michele / collective / tags / hardware

Tagged with “hardware” (15) activity chart

  1. Carla Diana

    Life now. Data later. In this week’s podcast guest Carla Diana, a product designer, discusses this mantra and other attributes designers should consider when developing connected products.

    http://gigaom.com/2013/05/23/podcast-how-to-design-a-connected-device-that-isnt-a-jerk-plus-iots-recipe-for-success/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Podcast: the Internet of Things should work like the Internet

    A chat about the future of UI/UX design with Alasdair Allan, Josh Marinacci and Tony Santos.

    http://radar.oreilly.com/2013/11/podcast-the-internet-of-things-should-work-like-the-internet.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Looking Sideways – Episode 3 – Brendan Dawes

    For Episode 3, I interviewed the designer and maker Brendan Dawes. Brendan’s known for early interactive web projects like Psycho Studio, that allows users to remix Hitchcock’s famous shower scene themselves. He’s also known for his physical projects, such as the Moviepeg and Popa phone accessories, and devices that cross the digital/physical divide, such as the Happiness machine, an internet-connected printer that prints random happy thoughts from people across the web.

    We talk about making digital stuff tangible, design, art and simplicity, remixes and supercuts, and how makers can get their work out into the world for people to see.

    http://andrewsleigh.com/1322

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Chris Anderson: The Makers Revolution - The Long Now

    We’re now entering the third industrial revolution, Anderson said. The first one, which began with the spinning jenny in 1776, doubled the human life span and set population soaring. From the demographic perspective, "it’s as if nothing happened before the Industrial Revolution."

    The next revolution was digital. Formerly industrial processes like printing were democratized with desktop publishing. The "cognitive surplus" of formerly passive consumers was released into an endless variety of personal creativity. Then distribution was democratized by the Web, which is "scale agnostic and credentials agnostic." Anyone can potentially reach 7 billion people.

    The third revolution is digital manufacturing, which combines the gains of the first two revolutions. Factory robots, which anyone can hire, have become general purpose and extremely fast. They allow "lights-out manufacturing," that goes all night and all weekend.

    "This will reverse the arrow of globalization," Anderson said. "The centuries of quest for cheaper labor is over. Labor arbitrage no longer drives trade." The advantages of speed and flexibility give the advantage to "locavore" manufacturing because "Closer is faster." Innovation is released from the dead weight of large-batch commitments. Designers now can sit next to the robots building their designs and make adjustments in real time.

    Thus the Makers Movement. Since 2006, Maker Faires, Hackerspaces, and TechShops (equipped with laser cutters, 3D printers, and CAD design software) have proliferated in the US and around the world. Anderson said he got chills when, with the free CAD program Autodesk 123D, he finished designing an object and moused up to click the button that used to say "Print." This one said "Make." A 3D printer commenced building his design.

    Playing with Minecraft, "kids are becoming fluent in polygons." With programs like 123D Catch you can take a series of photos with your iPhone of any object, and the software will create a computer model of it. "There is no copyright on physical stuff," Anderson pointed out. The slogan that liberated music was "Rip. Mix. Burn." The new slogan is "Rip. Mod. Make."

    I asked Anderson, "But isn’t this Makers thing kind of trivial, just trailing-edge innovation?" "That’s why it’s so powerful," Anderson said. "Remember how trivial the first personal computers seemed?"

    — by Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02013/feb/19/makers-revolution/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Beyond Mobile: Making Sense of a Post-PC World

    Native applications are a remnant of the Jurassic period of computer history. We will look back on these past 10 years as the time we finally grew out of our desktop mindset and started down the path of writing apps for an infinite number of platforms. As the cost of computation and connectivity plummets, manufacturers are going to put ‘interactivity’ into every device. Some of this will be trivial: my power adaptor knows it’s charging history. Some of it will be control related: my television will be grand central for my smart home. But at it’s heart, we’ll be swimming in world where every device will have ‘an app’. What will it take for us to get here, what technologies will it take to make this happen?

    This talk will discuss how the principles of the open web must apply not only to prototocols but to hardware as well. How can we build a ‘DNS for hardware’ so the menagerie of devices has a chance for working together?

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/jenson/

    Scott Jenson used to work at Apple, developing the Human Interface guidelines and working on the Newton, no less. He also worked at Symbian and Google so he knows all about mobile devices of all kinds.

    Scott is currently Creative Director at Frog Design where he has been writing about the coming zombie apocalypse.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Open Source Rockets

    Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We’re building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.

    With the new proposed NASA budget eliminating the US manned spaceflight program and a heap of small private space companies popping up, the way we think about getting to space is changing. Is there room for open source in this brave new (space) world? PSAS has been working on open source avionics and hardware for small rockets for several years. We present our experience with, and thoughts on the future of, open source rocketry.

    http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/407

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Design Critique: Products for People

    Encouraging useful and usable designs for a better customer experience. /

    http://designcritique.net/dc79-interview-author-giles-colborne-of-simple-and-usable-web-mobile-and-interaction-design

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  8. Andrew Fisher — How the web is going physical

    In 2020 there will be nearly 10 times as many Internet connected devices as there are human beings on this planet. The majority of these will not have web browsers. When it comes to the “Internet of Things”, web designers and developers are uniquely placed to create, connect and produce innovative new ways for these devices to be used.

    We are used to mashing up disconnected data sets, playing with APIs and designing for constantly moving standards in order to create compelling digital user experiences. “Old school” engineers are struggling to keep pace due to long processes for product and service design but as web creators we understand the value of rapid prototyping, user feedback and quick iterations. As developers, we play daily with a bewildering array of technologies that span networks, servers and user interfaces. As designers, we understand the nature of beautiful but usable technology.

    These skills, and our innate understanding of how interconnectedness enhances and creates engaging user experiences, mean that web creators will be critical for the next generation of Internet enabled Things in our world. From a potplant that tweets when it needs water to crowd sourcing pollution data with sensors on people’s windows and visualising it on Google Maps these are the new boundaries of the web creator’s skills. Have you ever dreamt of sending your phone to the edge of space to take a picture of a country? Or how about a robot you can control via a web browser?

    By exploring examples of things in the wild right now and delving into practical guidance for for getting started, this session will demonstrate how easy it is for web designers and developers to build Internet connected and aware Things.

    About Andrew Fisher

    Andrew Fisher is deeply passionate about technology and is constantly tinkering with and breaking something — whether it’s a new application for mobile computing, building a robot, deploying a cloud or just playing around with web tech. Sometimes he does some real work too and has been involved in developing digital solutions for businesses since the dawn of the web in Australia and Europe for brands like Nintendo, peoplesound, Sony, Mitsubishi, Sportsgirl and the Melbourne Cup.

    Andrew is the CTO for JBA Digital, a data agency in Melbourne Australia, where he focuses on creating meaning out of large, changing data sets for clients. Andrew is also the founder of Rocket Melbourne, a startup technology lab exploring physical computing and the Web of Things.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/andrew-fisher-how-the-web-is-going-physical/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. BBC Outriders — Histories, stories and current tales

    Jamillah Knowles’s Outriders podcast featuring Andrew Back reporting from a meeting of the Open Source Hardware User Group http://oshug.org hosted by BBC Learning Development.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/outriders/2011/02/histories_stories_and_current.shtml

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  10. BBC Outriders — Histories, stories and current tales

    Jamillah Knowles’s Outriders podcast featuring Andrew Back reporting from a meeting of the Open Source Hardware User Group http://oshug.org hosted by BBC Learning Development.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/outriders/2011/02/histories_stories_and_current.shtml

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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