minorjive / collective / tags / government

Tagged with “government” (8) activity chart

  1. Mariana Mazzucato - The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Private vs. Public Sector Myths

    Where do the boldest innovations, with the deepest consequences for society, come from?

    Many business leaders, entrepreneurs, and libertarians claim that the private sector leads the way always, and government at best follows by decades and at worst impedes the process with bureaucratic regulations.

    Mariana Mazzucato proves otherwise. Many of the most profound innovations—from the Internet and GPS to nanotech and biotech —had their origin in government programs developed specifically to explore innovations that might eventually attract private sector interest. Ignoring this entrepreneurial risk taking role of government has fuelled a very different story about governments role in the economy, and also fuelled the dysfunctional dynamic whereby risk is socialised—with tax payers absorbing the greatest risk—- but rewards are not. Mazzucato will argue that socialization of risk, privatization of rewards is not only bad for the future of innovation eco-systems but also a key driver of inequality. What to do about it?

    Mazzucato is a professor of the Economics of Innovation at Sussex University and author of The Entrepreneurial State: debunking private vs. public sector myths.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02014/mar/24/entrepreneurial-state-debunking-private-vs-public-sector-myths/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 weeks ago

  2. Assange: Governments ‘aspire to god-like knowledge’

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks on the subject of knowledge, and its relationship with power.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/today

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  3. How the Internet will (one day) transform government - Clay Shirky - TED Global 2012

    The open-source world has learned to deal with a flood of new, oftentimes divergent, ideas using hosting services like GitHub — so why can’t governments? In this rousing talk Clay Shirky shows how democracies can take a lesson from the Internet, to be not just transparent but also to draw on the knowledge of all their citizens.

    Clay Shirky argues that the history of the modern world could be rendered as the history of ways of arguing, where changes in media change what sort of arguments are possible — with deep social and political implications.

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  4. Kevin Kelly | Trends and Social Consequences of Technology

    Kevin Kelly discusses 6 trends he believes will make the web look as different in 20 years as the web does from TV today. These aren’t super new ideas though, they are things that are pretty clearly here today already, but Kelly articulates them very well in this talk. I generally dislike attempts to definitively explain the future but I recommend listening to this talk for the effective articulation of principles like access-based business models, augmented reality and Natural User Interfaces.


    Our long-term interaction with the web will be defined by six trends. These trends will will involve dramatic changes that will make computing more like what we are used to seeing in many of today’s movies. Kevin Kelly explains why he believes that soon the internet will beneficially surround us in ways that most users don’t imagine today.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4930.html#

    —Huffduffed by marshallkirkpatrick 2 years ago

  5. Clay Shirky at O’Reilly Media Gov 2.0 Summit

    In 2009, Apps For Democracy invited people to freely create applications using raw data generated by the federal government. Within 30 days there were over 40 working applications produced, and Apps For Democracy continues to be a success. However the 2005 L.A. Times wikitorial regarding the War in Iraq ended up at the opposite extreme in less than 48 hours, as debates turned into "flame wars" and indecent disrespect.

    Clay Shirky discusses the difference between these efforts to engage the public, and briefly unpacks three important points to keep in mind when attempting to harness collaborative participation: The nature of the "Contract with the Users"; the need to accomodate the unpredictability of the users; and the danger of "Heisenberg’s press release".

    Shirky also weaves in an experiment by Uri Gneezy and Aldo Rustichini published in The Journal of Legal Studies on how the absence of clarity or firmness of clarity affects users behavior.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4411.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  6. Tom Morris: When is a dataset not a dataset?

    The hackday project that crowdsourced data.gov.uk

    How many of the now 3241 datasets listed as part of data.gov.uk are easy to open up and play with? How many are tables for computers to analyse, instead of PDF reports for people to read?

    The Hacks and Hackers Hackday filled a Channel 4 office with journalists and developers on the final Friday in January. Our aim was to tell new stories with open data. Attendees already had form - the BBC’s Open Secrets blogger Martin Rosenbaum, and data journalism teams from the Times, the Guardian, and the FT. Tom Loosemore judged our attempts in his role as head of hosts 4iP, alongside My Society boss Tom Steinberg. They awarded the prize to my team’s analysis of Tory candidates. But another project promised to shed light on public data in the UK.

    Tom Morris was part of a team that looked into the quality of data.gov.uk. Although data.gov.uk advertises itself as a database of open datasets, many of the entries are actually PDF files. He built a prototype format checker that invites people to go through datasets and record the file format.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcbackstage/2010/04/datagovuk-format-checker.shtml

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  7. A Man, a Plan — Broadband

    After many months of fact-finding and opinion gathering, the FCC at last released its long-awaited National Broadband Plan. But will it bring better internet speeds at lower prices? Consumer advocates and the FCC’s broadband chief weigh in.

    http://www.onthemedia.org/transcripts/2010/03/19/01

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 years ago

  8. Lawrence Lessig: Change Congress

    Lawrence Lessig speaks at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

    http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2008/04/07/lawrence-lessig-change-congress-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 years ago