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Tagged with “conference” (56) activity chart

  1. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir one year ago

  2. SXSW 2012: The Ultimate Bruce Sterling Talk

    This is Bruce Sterling’s closing talk from SXSW 2012 Interactive.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  3. Adactio: Articles—All Our Yesterdays

    A presentation on digital preservation from the Build conference in Belfast in November 2011.

    Our communication methods have improved over time, from stone tablets, papyrus, and vellum through to the printing press and the World Wide Web. But while the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. This presentation will look at the scale of the problem and propose methods for tackling our collective data loss.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5176/

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  4. John Allsopp – The Dao of Web Design Revisited | Web Directions

    In 2000, when the web was less than half the age it is now, when the concept of web standards was still not much more than an ember carefully nurtured by a small group of practitioners who might fairly have been called fanatics (and less charitably, but just as accurately, lunatics), John Allsopp wrote “A Dao of Web Design”.

    Little did he know, and even less can he believe, that more than a decade later, an eon in internet years, it is still widely quoted by some of the web’s most well known and respected practitioners, and considered by some to be a seminal text in web design.

    So, ten years later, what does John now think about his thesis, and his suggestions for developers? In a world of highly fragmented user experiences, across all manner of screen sizes and input modes, what now seems hopelessly naïve? What if anything, stands the test of time. And what, if anything, new has John learned as he has continued to develop with web technologies over the last 10 years.

    Come and listen as John revisits a Dao of Web Design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/john-allsopp-the-dao-of-web-design-revisited/

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  5. Jeremy Keith at From The Front 2011: One Web

    The range of devices accessing the web is increasing. We are faced with a choice in how we deal with this diversity. We can either fracture the web by designing a multitude of device-specific silos, or we can embrace the flexibility of the web and create experiences that can adapt to any device or browser.

    http://www.spreaker.com/show/back_to_the_front

    http://lanyrd.com/2011/fromthefront/sgfgq/

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  6. Emotional Design for the World of Objects

    Welcome to the world of atoms. Remember when the mantra was that bits were more important than atoms? That we could dispense with physical things because information was all that mattered? Well, that was nonsense then and it is nonsense now.

    The human body is part of the physical world. It savors touch and feeling, movement and action. How else to explain the popularity of physical devices, of games that require gestures, and full-body movement?

    Want to develop for this new world? There are new rules for interacting with the world, new rules for the developers of systems. But the new rules still follow the old principles. Let’s not throw away the old lessons of interaction. In fact, these become even more important than ever before. And yes, there are some new things to learn as well, new technologies to master, new words to learn.

    Today the need is for complex, rich, emotionally satisfying things. It is no longer just about function and service. Those are still important, but they are taken for granted. Today we must add convenience and comfort, fun and excitement, pleasure. We needed to develop applications that both delivered real value but also was high in emotional value, experience, and engagement.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/don-norman

    Dr. Don Norman is the author or co-author of fourteen books, with translations into sixteen languages, including: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and The Invisible Computer. Business Week has called this the bible of the ‘post PC’ thinking. His latest book, Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things marks the transition from usability to aesthetics, but with the emphasis on a well-rounded, cohesive product that looks good, works well, and gives pride to the owner. The well-rounded product, says Don, will enhance the heart as well as the mind, being a joy to behold, to use, and to own.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  7. Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

    Addiction or devotion? The complexity of our relationships between connected experiences, devices and people is increasing. Stanley Kubrick once said a film “should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what‛s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later”.

    Design ethnographer Kelly Goto presents underlying emotional indicators that reveal surprising attachments to brands, products, services and devices. Gain insight on designing user experiences that map to people‛s real needs and desires.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kelly-goto

    As an evangelist for ‘design ethnography’, Kelly Goto is dedicated to understanding how real people integrate products and services into their daily lives. Goto is Principal of gotomedia, LLC, a global leader in research-driven, people-friendly interface design for web, mobile and product solutions for clients including Seiko Epson Japan, Adobe, NetIQ, WebEx and CNET. Her book, Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works, is a standard for user-centered design principles. Goto is also the editor of gotomobile.com, a leading online publication on mobile user experience and serves on the national board of the AIGA Center for Brand Experience.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  8. Letting Go

    Design (or if you prefer—user experience) is at a crossroads. In our globalized, hyper-connected world, users no longer need to wait for us to create experiences for them. As we debate the value of design thinking, the usefulness of the next API, or strive to craft the ultimate cross-platform experience—users are sorting this out on their own, using whatever service or technology is “good enough” for them at the time.

    Strategies and scenarios that made sense mere months ago, are disintegrating as technologies shift, business models crumble, and we watch with dismay as users exchange tips to disable JavaScript on their Kindles, or access multiplayer Flash games on the iPads.

    What happens to your brand, your product, and your bottom line when users choose “good enough”, over your carefully crafted product or service? Is it a sign of failure, a missed opportunity, or a chance to dive head first towards a new reality?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/bryan-stephanie-rieger

    Bryan Rieger is a designer, writer and reluctant developer with a background in theatre design and classical animation. Bryan has worked across various media including print, broadcast, web and mobile; and with clients such as Apple, Microsoft and Nokia.

    Stephanie Rieger is a writer, designer, and closet anthropologist with a passion for the many ways people interact with technology. With a diverse background, Stephanie’s expertise lies in marrying design, technology, and business goals to craft simple, elegant experiences.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  9. What Is the Shape of the Future Book?

    We will always debate: the quality of the paper, the pixel density of the display; the cloth used on covers, the interface for highlighting; location by page, location by paragraph.

    This is not what matters. Surface is secondary.

    What are the core systems comprising the future book? What are the tools that need to be built?

    As designers we will need to provide the scaffolding for these systems. The interfaces for these tools. Not just as surface, but holistically—understanding the shifting of emotional space, the import of the artifact, the evocation of a souvenir, digitally.

    How will we surface the myriad data just below the words of digital books in organic, clean and deliberately designed ways? How will we shape the future book?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/craig-mod

    Craig Mod is a writer, designer and publisher concerned with the future of books, publishing, and storytelling. He lives in a tiny Bay Area village in the California full of dreamers, endless yogurt, and trees that let loose money when shaken just so. His writing appears mainly on his website, but has also appeared in the New Scientist, The New York Times, and A List Apart. He works as a designer for Flipboard.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

  10. The Full Stack of Entertainment: Storytelling, Play and Code

    Forget transmedia. Forget alternate and augmented realities. Forget multimedia magazines, tablets, phones and puzzling QR codes. Our challenge lies in figuring out the full-stack of entertainment, designed from the bottom right to the very top: for phones, physical objects—part of the Internet of things or otherwise—tablets and conventional computing devices, where art, code and design mesh together perfectly with directorial vision.

    These teams producing our next generation of entertainment are right at the heart of Steve Jobs’ placing of Apple at the intersection of liberal arts and technology. Where did they come from, how are they evolving entertainment and how are they making storytelling, play, code and technology sing?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/dan-hon

    Dan Hon is a Creative Director at Wieden Kennedy in Portland, OR, where he works on the intersection between storytelling, games, play and code. A former lawyer, he’s worked for Mind Candy helping to build their first product, Perplex City, and co-founded Six to Start, an award-winning entertainment production company in 2007. He’s most known for being passionately for, and against, ARGs. He does not play World of Warcraft anymore.

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir 2 years ago

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