sabbatical / collective / tags / intellectual property

Tagged with “intellectual property” (8) activity chart

  1. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  2. The 3-D Printer - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    3-D printing techniques offer a chance to make manufacturing more efficient and flexible, but as we’ll hear they also pose challenges to traditional labour relations and to intellectual property rights.

    Guests:
    Tom Standage, Digital Editor, The Economist
    Bre Pettis, Co-founder of Makerbot Industries
    Michael Weinberg. Staff Attorney, Public Knowledge
    Professor Berok Khoshnevis, Engineering, University of Southern California

    Further Information:
    Economist article on 3-D printing (http://www.economist.com/node/18114221)
    Makerbot Industries website (http://www.makerbot.com/)
    Thingiverse website (http://www.thingiverse.com/)
    Centre for Rapid Automotated Fabrication Technologies (http://craft.usc.edu/Mission.html)
    Behrokh Khoshnevis profile (http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~khoshnev/)
    Public Knowledge website (http://www.publicknowledge.org/)
    Public Knowledge resources on 3D printing (http://www.publicknowledge.org/3d-printing-bits-atoms)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-3-d-printer/3667402

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 years ago

  3. Bruce Perens — Open Hardware Summit 2011

    "I’m a councillor to sick corporations and their disease is intellectual property"

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 years ago

  4. The Tuesday Podcast: Stealing Our Way To A T-Shirt : Planet Money : NPR

    It turns out it’s really hard for a small team of public radio employees to turn themselves into a cutting-edge apparel company.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2010/10/26/130838159/the-tuesday-podcast-stealing-our-way-to-a-t-shirt

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  5. Copyright and Science: A plea for skeptics

    By Lawrence Lessig.

    Talk given at Tokyo University October 5, 2009. This is a plea for scientists to be skeptical about presumptions about how IP should regulate it, and a bit about the work (the GREAT work) of Science Commons in this space.

    http://blip.tv/file/2693000

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 years ago

  6. Good Copy Bad Copy – Andreas Johnsen, Ralf Christensen & Henrik Moltke

    Ralf Christensen joins us this week to discuss his film Good Copy Bad Copy – co-directed with Andreas Johnsen and Henrik Moltke – a documentary debate investigating the opposing views to copyright and how it affects us all as the media we consume becomes ever more accessible.

    http://www.goodcopybadcopy.net/

    From: http://www.directorsnotes.com/2008/01/17/dn-ep-071-good-copy-bad-copy-andreas-johnsen-ralf-christensen-henrik-moltke/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 years ago

  7. Against Intellectual Property

    Copyrights and patents have come to be called “intellectual property,” a phrase which suggests that they are much akin to ordinary property. They are not: they are a government grant of monopoly power. The argument in favour of intellectual property must then be that these monopolies provide important offsetting incentives for innovation and creation.

    However, all the available evidence suggests that patents and copyrights are a failure, and inhibit innovation and creativity at least as much they encourage it.

    In this lively and entertaining lecture, Dr. David Levine documents the history of intellectual property, arguing that the best strategy for stimulating creativity in 21st century society is to eliminate copyrights and patents entirely.

    SFU/BMO Bank of Montreal Lecture Series

    http://www.sfu.ca/cstudies/mpprog/sfubmo_levine.htm

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 years ago

  8. The Public Domain: enclosing the commons of the mind

    James Boyle is professor of law and co-founder of the Centre for the Study of the Public Domain at Duke University and author of The Public Domain: enclosing the commons of the mind.

    In his new book The Public Domain, Professor James Boyle describes how our culture, science and economic welfare all depend on the delicate balance between those ideas that are controlled and those that are free, between intellectual property and the public domain —the realm of material that everyone is free to use and share without permission or fee

    Intellectual property laws have a significant impact on many important areas of human endeavour, including scientific innovation, digital creativity, cultural access and free speech. And so Boyle argues that, just as every informed citizen needs to know at least something about the environment or civil rights, every citizen in the information age should also have an understanding of intellectual property law.

    Is the public domain as vital to knowledge, innovation and culture as the realm of material protected by intellectual property rights? James Boyle thinks so and visits the RSA to call for a new movement to preserve it. If we continue to enclose the “commons of the mind”, Boyle argues, we will all be the poorer.

    From: http://uc.princeton.edu/main/index.php/component/content/article/28-all-videos/4228-the-public-domain-enclosing-the-commons-of-the-mind

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 years ago