Tagged with “war” (34) activity chart

  1. 99% Invisible Episode 121: Cold War Kids

    During the 1961 Berlin Crisis—one of the various moments in the cold war in which we came frighteningly close to engaging in actual war with the Soviets—President John F. Kennedy vowed to identify spaces in “existing structures both public and private that could be used for fallout shelters in case of attack.”

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/cold-war-kids/

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  2. Errol Morris Turns His Lens On Donald Rumsfeld

    Donald Rumsfeld stood in the center of turmoil in George W. Bush’s White House, as Secretary of Defense when the Pentagon was hit on 9/11, and through the two wars that followed. Now one of America’s greatest film-makers, Errol Morris, has turned his camera on Rumsfeld – as he did years earlier on Vietnam-era Defense Secretary Robert McNamara. The result is “The Unknown Known,” a documentary that looks “from the inside out,” as Errol Morris puts it, on the mistakes and misjudgments that made the Iraq War the most polarizing in American history. This hour On Point: Errol Morris on Donald Rumsfeld.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2014/04/07/donald-rumsfeld-errol-morris-iraq

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  3. Long Now Foundation - Steven Pinker: The Decline of Violence

    First, he presents exhaustive evidence that the tragic view of history is wrong and always has been. A close examination of the data shows that in every millennium, century, and decade, humans have been drastically reducing violence, cruelty, and injustice—-right down to the present year. A trend that consistent is not luck; it has to be structural.

    So, second, he boldly founds a discipline that might as well be called “psychohistory.” As a Harvard psychologist and public intellectual (author of The Language Instinct and The Blank Slate), he sought causes for the phenomenon he’s reporting—-why violence has declined. Real ethical progress, he found, came from a sequence of institutions, norms, cultural practices, and mental tricks employed by whole societies to change their collective mind and behavior in a peaceful direction.

    Humanity’s great project of civilizing itself is far from complete, but Pinker’s survey of how far we’ve come builds confidence that the task will be completed, and he illuminates how to get there.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02012/oct/08/decline-violence/

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  4. Radiolab: Colors

    Our world is saturated in color, from soft hues to violent stains. How does something so intangible pack such a visceral punch? This hour, in the name of science and poetry, Jad and Robert tear the rainbow to pieces.

    To what extent is color a physical thing in the physical world, and to what extent is it created in our minds? We start with Sir Isaac Newton, who was so eager to solve this very mystery, he stuck a knife in his eye to pinpoint the answer. Then, we meet a sea creature that sees a rainbow way beyond anything humans can experience, and we track down a woman who we’re pretty sure can see thousands (maybe even millions) more colors than the rest of us. And we end with an age-old question, that, it turns out, never even occurred to most humans until very recently: why is the sky blue?

    http://www.radiolab.org/2012/may/21/

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  5. Matthew Klam reads Charles D’Ambrosio’s “The Point”

    Matthew Klam reads Charles D’Ambrosio’s "The Point" and discusses it with The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman. "The Point" was published in the October 1, 1990, issue of The New Yorker and was the title story of D’Ambrosio’s first collection. Matthew Klam’s most recent book of stories is "Sam the Cat."

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  6. Colum McCann reads “Transatlantic”

    This edition of the fiction podcast will take a break from the regular format and will feature Colum McCann reading his own story "Transatlantic." The regular format will resume at the beginning of May, with Matthew Klam reading Charles D’Ambrosio’s "The Point." "Transatlantic" was published in the April 16, 2012, issue of The New Yorker. McCann is the author of two collections of stories and five novels, including the National Book Award-winning "Let the Great World Spin."

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  7. George Dyson | Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe

    In the 1940s and 1950s, a group of brilliant engineers led by John von Neumann gathered in Princeton, New Jersey with the joint goal of realizing Alan Turing’s theoretical universal machine-a thought experiment that scientists use to understand the limits of mechanical computation. As a result of their fervent work, the crucial advancements that dominated 20th century technology emerged. In Turing’s Cathedral, technology historian George Dyson recreates the scenes of focused experimentation, mathematical insight, and creative genius that broke the distinction between numbers that mean things and numbers that do things-giving us computers, digital television, modern genetics, and models of stellar evolution. Also a philosopher of science, Dyson’s previous books include Baidarka, Darwin Among the Machines, and Project Orion. (recorded 3/13/2012)

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  8. Berlin 1961

    In June 1961, Nikita Khrushchev called Berlin "the most dangerous place on earth." American and Soviet fighting men and tanks stood only yards apart. Frederick Kempe talks about what made Berlin so dangerous. His book Berlin 1961 is based on a wealth of new documents and interviews, filled with fresh insights, and is a masterly look at key events of the 20th century, with powerful applications to these early years of the 21st century.

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  9. BBC World Service: Zimbabwe’s Diamond Fields

    Have you bought a diamond recently?

    Would you really know where it came from?

    Assignment goes into Zimbabwe’s Marange diamond fields and uncovers evidence of torture camps and widescale killings.

    As the international community argues over whether these diamonds should be sold on the open market, we ask if President Robert Mugabe will ever face prosecution for these crimes.

    Hilary Andersson reports.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00jb7cz

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  10. DocArchive: The Kill Factor: Part Two: 11 June 11

    Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today. They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after. And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

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