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Tagged with “book:author=william gibson” (20) activity chart

  1. Pattern Recognition by William Gibson, Part 3

    ‘Coolhunter’ Cayce Pollard is mugged in Tokyo - but who’s behind her assailants? Fast-moving thriller read by Lorelei King.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Pattern Recognition by William Gibson, Part 2

    ‘Coolhunter’ Cayce travels to Tokyo in search of the online footage’s creator. Lorelei King reads the fast-moving thriller.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Pattern Recognition by William Gibson, Part 1

    ‘Coolhunter’ Cayce Pollard takes on an apparently routine assignment in London. Fast-moving thriller read by Lorelei King.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Spark 127

    On this episode of Spark: William Gibson, Lumberjack Chic, and The Last IP Address.

    Way back in the early days of the internet, engineers had to come up with a number for how many IP addresses we would need. It was more or less a case of one IP address for every computer, so they picked a number they thought was big enough. Well, that number is about to run out. With so many digital devices these days, any one person could need 3 or 4 or more IP addresses. So they’re disappearing. Fast. So what does that mean for us? Spark producer Dan Misener goes deep into the bowels of the internet to find out.

    From http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2010/11/spark-127-–november-14-17-2010/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. William Gibson, author of Zero History: Interview on The Sound of Young America

    William Gibson is a science fiction writer whose works increasingly take place in a realistic present. His latest book, Zero History, is about fashion, authenticity and identity. It’s a freestanding third work in an informal trilogy, which also includes Pattern Recognition and Spook Country.

    http://www.maximumfun.org/sound-young-america/william-gibson-author-zero-history-interview-sound-young-america

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. William Gibson on Zero History

    ‘I don’t get the feeling that nothing is happening,’ replied the father of Cyberpunk. ‘I just get the feeling that more and more of it is happening on a different field.’

    This Intelligence Squared event at Cadogan Hall in London saw the coming-together of two great believers in the vibrancy and power of the present: William Gibson and Cory Doctorow. Despite the discussion covering topics unrestrained by time - reaching back to the age of the Victorians and stretching, via 1940 and our ‘increasingly interesting’ present, to 2060 - or location (we were taken from the Far East to western Canada, with stop-overs in Shoreditch and Brooklyn), Gibson repeatedly underlined the centrality of the present in his work. He stressed that good science fiction writing is based on looking at ‘all the things around you’ and finding ‘the ones with the most obvious legs to carry you into the future.’

    What sort of a future that will be, however, remains a mystery to Gibson. There are simply ‘too many wild cards in play,’ he said, for us to casually erect accurate futures. One thing that seemed certain was the sustained threat to any genuine subculture. We are now left, he lamented, with only ‘splinters of Bohemia,’ the violation of which seems almost complete in a world where ‘the way D. H. Lawrence looked is … much more important than what D.H. Lawrence wrote.’

    From http://iq2.podbean.com/2010/10/04/william-gibson-on-zero-history/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Interview with William Gibson

    "I might be one of the first generation of science fiction writers to come to the writing of it with a head full of academic critical theories…"

    —William Gibson

    From http://www.bookotron.com/agony/news/2010/09-13-10-podcast.htm#podcast091310

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Cyber Prophet William Gibson

    For all of the Internet era, and even before, novelist William Gibson has been the ultimate science fiction guru of the age. He invented the notion – the word – “cyberspace” before the Web even existed. He took us to dystopic futures that became nows in “Neuromancer,” “Burning Chrome,” and “Virtual Light.”

    Now, when whole lives – or big pieces – have migrated to the Web and beyond, Gibson is beyond as well. He’s watching the culture from new angles. We speak with Gibson about his latest novel, “Zero History,” and where our world – and his – stand now.

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/09/william-gibson

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Boing Boing Boing 15: William Gibson

    Cory Doctorow and the Boing Boing Boing team talk to William Gibson about Spook Country.

    From http://odeo.com/episodes/16091713-Boing-Boing-Boing-015-William-Gibson

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. William Gibson on The Bat Segundo Show

    “Warmy blanky” is just one of the magical phrases that the cyberpunk author is obsessed with in this discussion concerning Spook Country.

    Subjects Discussed: Coats, blankets, and carapaces in Gibson’s fiction, textures, characters with shaved heads, on not having technological issues, the Apple Store, cell phones and the natural street state, obsolete technology and thrift shops, ZX81s, VR, sitting atop the technological anthill, the internal combustion engine, how to escape being handcuffed with a piece of a ball point pen, the origin of Blue Ant, color taxonomies, Belgians, locative art, rock ‘n roll novels from the 1960s, the downsides of sitting in a SFWA suite, Bobby Chombo, cigarettes, Cory Doctorow, GPS plausibilities, celebrity deaths, Philip K. Dick, Milgram and Dr. Stanley Milgrim, Norman Cohn’s The Pursuit of the Millennium, ghostly connections between Pattern Recognition and Spook Country, tripartite plot structures, writing while not knowing what was in the suitcase, extra-terrestrial artifacts in Baghdad, how to confuse John Clute, the historical record being determined by Wikipedia and Google results, Google Maps and street view, lonelygirl15, YouTube, Japanese behavioral protocols, responding to Ed Park’s theory about the old man and Win being the same character, unreliable narrators, and Iain Sinclair.

    From http://www.edrants.com/segundo/bss-133-william-gibson/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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