michele / tags / culture

Tagged with “culture” (13) activity chart

  1. On Point: Claude Levi-Strauss

    At the imperial dawn of the 20th century, there was the “civilized” world and the “savage” or “primitive” world, and one felt free to judge the other.

    By the century’s end, the whole idea of primitive man as separate from civilized man was pretty well gone. And with it, the “savage mind.”

    Much of the banishing was the work of the towering anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss. Levi-Strauss has died at 100 in his native France. We are all, he said, driven by deep myth and common structures of thinking — even to our own extinction.

    This hour, On Point: The mind and work of Claude Levi-Strauss.

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2009/11/claude-levi-strauss

    —Huffduffed by michele

  2. “Mad Men” Creator Matthew Weiner

    For the second year running, top honors at the Emmys for best dramatic series went to an AMC cable show set in a New York ad agency in the early 1960s.

    The visuals of AMC’s “Mad Men” are all skinny ties and bullet bras — buttoned-down corporate America smoking and drinking and dancing on the edge of what we know would be assassinations and war and 1960s cultural revolution to come.

    Its world is white, sexist, racist, homophobic, shadowed by fear of nuclear war — and compelling, right now, in 2009.

    This hour, On Point: A conversation with Matthew Weiner, creator of “Mad Men.”

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2009/09/mad-men-creator-matthew-weiner

    —Huffduffed by michele

  3. Clay Shirky | Spark | CBC Radio

    Have you ever played around with a gadget or application, only to discover it’s absolutely perfect for something different from its original design? This kind of inventiveness, or playfulness, happens all the time in our digital environment, but it signals a major shift in the relationship between the inventor or designer and the user.

    Nora interviewed Clay Shirky about just that earlier this week. Clay is a big thinker on internet and culture, and he has a lot to say about how users shape the tools they use and how designers should respond to this new “interaction loop.”

    —Huffduffed by michele

  4. Happiness around the World: the paradox of happy peasants and miserable millionaires

    The determinants of happiness are remarkably similar around the world, in countries as different as Afghanistan, the U.S, and Chile. Income matters to happiness but only so much; friends, freedom, and employment are good for happiness, while crime, poor health, and divorce are bad. Paradoxically, however, people in places like Afghanistan can be as happy as those in much wealthier and safer ones like Chile. One explanation is the remarkable human capacity to adapt to adversity and hardship. While adaptation may be a good thing for individual wellbeing, it can also result in collective tolerance for bad equilibrium which are difficult for societies to escape from.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  5. Jennifer Michael Hecht - The Happiness Myth

    May 25 2007 - Jennifer talks with D.J. Grothe about the history of the idea of happiness.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  6. Real-Life Physics Problems Star On TV

    The stars of The Big Bang Theory are two fictional Caltech physicists, but the physics problems they study are real. Bill Prady, the program’s co-creator and executive producer, talks about including real-world science in the script, from dark matter to magnetic monopoles. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120613274

    —Huffduffed by michele

  7. Copyright and Science: A plea for skeptics

    By Lawrence Lessig.

    Talk given at Tokyo University October 5, 2009. This is a plea for scientists to be skeptical about presumptions about how IP should regulate it, and a bit about the work (the GREAT work) of Science Commons in this space.

    http://blip.tv/file/2693000

    —Huffduffed by michele

  8. On Point: How Cooking Made Us Human

    We were apes before we were humans. But humans were the onetime apes who ultimately mastered fire and cooked.

    Primatologist and anthropologist Richard Wrangham says that in evolutionary terms, that made all the difference. And not just because it put flambé on the menu.

    Fire meant proto-humans could cook. Cooking, he says, meant they could get dense, empowering nourishment. Then came bigger brains, a different body and — voila! — homo sapiens. Complete, he says, with a social structure built around that fire.

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2009/09/how-cooking-made-us-human

    —Huffduffed by michele

  9. Dmitry Orlov, “Social Collapse Best Practices”

    via http://huffduffer.com/Clampants/2974

    With vintage Russian black humor, Orlov described the social collapse he witnessed in Russia in the 1990s and spelled out its practical lessons for the American social collapse he sees as inevitable. The American economy in the 1990s described itself as “Goldilocks”—just the right size—when in fact is was “Tinkerbelle,” and one day the clapping stops. As in Russia, the US made itself vulnerable to the decline of crude oil, a trade deficit, military over-reach, and financial over-reach.

    Russians were able to muddle through the collapse by finding ways to manage 1) food, 2) shelter, 3) transportation, and 4) security.

    By way of readiness, Orlov urges all to prepare for life without a job, with near-zero burn rate. It takes practice to learn how to be poor well. Those who are already poor have an advantage.

    http://blog.longnow.org/2009/02/16/dmitry-orlov-social-collapse-best-practices/

    Transcript: http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2009/02/social-collapse-best-practices.html

    —Huffduffed by michele

  10. Building A Brand That Matters | Tony Hsieh, Zappos.com | Web 2.0 Conference

    In this presentation at the Web 2.0 Conference, Zappos.com CEO Tony Hsieh talks about his first business selling pizza in college, starting Link Exchange after college, and how he eventually ended up leading Zappos as the CEO. Tony discusses how his experience at Link Exchange influenced him to focus on corporate culture as a top priority, and why he thinks culture is so important to a company’s future growth and success.

    Tony talks about the internal vision of Zappos not just to be an Internet footware merchant, but to be a brand that is known for an excellent customer experience. He goes on to list a number of specific techniques that the company uses to enhance customer service, and explains why he thinks that the telephone is still one of the best branding devices available.

    How do you define culture? Tony talks about some of the core values of Zappos, and why it’s important to have values that aren’t just a plaque on a wall. These values permeate every aspect of the company, and Tony details some of the hiring and training practices that Zappos uses to ensure that every employee fits into the corporate culture.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail3976.html

    —Huffduffed by michele

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