Tags / book:author=nick harkaway

Tagged with “book:author=nick harkaway” (5) activity chart

  1. Book Talk: Kate Summerscale / Nick Harkaway / Natasha Soobramanien interviews

    This special edition of Book Talk features three interviews recorded on location at Edinburgh International Book Festival last month.

    Kate Summerscale, author of the phenomenally successful The Suspicions of Mr Whicher discusses the results of her success and her new book, another fascinating piece of historical non-fiction, Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace.

    Angelmaker author Nick Harkaway talks about how being the son of John Le Carre meant being raised in ‘a house full of stories’, as well as going into detail about his own fiction writing.

    Lastly, debut novelist Natasha Soobramanien explains her fascination with islands and describes how years of life experience shaped her novel Genie and Paul.

    http://www.scottishbooktrust.com/podcasts/audio/book-talk-kate-summerscale-nick-harkaway-natasha-soobramanien-interviews

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  2. The Incomparable #5: Shakespeare is a Hack!

    Our Book Club reconvenes, to discuss Nick Harkaway, Cherie Priest, William Gibson, favorite prose stylists (Shakespeare? Please!), and multiple Shatners. Also in this episode, we introduce listeners to two new inanimate-yet-Incomparable characters: the Spoiler Horn and its good friend, the All-Clear Bell.

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  3. Guardian Books podcast: The future —€“ dystopia or utopia?

    Will our future be happy? Will we control our technology or will it control us? Writers Nick Harkaway and Simon Ings warn that we should not accept everything on offer. Ben Marcus’s new dystopian novel imagines what might happen if it all goes wrong.

    We’re in an age when technological fact is stranger than fiction – so why are so many novelists devoting themselves to exploring the frontiers of thought? Nick Harkaway explains why it’s the novelist’s job to imagine the future, and how "an act of taking the brakes off the imagination" could even help the world to make the right choices as we hurtle into the future. Simon Ings, editor of Arc, a new magazine devoted to imagining the future, explains the importance of speculative thinking and the sadness of the modern world.

    And Ben Marcus talks about the worst case scenario of his new novel, The Flame Alphabet, which imagines a dystopian future where adults are poisoned by the speech of their children, and in which words and writing, and even making signs, also become fatal.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2012/jun/08/future-dystopia-utopia-books-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  4. Nick Harkaway reading from The Blind Giant

    I’ve been a bit quiet here because there’s been so much going on, so I thought I’d post this – a snippet of me reading from The Blind Giant. Feel free to download it and share it around, that’s the idea. I should probably have tacked on an ident, but I didn’t – I’ll do that next time, but it feels kinda tacky, and this is a species of experiment. (i.e. if no one remotely cares, I probably won’t do much of it!

    http://www.nickharkaway.com/2012/05/blind-giant-audio-snippet/

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  5. The Digital Future

    On Start the Week Andrew Marr looks into the digital future. Nick Harkaway dismisses fears of a digital dystopia in which distracted people, caught between the real world and the screen world, are under constant surveillance. He believes we need to engage with the computers we have created, and shape our own destiny. Simon Ings is the editor of a new digital magazine, Arc, which uses science fiction to explore and explain what the future might hold for society. While Anab Jain’s design company uses scenarios and prototypes to probe emerging technologies and ideas, from headsets to help the blind to see, to everyday objects with their very own internet connection. And Charles Arthur investigates the battle for dominance of the internet with Apple, Google and Microsoft struggling to stay on top, and asks what that means for the rest of us.

    Start The Week sets the cultural agenda for the week ahead, with high-profile guests discussing the ideas behind their work in the fields of art, literature, film, science, history, society and politics.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/stw

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago