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Tagged with “software” (19) activity chart

  1. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  2. A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

    The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.

    Join us at Columbia Law School as renowned security expert Bruce Schneier talks with Eben Moglen about what we can learn from the Snowden documents, the NSA’s efforts to weaken global cryptography, and how we can keep our own free software tools from being subverted.

    http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 months ago

  3. Can Software That Predicts Crime Pass Constitutional Muster?

    Typically, police arrive at the scene of a crime after it occurs. But rather than send cops to yesterday’s crime, a new trend in law enforcement is using computers to predict where tomorrow’s crimes will be — and then try to head them off.

    The software uses past statistics to project where crime is moving. Police in Los Angeles say it’s worked well in predicting property crimes there. Now Seattle is about to expand it for use in predicting gun violence.

    It all started as a research project. Jeff Brantingham, an anthropologist at UCLA, wanted to see if computers could model future crime the same way they model earthquake aftershocks. Turns out they can.

    "It predicts sort of twice as much crime as any other existing system, even going head-to-head with a crime analyst," Brantingham says.

    Checking The Boxes

    Older systems, like the famous CompStat in New York, show where crime has been. This system looks forward.

    "The model will actually predict other locations, that effectively say, even though there was a crime somewhere else in your environment, the risk is still greatest in this location today for the next 10 hours or the next 12 hours," Brantingham explains.

    Enlarge image Seattle police officer Philip Monzon patrols an area where the department’s predictive policing software has indicated car thefts are likely to occur.

    Martin Kaste/NPR Brantingham and his colleagues are now selling the predictive system to police departments with the name PredPol. At this point, you may be thinking about the sci-fi movie Minority Report. But this is different. No psychics sleeping in bathtubs, for one. More to the point, this doesn’t predict who will commit a future crime, just where it is likely to happen.

    In Seattle, police Sgt. Christi Robbin zooms in on a map of the city. Earlier this year, Seattle started using PredPol to predict property crimes. It’s now the first place to try predicting gun violence with the software.

    "These red boxes [on the map] are predictions of where the next crimes are likely to occur," Robbin explains.

    At the start of every shift, patrol cops are assigned to those red boxes. "So we’re asking that they spent the time in that 500-by-500-square-foot box, doing whatever proactive work they can to prevent that crime," Robbin says.

    On a recent shift, officer Philip Monzon pulls up inside his box; today, it’s a city block near the Seattle waterfront.

    "[The police] want visibility, they want contacts with businesses as are appropriate, and anyone who’s wandering through the area," Monzon explains.

    This area has parking lots, and PredPol’s forecast includes car thefts. As Monzon passes a green Honda, he pauses. The guy inside seems to be ducking under the dashboard.

    "[I] wanna make sure to see if he’s got the key or if he’s gonna pull out anytime soon," Monzon says.

    The car starts — the guy probably does have the key. But why didn’t Monzon challenge him, just in case?

    "I don’t really have enough — I’m not just going to single out one guy in a Honda," he explains.

    Computer Models And ‘Reasonable Suspicion’

    And this is where this gets tricky. The courts say police need "reasonable suspicion" in order to stop somebody. That suspicion can come from a lot of things — even someone’s "furtive movements," as police like to say.

    All Tech Considered Police May Know Exactly Where You Were Last Tuesday

    Around the Nation At LAPD, Predicting Crimes Before They Happen But can it come from the fact that someone is occupying an imaginary red box drawn by a computer?

    "Ah — no. No. I don’t know. I wouldn’t make a stop solely on that," Monzon says.

    That’s probably the right answer, says Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, a law professor at the University of the District of Columbia who has taken a special interest in the constitutional implications of PredPol. He says the departments using it have told police not to use it as a basis for stops. But he also wonders how long that can last.

    "The idea that you wouldn’t use something that is actually part of the officer’s suspicion and not put that in — [that] may come to a head when that officer is testifying," Ferguson says. Either that officer will have to omit the fact that he or she was prompted by PredPol, he says, or that officer will admit it on the stand. "Then the issue will be raised for the court to address."

    And it may be that PredPol is a constitutional basis for stopping someone. Some might consider it more objective than an individual police officer’s judgment — less prone to racism or other kinds of profiling, for example.

    Ferguson says that argument may have merit, but that police and society still need to be careful.

    "I think most people are gonna defer to the black box," he says. "Which means we need to focus on what’s going into that black box, how accurate it is, and what transparency and accountability measures we have [for] it."

    In other words, even though computers aren’t biased, the statistics feeding it might be. And if police are going to follow an algorithm, we should at least be willing to check the math.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda 8 months ago

  4. The Big Web Show #84 with Dalton Caldwell

    Dalton Caldwell, CEO and co-founder of App.net, is Jeffrey Zeldman’s guest in Episode No. 84 of The Big Web Show, sponsored by Happy Cog.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/84

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  5. Spark with Nora Young: Terms of Service Activism

    Blogging pioneer, and former Spark guest, Anil Dash argues when companies push for intrusive Terms of Service, users need to push back. He speaks with Nora Young about why we should become Terms of Service activists and whether governments need to get involved to help companies stay in line.  

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/full-interviews/2012/09/12/terms-of-service-activism/

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  6. How To Be A Brilliant Project Leader

    Mike Clayton shares insights from his latest book: Brilliant Project Leader.

    http://www.guerrillaprojectmanagement.com/how-to-be-a-brilliant-project-leader

    —Huffduffed by briansuda 2 years ago

  7. Design Critique: Products for People

    Encouraging useful and usable designs for a better customer experience. /

    http://designcritique.net/dc79-interview-author-giles-colborne-of-simple-and-usable-web-mobile-and-interaction-design

    —Huffduffed by briansuda 2 years ago

  8. Richard Stallman talking about Copyright in the digital age at University of Sussex on 8 March 2011

    A talk by Richard Stallman, the pioneer of the CopyLeft movement, at the University of Sussex. Stallman was speaking on the need to reform a copyright system which has outgrown the historical circumstances of its creation and now serves the mega corporations, such as Disney, as opposed to the majority of the population.

    Stallman’s talk is broad-ranging, from E-Book readers (“The Amazon Swindle”) through the Sony rootkit fiasco to redefining copyright terms based on the category of the work (utilitarian: no copyright; art: copyright — 10 years?). He was polemical in his call for a complete destruction of the record companies that deserve nothing more than obliteration for their complicity in attempting to take away users’ freedoms.

    A high point was, in my mind, the argument on schools breeding dependence upon proprietary software. While this demonstrates the fact that, for Stallman, almost every ethical principle can be deduced from parallels in the realm of free software, his argument did, at the end of the day, work: would you let a drug dealer inject children free of charge (gratis) so that, when they leave, they will be hooked on an expensive product?

    More text and original file from here:

    https://www.martineve.com/2011/03/09/richard-stallman-at-the-university-of-sussex/

    This recording is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives license. It was made by Martin Eve.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  9. A Little Bit Pregnant: Why it’s a Bad Idea to Regulate Computers the Way We Regulate Radios, Guns, Uranium and Other Special-Purpose Tools - Cory Doctorow

    In his keynote speech Cory addresses the issue of computer regulation in general and, more specifically, asks: What happens when we take the failed regulatory model from the copy-right realm and try to import it into other realms too? What are the consequences?

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/a-little-bit-pregnant-cory-doctorow-at-boundaries-frontiers-and-gatekeepers-ischool-conference/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  10. TummelVision 47: Tom Coates on Yahoo!, social software, and being a proto-tummler

    Tom Coates has been blogging and working on social software since well before either of them got that name. He cares very much about making the web a suitable place for people to live in, and has been doing so with Barbelith, UpMyStreet, BBC Radio, The Open Rights Group, Yahoo Brickhouse and FireEagle. He even started a blog about Tummeling called Everything in Moderation 8 years ago.

    From http://tummelvision.tv/2011/01/06/tummelvision-47-tom-coates/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

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