Tagged with “change” (11) activity chart

  1. David Deutsch: Chemical scum that dream of distant quasars

    Legendary scientist David Deutsch puts theoretical physics on the back burner to discuss a more urgent matter: the survival of our species. The first step toward solving global warming, he says, is to admit that we have a problem.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/david_deutsch_on_our_place_in_the_cosmos.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Ockham’s Razor - 17 April 2011 - The Titanic disaster and global warming

    Arthur Marcel lectures at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane and in today’s talk he compares the circumstances surrounding the sinking of the Titanic to issues surrounding global warming.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/ockhamsrazor/stories/2011/3191637.htm

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. Dyson on Heresy, Climate Change, and Science

    Freeman Dyson of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about science, his career, and the future. Dyson argues for the importance of what he calls heresy—challenging the scientific dogmas of the day. Dyson argues that our knowledge of climate science is incomplete and that too many scientists treat it as if it were totally understood. He reflects on his childhood and earlier work, particularly in the area of space travel. And he says that biology is the science today with the most exciting developments.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Science Weekly: End of the World News

    We talk to the BBC’s David Shukman about reporting climate change and the BP oil spill. Plus, the results of the Guardian’s hack day, a study on mobile phone masts and cancer, and the pitfalls of patenting genes.

    A gaggle of geeks recently invaded the Guardian’s London headquarters for a hack day. Their leader, Jeremy Keith, reveals the results of two days of brainstorming.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/audio/2010/jun/28/science-weekly-podcast-david-shukman

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Michael Mann - Unprecedented Attacks on Climate Research

    For the scientists who study global warming, now is the winter of their despair.

    In the news, it has been climate scandal after alleged climate scandal. First came “ClimateGate,” then “GlacierGate,” “Amazon Gate,” and so on. In public opinion polls, meanwhile, Americans’ acceptance of the science of global warming appears to be declining. Even a freak snowstorm now seems to sow added doubt about this rigorous body of research.

    In response to growing public skepticism—and a wave of dramatic attacks on individual researchers—the scientific community is now bucking up to more strongly defend its knowledge. Leading the charge is one of the most frequently attacked researchers of them all—Pennsylvania State University climatologist Michael Mann.

    In this interview with host Chris Mooney, Mann pulls no punches. He defends the fundamental scientific consensus on climate change, and explains why those who attack it consistently miss the target. He also answers critics of his “hockey stick” study, and explains why the charges that have arisen in “ClimateGate” seem much more smoke than fire.

    Dr. Michael E. Mann is a member of the Pennsylvania State University faculty, and director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center. His research focuses on the application of statistical techniques to understanding climate variability and change, and he was a Lead Author on the “Observed Climate Variability and Change” chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report. Among many other distinguished scientific activities, editorships, and awards, Mann is author of more than 120 peer-reviewed and edited publications. That includes, most famously, the 1998 study that introduced the so called “hockey stick,” a graph showing that modern temperatures appear to be much higher than anything seen in at least the last thousand years. With his colleague Lee Kump, Mann also recently authored the book Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming. Finally, he is one of the founders and contributors to the prominent global warming blog, RealClimate.org.

    http://www.pointofinquiry.org/michael_mann_unprecedented_attacks_on_climate_research/

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  6. Dr. Seuss’s Copenhagen by Marcus Brigstocke

    The debacle of the Copenhagen summit told as a Dr. Seuss story on BBC’s The Now Show.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Cory Doctorow: Singularity or Dark Age?

    —Huffduffed by andybudd

  8. Stewart Brand: Rethinking Green — The Long Now

    This talk was given at Cowell Theatre in Fort Mason Center in San Francisco, California on Friday October 9, 02009.

    Brand built his case for rethinking environmental goals and methods on two major changes going on in the world. The one that most people still don’t take into consideration is that power is shifting to the developing world, where 5 out of 6 people live, where the bulk of humanity is getting out of poverty by moving to cities and creating their own jobs and communities (slums, for now).

    The second dominant global fact is climate change. Brand emphasized that climate is a severely nonlinear system packed with tipping points and positive feedbacks such as the unpredicted rapid melting of Arctic ice.

    Global warming has to be slowed by reducing the emission of greenhouse gases from combustion, but cities require dependable baseload electricity, and so far the only carbon-free sources are hydroelectric dams and nuclear power. Brand contrasted nuclear with coal-burning by comparing what happens with their waste products.

    Moving to genetically engineered food crops, Brand noted that they are a tremendous success story in agriculture, with Green benefits such as no-till farming, lowered pesticide use, and more land freed up to be wild. The developing world is taking the lead with the technology, designing crops to deal with the specialized problems of tropical agriculture. Meanwhile the new field of synthetic biology is bringing a generation of Green biotech hackers into existence.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. The Black and White Years – Power to Change

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  10. Change v2

    Obama has awoken a once in a century passion for reform. What will it take to make it work? What would "work" mean?

    Lawrence Lessig, Stanford Law School

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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