Tags / responsive

Tagged with “responsive” (155) activity chart

  1. Brad Frost – Creating Responsive Interfaces » UIE Brain Sparks

    Brad: Yeah. I think that, yeah, more or less, that’s it.

    Molecules are a couple tags stitched together. You might have just a search form that’s comprised of search label, an input, and a button, and that is a self-contained little assembly of stuff that does something.

    Atoms by themselves, the tags are all really abstract and floating around in space. You don’t really see, inherently, just from looking at that level, how these things might be useful. It’s like, “Well, that’s nice.” It’s helpful at an at-a-glance sort of level. Then you start combining them into these little packages, these little molecules, and now they could actually start doing something.

    You might have your primary navigation as a molecule, your search form as a molecule, and stuff like that, and then you put those molecules together into a header organism. Now your header organism contains your logo atom and contains your navigation molecule, it contains your search-form molecule, and all those things operate at this standalone, reusable component.

    From there, then you start stitching these organisms together and finally start building these sort of page-level things, like templates and then, ultimately, pages, which we don’t have to get into.

    The idea is that you have these little clusters of elements, and then you combine those together into more complex clusters of stuff. The whole idea is to basically establish this really sound, really deliberate interface, where everything is being built up with the intention of creating a system that’s built for reuse, built for scalability.

    Certainly helps with responsive design because, again, you’re able to treat these problems at the component level rather than at a page level. Also, just from being future-friendly — you’re establishing these nice rules and guidelines and constraints, and this goes inside of this, which means that the new hire you hire four months down the line can understand how things are put together and why things are put together in the way that they are.

    I think that in my experience using this and helping create this, what we’re doing now, why we’re doing this, is that it’s no longer feasible to just throw over a handful of page templates to a client and just say, “Here’s your site. Have a nice day. Make sure I get my final paycheck.” It’s not enough to do that anymore. We have to be a lot more deliberate with this.

    We have to give them better tools, better resources, so that we don’t come back next year and, all of a sudden, they’ve changed the color of green and they’ve put this thing next to this thing and they’ve created a bunch of new code all on their own, in different patterns and stuff, and it all looks like a big, giant, Frankenstein mess.

    In part, that’s your fault if that happens, simply because you didn’t give them the library of components, you didn’t give them the building blocks, the LEGO bricks, so that if they need to add a new section to the site. If they need to add another widget, or an organism or component or whatever you want to call it, they have a language to choose from and make informed decisions. I think that that’s really, really cool.

    In fact, one of the clients that we first did this on — actually, the very first client that I introduced this whole atomic-design, Pattern Lab concept — was TechCrunch. I was actually just on their site last night and noticed that they had added a different component to the site. You read the article, and then there was an extra little “You might also like” sort of thing.

    Now, we had our own version of that, and that’s still there, but then they added a separate “You might also like these stories.” What I found is that they used the interface patterns that we provided them to construct an entirely new module.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/16/brad-frost-creating-responsive-interfaces/

    —Huffduffed by ideasatrandom 3 months ago

  2. 098: With Lyza Danger Gardner - ShopTalk

    This week we were joined by Lyza Danger Gardner.

    We talked about (roughly in order):

    News’n’Links’n’Drama:

    12:33 Web Standards Killed The HTML Star, and Is Web Design Dead?

    21:40 Grunt is dead? What about Gulp?

    Q & A:

    27:04 I’m curious to know how we as a community are handling touch events on mobile devices at the moment? Specifically referring to dropdown/fly-out menus. Is there a popular jQuery/JS library you’d recommend?

    35:15 Every now and then, my job requires me to code an html email template. I usually have to look online to see what email clients can and can’t handle, but lately I’ve been getting a lot of contradictory answers. Is there a CanIUse.com for emails?

    40:05 Is it possible to (and how can one) avoid code redundancy / DRY violations when supporting non-media query browsers like IE8 and below during responsive design implementation?

    50:37 Can you explain a bit about what Compass is, how to use it, and what makes it so great?

    58:34 What are the benefits of having a responsive design vs a separate mobile site?

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/098-lyza-danger-gardner/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  3. Jason Grigsby – Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind » UIE Brain Sparks

    Jason is joining us to teach one of the daylong workshops in Denver, CO April 7-9 as part of the UX Immersion Mobile Conference. For more information about Jason’s and 5 other workshops, visit uxim.co.

    With the mobile web, specifically m dot sites increasingly becoming a thing of the past, responsive web design has become common practice. The ability for your site to display across screen sizes and devices, reduces development time and allows for one design to work anywhere. However, this shouldn’t signal a shift away from mobile-first thinking.

    Jason Grigsby, of Cloud Four, believes that there are considerations that responsive design alone doesn’t address. The total experience of your site is more than just what it looks like. Simply using media queries to optimize your site’s design for different page widths is not a viable solution. Page weights, image sizes, and network speeds all need to be factored into the equation.

    In Jason’s mind, performance is a key differentiator. He says that you can have a beautiful design or the perfect user experience, but if your performance is bad, people won’t use it. Sites that look good and work well on the desktop may feel slow and bloated on a mobile device. Starting with performance in mind and considering mobile-first avoids these problems early in the process.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/07/jason-grigsby-responsive-web-design-with-mobile-in-mind/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  4. Ben Callahan – Structuring Your Workflow for Responsive Web Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    As responsive web design becomes more prevalent, our approach to designing for the web is changing. With former assumptions, as dismissive as they may have been, that the web was a fixed width, it was easier to have a more linear workflow. With the need for the web to reconfigure and adapt to different devices and displays, designers and developers need to adapt to changing workflows.

    Ben Callahan of Sparkbox has experienced this changing landscape firsthand. He has found that even down to the core of how they price projects has changed with responsive work. The fact that their development and design process have continued to get more iterative and collaborative has had a ripple effect on all aspects of projects. This has allowed clients to become more involved in the process.

    Ben says that getting the client involved from the beginning helps shape the scope and phases of the project. They try to learn as much as they can to inform what it is they’ll do next. He says that his team has really tried to embrace the idea and approach clients with “The understanding that we know less about your project today, then we will tomorrow”.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2013/12/17/ben-callahan-structuring-your-workflow-for-responsive-web-design/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 months ago

  5. Trent Walton – Dorm Room Tycoon

    In this interview, Trent Walton co-founder of Paravel explains the impact responsive web design has had on his design process.

    http://drt.fm/trent-walton/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 months ago

  6. The Godfather of Responsive Web Design - Ethan Marcotte | The Breaking Development Podcast | Fresh Squeezed Mobile brought you by Breaking Development

    Fresh Squeezed Mobile is Breaking Development’s channel to get fresh ideas out there about mobile web development and design.

    http://fsm.bdconf.com/podcast/the-godfather-of-responsive-web-design-ethan-marcotte?utm_campaign=bdw-43-2013

    —Huffduffed by patrickhawley 4 months ago

  7. The Non-Breaking Space Show | Interviews with the web’s best and brightest

    The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web.

    http://nonbreakingspace.tv/jeremy-keith/

    —Huffduffed by samkap 4 months ago

  8. The Non-Breaking Space Show | Interviews with the web’s best and brightest

    Jared Spool is a writer, researcher, speaker, educator, and an expert on the subjects of usability, software, design, and research. He is the founding principal of User Interface Engineering, a research, training, and consulting firm specializing in website and product usability, and the largest usability research organization of its kind in the world.

    —Huffduffed by samkap 5 months ago

  9. 5by5 | The Web Ahead #3: Jeremy Keith on Everything Web

    Jeremy Keith joins Jen to talk about Mobilewood, future-friendlying websites, responsive design techniques, digital preservation, html5 semantics, Firefox 7, and much more.

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/3

    —Huffduffed by ctdesign 5 months ago

  10. Understanding How Stuff Works Together With Stephanie Rieger | The Breaking Development Podcast | Fresh Squeezed Mobile brought you by Breaking Development

    Fresh Squeezed Mobile is Breaking Development’s channel to get fresh ideas out there about mobile web development and design.

    http://fsm.bdconf.com/podcast/understanding-how-stuff-works-together-with-stephanie-rieger

    —Huffduffed by adewale 6 months ago

Page 2 of 16