stewtopia / randy stewart

I’m a product manager for the Cheezburger Network in Seattle, WA.

There is one person in stewtopia’s collective.

Huffduffed (16) activity chart

  1. Write Your Own Thing with Marco Arment - The East Wing

    The East Wing is a podcast brought to you by Tim Smith, that talks with industry experts about design, solving problems and the keys to creating products with value.

    http://theeastwing.net/episodes/59

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 10 months ago

  2. 5by5 | CMD Space #48: A Fresh Start, with Marco Arment

    This week Myke is joined by Marco Arment.

    http://5by5.tv/cmdspace/48

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 10 months ago

  3. The Secret Lives of the Brain at SXSW Interactive 2012

    If the conscious mind—the part you consider you—is just the tip of the iceberg in the brain, what is all the rest doing? Neuroscientist David Eagleman, author of the New York Times bestseller Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, shows that most of what you do, think and believe is generated by parts of your brain to which you have no access. Here’s the exposé about the non-conscious brain and all the machinery under the hood that keeps the show going.

    http://lanyrd.com/2012/sxsw-interactive/spphh/

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  4. SXSW 2012: Go Forth & Make Awesomeness

    "Go Forth & Make Awesomeness: Core Values

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  5. SXSW 2012: The Ultimate Bruce Sterling Talk

    This is Bruce Sterling’s closing talk from SXSW 2012 Interactive.

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  6. Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

    UX designer Amber Case will share insights from her research in cyborg anthropology and talk about what really makes us human.

    Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist currently working at Vertigo Software. She founded CyborgCamp, a conference on the future of humans and computers. Her main focus is on mobile software, augmented reality and data visualization, as these reduce the amount of time and space it takes for people to connect with information. Case founded Geoloqi.com, a private location sharing application, out of a frustration with existing social protocols around text messaging and wayfinding. She formerly worked at global advertising agency. In 2010, she was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the Most Influential Women in Tech.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP992057

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  7. The Lean Startup: The Science of Entrepreneurship

    The Lean Startup debuted at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. This talk draws on stories and insights from the book, explaining the new science of entrepreneurship. Most startups fail. But many of those failures are preventable. The Lean Startup is a new approach being adopted across the globe, changing the way companies are built and new products are launched. Eric Ries defines a startup as an organization dedicated to creating something new under conditions of extreme uncertainty. This is just as true for one person in a garage or a group of seasoned professionals in a Fortune 500 boardroom. What they have in common is a mission to penetrate that fog of uncertainty to discover a successful path to a sustainable business. The Lean Startup approach fosters companies that are both more capital efficient and that leverage human creativity more effectively. Inspired by lessons from lean manufacturing, it relies on “validated learning,” rapid scientific experimentation, as well as a number of counterintuitive practices that shorten product development cycles, measure actual progress without resorting to vanity metrics, and learn what customers really want. It enables a company to shift directions with agility, altering plans inch by inch, minute by minute.

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  8. The Power of Fear in Networked Publics

    This solo presentation will cover the culture of fear and the consequences of visibility. Acclaimed researcher danah boyd will weave together the predator panic and bullying phenomenon with the socio-political dynamics around otherness, the rise of fear alongside the increased ability to connect with others around the globe, the empowering rhetoric of the Arab Spring along the rise of local networks of power. She will call into question some of our utopian assumptions about all of the automatic democratic possibilities of technology and offer a challenge to folks about the need to step out of our techno-bubble and engage with people who are fearful of technology.

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  9. Making the Real World Easier to Use

    The term "social media" is quickly becoming obsolete. The social graph is moving from our computers into the real world, and soon everything we experience will be overlaid with the thoughts and feelings of our friends. Early adopters are already starting to experience this phenomenon. For instance, foursquare alerts you when you’re near places that your friends like, and provides you with suggestions from your friends on what to experience at those places. Other companies are attempting to create this type of engagement with television shows ("10 of your friends are watching!") and music. In this session, Dennis Crowley, Co-founder and CEO of foursquare, will have a conversation about how mobile technology is accelerating the social graph’s move into the offline world, and how services like foursquare are taking this kind of augmented real-world exploration mainstream.

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

  10. The Nick Denton Interview: The Failure of Comments

    The internet was supposed to allow media outlets not only to display the talent of their writers — but to capture the intelligence of the audience. Remember that rhetoric? We’ve abandoned it; the most that publishers can claim is that their comments are not quite as bad as the competition’s. Trolls and spammers are not the problem. They can be dealt with by brute-force moderation. The real tragedy: the triumph of mediocrity. People with time on their hands drown out more valuable contributors. We’ve all designed discussion systems with the most avid commenters in mind. We’ve given them stars and moderating powers and allowed them to develop cliques and a sense of ownership that shades into entitlement. They are not the only readers. They are not even the smartest of our readers. If we’re truly to capture the intelligence of the audience, we need to design for the most intelligent of the audience.

    —Huffduffed by stewtopia 2 years ago

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