joanne McNeil on online introversion and curation

    Joanne McNeil, a science and technology writer living in Brooklyn, New York, and curator of Tomorrow Museum, a collection of images and speculative essays exploring how technology, science, and economics are affecting the fine arts, discusses online introversion and curation. McNeil discusses realspace introverts turned online extroverts, explains the lack of social media presence of many extroverts and celebrities, and parses the distinction between shyness and introversion. She also talks about Hanoi Wi-Fi and other technology encountered on her recent trip to Southeast Asia and addresses online curation, link blogs, and Tumblr.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2010/10/04/joanne-mcneil/

    —Huffduffed by telsner 2 years ago

  8. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

    —Huffduffed by telsner 2 years ago

  9. Breaking Down Walls, a Decentralised Social Web?

    The web is founded on open, decentralised principles. This means anyone can build a site that can link to any other, without any need for proprietary technology. No one owns e-mail, usenet or http, but social services like Facebook and Twitter are—for the most part—silo’d businesses with their own networks and proprietary APIs. You can join them together in code, but they’re not in any way ‘interoperable’.

    This panel will explore why large and centralized seems to dominate, whether it’s a bug or a feature. We’ll take a critical eye at new attempts at building distributed social web products like Diaspora. We won’t be focusing on the technical specifications as much as the end user experience and the business models that could support them. If a distributed service wouldn’t be fun, easy to use or profitable, then is there really any point in building one…?

    Evan Prodromou, CTO, StatusNet Inc

    Founder and creator of the StatusNet open source social platform, Evan is the co-chair of the W3C’s working group on federated social web technologies.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11746

    —Huffduffed by telsner 2 years ago

  10. The Secret Lives of the Brain at SXSW Interactive 2012

    If the conscious mind—the part you consider you—is just the tip of the iceberg in the brain, what is all the rest doing? Neuroscientist David Eagleman, author of the New York Times bestseller Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, shows that most of what you do, think and believe is generated by parts of your brain to which you have no access. Here’s the exposé about the non-conscious brain and all the machinery under the hood that keeps the show going.

    http://lanyrd.com/2012/sxsw-interactive/spphh/

    —Huffduffed by telsner 2 years ago

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