paulo72 / Paul

Web & UI Designer

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Huffduffed (168) activity chart

  1. SA001: Understanding Beauty in Architecture: Guiding Neuroaesthetics - Sensing Architecture by Maria Lorena Lehman

    Huffduffed from http://sensingarchitecture.com/podcast/sa001-understanding-beauty-architecture-guiding-neuroaesthetics/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  2. Art on the Mind

    Huffduffed from http://castroller.com/podcasts/AllInThe/1187455

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  3. The Wide World of Neuroaesthetics

    Huffduffed from http://thebeautifulbrain.com/2009/12/the-wide-world-of-neuroaesthetics/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  4. BB podcast - Omnifocus tips n tricks

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  5. 5by5 | The B&B Podcast #80: Tips and Tricks: OmniFocus

    5by5 - The B&B Podcast #80: Tips and Tricks: OmniFocus

    http://5by5.tv/bb/80

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  6. Beyond Mobile: Making Sense of a Post-PC World — dConstruct Audio Archive

    Native applications are a remnant of the Jurassic period of computer history. We will look back on these past 10 years as the time we finally grew out of our desktop mindset and started down the path of writing apps for an infinite number of platforms. As the cost of computation and connectivity plummets, manufacturers are going to put ‘interactivity’ into every device. Some of this will be trivial: my power adaptor knows it’s charging history. Some of it will be control related: my television will be grand central for my smart home. But at it’s heart, we’ll be swimming in world where every device will have ‘an app’. What will it take for us to get here, what technologies will it take to make this happen?

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2012/beyondmobile

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  7. The Amazing World of Spiders

    We all know the eensey-weensey spider went down the water spout. But for a lot of us, that’s about all we know about spiders. They’re around. They spin webs. They have a lot of legs and make some people shriek.

    A big new exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History goes way on in to the spider story, with the fishing spider and the golden orb-web spider and the goliath bird eater spider – a spider as big as your hand. It’s got the story of spider venom and spider silk – stronger than steel! – and why we need spiders.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2012/08/16/spiders

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  8. Luke Wroblewski – Designing Multi-Device User Experiences

    Context is an important consideration in designing a mobile experience. As new devices enter the market, designers have to contend with new form factors and consider things such as ergonomics. Even things such as Apple’s retina displays affect approaches to design.

    Luke Wroblewski, author of Mobile First, is at the forefront of mobile design. He says that designers need to make sure their designs are fluid and flexible. Starting with a fluid grid at a foundational level ensures that your design can adapt to a variety of viewports.

    In addition, Luke says you want to take multiple screen resolutions into account. Instead of relying on images, he suggests employing cascading style sheets and SVG. This will make sure that graphics scale appropriately to different sizes and devices.

    Luke explores this topic further with Jared Spool in this podcast. He is also is presenting one of the daylong workshops at the User Interface 17 conference in Boston, November 5-7. Learn more about the Luke’s and the other workshops at uiconf.com.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2012/08/10/luke-wroblewski-designing-multi-device-user-experiences/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  9. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  10. 5BY5 | The Web Ahead #18: CSS with Eric Meyer

    5BY5 - The Web Ahead #18: CSS with Eric Meyer

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/18

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

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