Tags / book:author

Tagged with “book:author” (1531) activity chart

  1. Andrew Clarke and guests have Unfinished Business

    A weekly discussion show about the business end, the sharp end of web, design and creative industries.

    On this week’s Unfinished Business I’m joined by not one, but two guests to keep me out of trouble, Laura Kalbag and marathon runner Rachel Andrew. We talk about the fallout from last week’s news that publisher Five Simple Steps has closed, what this means for other niche publishers and for the authors who write for them.

    We talk about how the abrupt announcement of the closure could’ve been handled better and the lessons we might learn to help us in the future. Finally, we break down how advances and royalties work differently between small and large publishers and the reasons why authors might choose a publisher over self-publishing their books.

    http://unfinished.bz/64

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 days ago

  2. The Web Ahead #66: Web Components with Peter Gasston

    Web Components seem to be taking the JavaScript community by storm. The three parts of this technology give developers a chance to define their own HTML elements, adjust the defaults, and share with others. Learn about it all from Peter Gasston.

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/66

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 days ago

  3. William Gibson: The New Cyber/Reality

    The man who coined the term "cyberspace," science fiction writer and futurist William Gibson joins The Agenda to discuss the new cyber-reality and where the human race might be headed next.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 days ago

  4. On Point: Neil Gaiman’s Newest ‘Overture’

    Norman Mailer called it “a comic strip for intellectuals.” Best-selling author Neil Gaiman joins us with his dark, new series on the origins of “The Sandman.”

    “The only people who inveigh against escape are jailers,” J.R.R. Tolkien famously said. The world’s premier artist of escapism today may be Neil Gaiman. Neil Gaiman wrote “The Sandman,” the dark, epic fantasy praised by connoisseurs as the greatest comic book – 75 issues long – ever written. He’s heaped with sci-fi and horror prizes – the Hugo, the Nebula, the Bram Stoker – but also with children’s prizes, the Newbery and more. He’s a literary rock star who also takes the stage – and mines our deep, dark veins. Up next On Point: storytelling rock star, Neil Gaiman.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/11/25/neil-gaiman-sandman-overture

    —Huffduffed by erhebung 5 days ago

  5. BBC Culture Studio Picks - Neil Gaiman

    Neil Gaiman, multi-award winning popular author, talks to Janice Forsyth about his latest book The Ocean at the End of the Lane, comics, graphic novels, Edinburgh, Doctor Who and much more.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/cspicks

    —Huffduffed by erhebung 5 days ago

  6. The Digital Human: Time

    Aleks Krotoski charts how digital culture is moulding modern living. Each week join technology journalist Aleks Krotoski as she goes beyond the latest gadget or web innovation to understand what sort of world we’re creating with our ‘always on’ lives.

    In this episode of the Digital Human Aleks Krotoski explores the influence of one of our most pervasive technologies - the clock, and asks if it’s the only way to experience time.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/dh

    —Huffduffed by adactio 6 days ago

  7. Christian Heilmann — TE; DL Too Easy, Didn’t Learn

    Keynote at jQuery Europe 2014.

    In the keynote, I tried to analyse the massive discrepancy between what we as web developers get and how happy we seem to be.

    We are an elite group in the job market: we are paid well, our work environment is high-tech and our perks make other people jealous. We even get the proverbial free lunches.

    And yet our image is that of unsatisfied, hard to work with people who need to be kept happy and are socially awkward. I was confused that a group with all the necessary creature comforts is not an example of how easy working together could be. Instead, we even seem to need codes of conduct for our events to remind people not to behave badly towards people of the other sex or cultural background. Are we spoiled? Are we just broken? Or is there more?

    I’ve found a few reasons why we can come across as unsatisfied and hard to handle and the biggest to me was that whilst we are getting pampered, we lack real recognition for what we do.

    When you get a lot, but you yourself feel you are not really doing much, you are stuck between feeling superior to others who struggle with things you consider easy and feeling like a fraud. Instead of trying to communicate out about what we do, how much work it involves and why we do things in a certain way we seem to flee into a world of blaming our tools and trying to impress one another.

    https://archive.org/details/TEDLTooEasyDidntLearn

    —Huffduffed by adactio one week ago

  8. Unfinished Business 63: From those wonderful folks who gave you Pearl Harbor

    Special guest Jeffrey Zeldman joins me on Unfinished Business this week to talk about how important is it today for designers to be able to tell stories and sell ideas to clients. We talk about whether designers need ‘empathy’ or strength of character and conviction in their ideas, whether the web needs ‘account menpeople and what it feels like when people you’ve mentored go their own way.

    It’s a packed show and as we both love advertising and Mad Men, we end by talking about my Don Draper depersonalisation disorder theory and what we expect and hope from the final season which starts next week. Even if you’ve not seen Mad Men, I think you’re going to like this episode.

    http://unfinished.bz/63

    —Huffduffed by adactio one week ago

  9. The Partially Examined Life: Sci-Fi and Philiosophy with David Brin

    Discussing David Brin’s novel Existence (2012) with the author.

    What’s the point of thinking? Brin sees the future as a pressing threat, and Existence speculates that the reason we don’t see evidence of life on other planets is that no species survives its technological adolescence. The solution? We need to be smarter than our parents and work to give our kids the tools to be smarter than we are. In the book, the ultimate hope comes from a concerted effort to develop and diversify the coalition of Earth’s intelligent life, to make “humanity” encompass more than just the biological humans that we currently are.

    In our present political difficulties, Brin sees the solution as positive-sum games: institutions like science and markets that (are supposed to) result in everybody benefiting overall. We need to keep elites (whether corporate or governmental) from screwing these games up, and to use technology to foster reciprocal accountability. The government is illicitly spying on people? Spy back and call them out when power is abused! Instead of vainly trying to hold back technology, just make sure that it’s not restricted to elites, that there can be effective debate re. its uses.

    The point of thinking for Brin is to “be a good ancestor.” Philosophy and science fiction can help through thought experiments that visualize the outcomes of our ideas and can help in developing scientific theories. Philosophy’s most Brin-approved task is to promote the critical argumentation needed for reciprocal accountability. The “examined life” is not just for navel-gazers, but for societies prone to catastrophic mistakes.

    http://www.partiallyexaminedlife.com/2014/03/26/ep90-david-brin/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 weeks ago

  10. The 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space

    Space exploration is entering a new era. Dozens of aerospace companies have emerged in recent years, all with the goal of commercializing space as never before. From serving NASA’s cargo needs to sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, this next generation of entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard, possibly creating the first-ever trillionaires.

    In this podcast, listen in on this discussion between a panel of entrepreneurs and space historians, including panelists Wanda M. Austin, president and CEO of The Aerospace Corporation; Michael Gold, director of DC operations and Business Growth at Bigelow Aerospace; John Logsdon, professor emeritus of Space Policy and International Affairs at George Washington University; Elliot Pulham, chief executive officer of the Space Foundation; Tom Shelley, president of Space Adventures Ltd; and Robert Walker, executive chairman of Wexler and Walker Public Policy Associates. Host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, led this lively conversation on what may be our real future in space.

    The 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on Wednesday, March 19, 2014.

    http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/the-2014-isaac-asimov-memorial-debate-selling-space-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 weeks ago

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