markhulme / tags / fiction

Tagged with “fiction” (10) activity chart

  1. Bruce Sterling: The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole - The Long Now

    One reason lots of people don’t want to think long term these days is because technology keeps accelerating so rapidly, we assume the world will become unrecognizable in a few years and then move on to unimaginable. Long-term thinking must be either impossible or irrelevant.

    The commonest shorthand term for the runaway acceleration of technology is “the Singularity”—a concept introduced by science fiction writer Vernor Vinge in 1984. The term has been enthusiastically embraced by technology historians, futurists, extropians, and various trans-humanists and post-humanists, who have generated variants such as “the techno-rapture,” “the Spike,” etc.

    It takes a science fiction writer to critique a science fiction idea.

    Along with being one of America’s leading science fiction writers and technology journalists, Bruce Sterling is a celebrated speaker armed with lethal wit. His books include The Zenith Angle (just out), Hacker Crackdown, Holy Fire, Distraction, Mirrorshades (cyberpunk compendium), Schismatrix, The Difference Engine (with William Gibson), Tomorrow Now, and Islands in the Net.

    The Seminar About Long-term Thinking on June 10-11 was Bruce Sterling examining “The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole.” He treated the subject of hyper-acceleration of technology as a genuine threat worth alleviating and as a fond fantasy worth cruel dismemberment.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02004/jun/11/the-singularity-your-future-as-a-black-hole/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme one year ago

  2. Charlie Stross on Singularity 1 on 1: The World is Complicated. Elegant Narratives Explaining Everything Are Wrong!

    Want to find out why Charlie Stross thinks that the singularity, if it happens at all, may not leave any room for humans? Check out his interview for www.SingularityWeblog.com

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/charlie-stross-on-singularity-1-on-1-the-world-is-complicated-elegant-narratives-explaining-everything-are-wrong/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 2 years ago

  3. Union Dues - Iron Bars and the Glass Jaw

    “You super folks must think we’re pretty damn foolish, especially us in the law enforcement community.”

    Look at him leaning back with his feet up on the desk. Did he just walk out of Cool Hand Luke? Sheesh, you’d think a sheriff would want to be more dignified. “No sir. You and your brethren are integral to the fabric of society. We of The Union are grateful for your hard work and courage.” I can rattle that sort of crap off all day long.

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 2 years ago

  4. Union Dues - Off White Lies

    Leave,” she said calmly, “just go. A recruiting visit was here just three weeks ago and they had no success. The people here don’t much like the Union. Hell, it took me almost a year before any of them would even speak to me, and I didn’t try to razzle-dazzle them.” She quickly scanned the list and produced folders matching each name. “Here,” she said and slid them across the desk, “but they won’t go with you.”

    The Union tries very hard to get all Supers to sign on and become active members, but some simply won’t. This is the first Village, and already The Union is constructing others. Either the mutation rate is rising among the Normals, or we’re getting better at ferreting them out. Either way, we need more space.

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 2 years ago

  5. Shannon’s Law

    When the Way to Bordertown closed, I was only four years old, and I was more interested in peeling the skin off my Tickle Me Elmo to expose the robot lurking inside his furry pelt than I was in networking or even plumbing the unknowable mysteries of Elfland. But a lot can change in thirteen years.

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    —Huffduffed by markhulme 2 years ago

  6. Cities: Real and Unreal a discussion of Architecture and Fiction with Jeff Vandermeer, Jeffrey Ford, Geoff Manaugh

    This is a special edition of If You’re Just Joining Us. I had the pleasure of attending a reading and discussion at a Borders in New York a few weeks ago and recorded the event. This is the discussion part of the program, which was hosted by Ron Hogan. The three members of the discussion panel were: Jeff Vandermeer, Jeffrey Ford, and Geoff Manaugh.

    Jeff Vandermeer, who was recently on IFYJJU, had graciously invited me. His website is http://www.jeffvandermeer.com/.

    Jeffrey Ford’s is http://users.rcn.com/delicate/ Geoff Manaugh’s is BLDG BLOG

    The host was Ron Hogan and his site is Beatrice.

    http://www.ifyourejustjoiningus.com/2009/12/11/cities-real-and-unreal-a-discussion-of-architecture-and-fiction-with-jeff-vandermeer-jeffrey-ford-geoff-manaugh/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 2 years ago

  7. Arthur C. Clarke, Alvin Toffler, and Margaret Mead on Man’s Future

    What does the future look like from the past? This exciting program with three people that could not better represent the intelligentsia of futurism circa 1970. This recording is from a radio program called “Sound on Film”, a series on films and the people who make them. This episode is entitled “2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?” Recorded May 7th, 1970. Joseph Gelman is the moderator.

    At the time of this recording Arthur C. Clarke had recently collaborated on the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey with Stanley Kubrick. Alvin Toffler’s mega-influential book, Future Shock, is about to be published. And Margaret Mead is the world’s foremost cultural anthropologist.

    An intriguing conversation that still has relevance today.

    2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?

    Length–54:18

    http://www.sfoha.org/arthur-c-clarke-alvin-toffler-and-margaret-mead-on-mans-future/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 3 years ago

  8. Sci-Fi’s Cory Doctorow Separates Self-Publishing Fact From Fiction

    Cory Doctorow is a best-selling science-fiction writer, champion of creative commons and, now, self-publishing pioneer. He’s distributing his latest book, a collection of short stories called With a Little Help, without the aid of a publishing house. Instead, he has turned to his online community, and social networks like Facebook and Twitter, to help build buzz, get advice and even copy edit his new book.

    Doctorow tells NPR’s Michele Norris the key to making money off a business model that’s built around the word "free."

    Huffduffed from http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2010/10/25/130811846/doctorow

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 3 years ago

  9. SFFaudio with Jeremy Keith

    The SFFaudio Podcast #083 – Jesse talks with Jeremy Keith of Huffduffer.com about his website. Huffduffer can turn any MP3 file on the web into a podcast! Huffduffer lets you make your own curated podcasts and share them with the world.

    From http://www.sffaudio.com/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 3 years ago

  10. To The Best of Our Knowledge: Superheroes

    Batman, Superman, the Green Lantern… we all had our superheroes as kids. Maybe we still do today? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, SUPERHEROES. We’ll celebrate Wonder Woman’s 70th birthday with a look at her controversial new costume. We’ll also explore the actual physics of superpowers. And, "The 99" – an Islamic comic book in which each superhero reflects one of the 99 names of Allah.

    SEGMENT 1: James Kakalios teaches physics at the University of Minnesota and is the author of "The Physics of Superheroes." He tells Jim Fleming that Superman’s powers make sense for a creature born on a planet with stronger gravity than Earth’s, and that often fantasy writers strive to be scientific if you grant them one impossible feat.

    SEGMENT 2: Wonder Woman is 70! Jim Lee drew the updated Wonder Woman and describes her to Steve Paulson, explaining the reasoning behind the updates. Jim Lee is co-publisher of DC comics. Also, Aimee Mullins is an athlete, fashion model and activist who uses whichever of her 12 pairs of prosthetic legs is appropriate for the task at hand. She talks with Anne Strainchamps about why her running legs are modeled on a cheetah’s and why she sees herself as having superpowers, rather than being "disabled."

    SEGMENT 3: Naif Al-Mutawa lives in his native Kuwait and is the Creator of "The 99," a comic book series featuring a group of superheroes each of whom derives a power from one of the 99 attributes of Allah. Al-Mutawa tells Steve Paulson that his Islamic superheroes are a response to President Obama’s Cairo speech, and that they may soon engage with the traditional Western superheroes.

    http://www.wpr.org/book/100905a.cfm

    —Huffduffed by markhulme 3 years ago