Tagged with “social” (9) activity chart

  1. The System Of The World

    We may regard the present state of the universe as the effect of the past and the cause of the future. An intellect which at any given moment knew all of the forces that animate nature and the mutual positions of the beings that compose it, if this intellect were vast enough to submit the data to analysis, could condense into a single formula the movement of the greatest bodies of the universe and that of the lightest atom; for such an intellect nothing could be uncertain and the future just like the past would be present before its eyes.

    — Pierre Simon de Laplace

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Designing for the Coral Reef

    Can you build a successful website that nobody ever has to visit?

    Feeds, APIs, widgets, Facebook apps, mobile and instant messaging mean that there are many ways for users to interact with a service without them having to visit the main website. When we first talked about building Dopplr, we wanted give users more choice about how they get their information into and out of the application. In this talk, we’ll describe how the site at dopplr.com is just one manifestation of a many-headed Internet service. We’ll talk about how this affects the user interface design and the data modeling, and how it strengthens the relationship between designer and developer.

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Social Network Portability

    Why is it that every single social network community site makes you re-enter all your personal profile info (name, email, birthday, URL etc.) and re-add all your friends? With new social networks being launched nearly every week, the problem of social network fatigue has gone from being a geeky early adopter problem to being much more widespread.

    This talk will discuss the problems and the goals of social network portability, as well as looking at the latest open data formats, techniques and recipes that sites are using to connect to the open social web.

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Designing for Interaction

    Creating a social site sounds great until you get around to actually designing that ambiguous ‘social’ part that’s central to its success. Enabling and encouraging your community to participate is a complex challenge that only gets more sophisticated as the populace on your site grows. In many critical areas, you’ll come up against the curious juxtapositions of designing social interactions. Encouraging positive activities while discouraging negative behaviors, satisfying power users while catering to lurkers, ensuring privacy while fostering openness, and creating pathways while remaining open to unexpected developments, are just some of the hurdles you’re likely to face as you design your site.

    Using case studies from Digg, Pownce, and other social communities, we’ll examine how to balance these and other concerns from a user interface design perspective. In particular, mistakes will be analyzed and success stories will be dissected to help explain how successful social interactions can be created and pitfalls can be avoided.

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. Leveraging Cognitive Bias in Social Design

    Humans are not perfectly rational. We’re full of biases that colour the way we think and act. Smart designers can use these biases in their favour, to attract and convince people that their software is worth using. In this talk Josh will share some insights into how to use cognitive bias to get people signing up for and using your software.

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    Joshua Porter is the founder of Bokardo Design, an interface design and strategy shop focusing exclusively on social web applications. He recently wrote the book Designing for the Social Web.

    When he is not designing websites, Josh is speaking about it at conferences or writing about it at bokardo.com. He lets off steam by rock climbing and keeping up with his two year old.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. The Urban Web

    Drawing on the story of disease and urban terror from his 2006 bestseller, The Ghost Map, Johnson will launch dConstruct with a keynote address on the information networks that form on the sidewalks and public spaces of urban life. He’ll examine the many ways that those social systems are migrating to the emerging platform of the geoweb. The rise of location-aware devices and increasingly mainstream geotagging presents an unique opportunity to unite the real and virtual worlds, and bring new life to the troubled newspaper industry. But that opportunity is going to require innovative new tools for navigating the geoweb, which the keynote will explore in some detail — including a first look at some new projects under development at outside.in.

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  7. The Experience Stack

    Here are two ways of looking at a television: a TV is a display surface in my home which can show video which is broadcast or kept on storage media. And then: television is a friend who starts conversations between me and other people.

    Products aren’t only their aesthetic form and feature lists in catalogues. We live alongside them, and they open us to experiences. We first spy them across a crowded shop floor (then take them home and unwrap them); we get to know them, are frustrated by them, are pleased by them; we socialise with them and our other friends.

    The experience of a product is what we feel and what guides us through our lives together. Every time we cross paths, there’s a hook for experience. The sequence of these communicates the brand, and can be variously playful, engaging, educational or however we choose to colour it.

    Being aware of how this happens helps us design that experience. Through his favourite on-screen apps and physical, plastic gadgets, Matt looks at the whole experience stack – from the moment-by-moment feedback in user interface to large, complex ideas in critical design – and discusses how we can apply these ideas to our own projects.

    http://2007.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. Human Traffic

    Denise and George want to talk to you about a few community-based projects they’ve worked on. They’ll delve into strategies and ideas around building a sense of place, and discuss the dynamics they have observed by watching people get comfortable… so comfortable there’s a sense of ownership and possession.

    http://2007.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  9. The Transformers

    When you think of a city, what is the first thing that comes to mind? Most likely it is the stuff that it is made up of: its streets and buildings, its parks and squares. But what sets a city apart, aside from its architecture, is how all that stuff is put to use. A city’s nightlife, a city’s cuisine, a city’s culture. In other words, what people make of the space they live in when they are at play.

    Play isn’t limited to the ‘soft side’ of urbanism. In fact, it turns out a building isn’t some prefixed structure capable of doing one thing only. Adaptation and reuse continuously transform what a city’s architecture is for, often from the bottom up. In this way, a city’s people shape their homes as well, quite literally.

    What is at work in this process of city transformation, is nothing less than play. In cities, just as in games, people and the space they inhabit shape each other. Thus, in our Western cities, where reuse is overtaking construction of new space, we are all becoming architects.

    In this session Kars looks at how game culture and play shape the urban fabric, how we might design systems that improve people’s capacity to do so, and how you yourself, through play, can transform the city you call home.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kars-alfrink

    Kars Alfrink is ‘Chief Agent’ of Hubbub, a networked design studio for applied pervasive games. Hubbub works with organizations to create games that take place in public space, engage people physically, and are socially relevant. Amongst other things, these games are used to encourage good citizenship and to facilitate cultural participation.

    Besides this, Kars teaches at the Utrecht School of the Arts, where he mentors students who are pursuing a Master of Arts in Interaction Design or Game Design & Development. He is also the initiator and co organizer of ‘This Happened’ — Utrecht,a series of lectures dedicated to the stories behind interaction design.

    In his spare time, Kars practices a traditional Japanese martial art, and tries to keep up with geek culture.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct