procload / tags / internet

Tagged with “internet” (10) activity chart

  1. BBC - Podcasts - Four Thought: Russell M. Davies 21 Sept 2011

    Four Thought talks include stories and ideas which will affect our future, in politics, society, the economy, business, science, technology or the arts. Recorded live, the talks are given by a range of people with a new thought to share.

    After the internet and social media, what will be the next technological revolution? Writer, blogger and social entrepreneur Russell M. Davies argues that like the early days of blogging, we are about to witness another flowering of individual creativity. This time, he says, it will unleash "all sorts of interesting gadgety things", and determine our relationships with them. "It’s about making your own stuff, which might be a bit silly and a bit trivial and pointless, but you get the satisfaction of making it yourself," he says. This revolution in individual gadgetry - and designing our relationship with them - will prove "exciting, radical, life-affirming stuff". Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/fourthought

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  2. Daniel Suarez: Daemon: Bot-mediated Reality

    Forget about HAL-like robots enslaving humankind a few decades from now, the takeover is already underway. The agents of this unwelcome revolution aren’t strong AIs, but “bots”– autonomous programs that have insinuated themselves into the internet and thus into every corner of our lives. Apply for a mortgage lately? A bot determined your FICA score and thus whether you got the loan. Call 411? A bot gave you the number and connected the call. Highway-bots collect your tolls, read your license plate and report you if you have an outstanding violation.

    Bots are proliferating because they are so very useful. Businesses rely on them to automate essential processes, and of course bots running on zombie computers are responsible for the tsunami of spam and malware plaguing Internet users worldwide. At current growth rates, bots will be the majority users of the Net by 2010.

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  3. Infinite Jest and the Internet

    David Foster Wallace’s 1996 novel Infinite Jest imagines a not-too-distant future in which the equivalents of Hulu and Netflix streaming kill the advertising business to such an extent that the government decides to save the economy with "sponsored time": hence, a great deal of the novel’s action takes place in the "Year of the Depend Adult Undergarment." The book is deeply (if hilariously) pessimistic about people’s chances of connecting with one another in a culture built on one-way media consumption — this pessimism, of course, is represented most baldly by The Entertainment, a technology-enhanced movie so entertaining that anyone who once sees it becomes incapable of doing anything other than watching it over and over again. This panel will, broadly speaking, address the question of whether David Foster Wallace was or would have been a Clay Shirky fan. In other words, would (did) Wallace believe that the Internet is better for us than TV because we are active participants in the creation of Internet content? Why are the digerati enamored of Infinite Jest, and what can the book tell us about the Internet’s potential to help or hinder human connection?

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  4. The Spendiferous Story of Archive Team

    Jason Scott’s talk at the Personal Digital Conference, 2011.

    http://www.archiveteam.org/archives/media/

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  5. Alex Payne - The Machine Starts

    How Computers and the Internet are Re-programming Human Behaviour.

    http://www.themachinestarts.com/read/26

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  6. James Bridle — Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book

    The internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

    James Bridle is a publisher, writer and artist based in London, UK. He founded the print-on-demand classics press Bookkake and the e-book-only imprint Artists’ eBooks, and created Bkkeepr, a tool for tracking reading and sharing bookmarks, and Quietube, an accidental anti-censorship proxy for the Middle East. He makes things with words, books and the internet, and writes about what he does at booktwo.org.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/james-bridle-wrangling-time-the-form-and-future-of-the-book/

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  7. Pique Web - Episode 1

    Our first cast, with guest Jon Tan. Paul talks to Jon about Analog, type, fonts, and how they’re changing on the web.

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  8. Clay Shirky at O’Reilly Media Gov 2.0 Summit

    In 2009, Apps For Democracy invited people to freely create applications using raw data generated by the federal government. Within 30 days there were over 40 working applications produced, and Apps For Democracy continues to be a success. However the 2005 L.A. Times wikitorial regarding the War in Iraq ended up at the opposite extreme in less than 48 hours, as debates turned into "flame wars" and indecent disrespect.

    Clay Shirky discusses the difference between these efforts to engage the public, and briefly unpacks three important points to keep in mind when attempting to harness collaborative participation: The nature of the "Contract with the Users"; the need to accomodate the unpredictability of the users; and the danger of "Heisenberg’s press release".

    Shirky also weaves in an experiment by Uri Gneezy and Aldo Rustichini published in The Journal of Legal Studies on how the absence of clarity or firmness of clarity affects users behavior.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4411.html

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  9. Interactive Podcasts: Simple Steps to Great Web Design

    Creating beautiful web design is largely a matter of mastering a handful of simple techniques. The best designs employ systems of color, contrast, typography, and white space to achieve hierarchy, balance, and rhythm. The rest is just ingenuity and creativity. Matthew will review dozens of great and nearly great sites, explaining how to raise the bar on your next design

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  10. Interactive Podcasts: The Revenge Of Editorials

    As the Internet has accelerated the creation of all types of content, it’s become more and more difficult to sift through that content and find something of quality. We’ve tried it with machines and even mass consensus but the results are either wrong or lowest common denominator. The irony in all this is that we really need other humans to help us. The vast breadth of content on the Web only highlights what we’ve always relied upon: the valued opinion of others.

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