Tags / twitter:user=bryanrieger

Tagged with “twitter:user=bryanrieger” (2) activity chart

  1. Adaptation

    Four years ago the prospects for the global economy were generally looking up (the subprime lending crisis was still emerging), George W. Bush was still in office, and Apple Computer had just released their soon to be iconic iPhone 1.0 (sans AppStore). It might be blatantly obvious, but since then you may have noticed things have changed a little?

    If you follow the mainstream tech media you might be inclined to believe that the majority of people around the world have a bleeding-edge, state-of-the-art smartphone (or supercomputer); and those that don’t plan to acquire one as-soon-as-possible. After all, who wouldn’t want the power of an iPhone 5GSExtreme or a Moto Android Nexus Infinity-and-Beyond in their pocket?

    This presentation is for those of you who live in the real world. Those with families, mortgages and of course businesses that need to engage with all those wonderful folk (please don’t call them users) who have a very capable (but not bleeding-edge) device sitting in their pocket, purse, or any other place people keep their magical devices.

    Presented by Bryan and Stephanie Rieger at the Breaking Development Conference held in September 2011 in Nashville, TN.

    —Huffduffed by bdconf 2 years ago

  2. Letting Go

    Design (or if you prefer—user experience) is at a crossroads. In our globalized, hyper-connected world, users no longer need to wait for us to create experiences for them. As we debate the value of design thinking, the usefulness of the next API, or strive to craft the ultimate cross-platform experience—users are sorting this out on their own, using whatever service or technology is “good enough” for them at the time.

    Strategies and scenarios that made sense mere months ago, are disintegrating as technologies shift, business models crumble, and we watch with dismay as users exchange tips to disable JavaScript on their Kindles, or access multiplayer Flash games on the iPads.

    What happens to your brand, your product, and your bottom line when users choose “good enough”, over your carefully crafted product or service? Is it a sign of failure, a missed opportunity, or a chance to dive head first towards a new reality?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/bryan-stephanie-rieger

    Bryan Rieger is a designer, writer and reluctant developer with a background in theatre design and classical animation. Bryan has worked across various media including print, broadcast, web and mobile; and with clients such as Apple, Microsoft and Nokia.

    Stephanie Rieger is a writer, designer, and closet anthropologist with a passion for the many ways people interact with technology. With a diverse background, Stephanie’s expertise lies in marrying design, technology, and business goals to craft simple, elegant experiences.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct 2 years ago