markhulme / tags / fiction

Tagged with “fiction” (14) activity chart

  1. Bruce Sterling: The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole - The Long Now

    One reason lots of people don’t want to think long term these days is because technology keeps accelerating so rapidly, we assume the world will become unrecognizable in a few years and then move on to unimaginable. Long-term thinking must be either impossible or irrelevant.

    The commonest shorthand term for the runaway acceleration of technology is “the Singularity”—a concept introduced by science fiction writer Vernor Vinge in 1984. The term has been enthusiastically embraced by technology historians, futurists, extropians, and various trans-humanists and post-humanists, who have generated variants such as “the techno-rapture,” “the Spike,” etc.

    It takes a science fiction writer to critique a science fiction idea.

    Along with being one of America’s leading science fiction writers and technology journalists, Bruce Sterling is a celebrated speaker armed with lethal wit. His books include The Zenith Angle (just out), Hacker Crackdown, Holy Fire, Distraction, Mirrorshades (cyberpunk compendium), Schismatrix, The Difference Engine (with William Gibson), Tomorrow Now, and Islands in the Net.

    The Seminar About Long-term Thinking on June 10-11 was Bruce Sterling examining “The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole.” He treated the subject of hyper-acceleration of technology as a genuine threat worth alleviating and as a fond fantasy worth cruel dismemberment.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02004/jun/11/the-singularity-your-future-as-a-black-hole/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  2. A 2011 Interview With Jonathan Lethem

    An interview about ‘The Ecstasy of Influence: Nonfictions, Etc.’ with Jonathan Lethem is, for this book reviewer, something between therapy and a session with one of those gurus you see in cartoons sitting on a mountaintop, dispensing the wisdom of the ancients.

    http://bookotron.com/agony/news/2011/12-26-11-podcast.htm#podcast122611

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  3. Cities Real and Unreal

    A discussion of architecture and fiction with Jeff Vandermeer, Jeffrey Ford, Geoff Manaugh

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  4. Charlie Stross on Singularity 1 on 1: The World is Complicated. Elegant Narratives Explaining Everything Are Wrong!

    Want to find out why Charlie Stross thinks that the singularity, if it happens at all, may not leave any room for humans? Check out his interview for www.SingularityWeblog.com

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/charlie-stross-on-singularity-1-on-1-the-world-is-complicated-elegant-narratives-explaining-everything-are-wrong/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  5. Union Dues - Iron Bars and the Glass Jaw

    “You super folks must think we’re pretty damn foolish, especially us in the law enforcement community.”

    Look at him leaning back with his feet up on the desk. Did he just walk out of Cool Hand Luke? Sheesh, you’d think a sheriff would want to be more dignified. “No sir. You and your brethren are integral to the fabric of society. We of The Union are grateful for your hard work and courage.” I can rattle that sort of crap off all day long.

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  6. Union Dues - Off White Lies

    Leave,” she said calmly, “just go. A recruiting visit was here just three weeks ago and they had no success. The people here don’t much like the Union. Hell, it took me almost a year before any of them would even speak to me, and I didn’t try to razzle-dazzle them.” She quickly scanned the list and produced folders matching each name. “Here,” she said and slid them across the desk, “but they won’t go with you.”

    The Union tries very hard to get all Supers to sign on and become active members, but some simply won’t. This is the first Village, and already The Union is constructing others. Either the mutation rate is rising among the Normals, or we’re getting better at ferreting them out. Either way, we need more space.

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  7. Shannon’s Law

    When the Way to Bordertown closed, I was only four years old, and I was more interested in peeling the skin off my Tickle Me Elmo to expose the robot lurking inside his furry pelt than I was in networking or even plumbing the unknowable mysteries of Elfland. But a lot can change in thirteen years.

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    Tagged with fiction

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  8. Cities: Real and Unreal a discussion of Architecture and Fiction with Jeff Vandermeer, Jeffrey Ford, Geoff Manaugh

    This is a special edition of If You’re Just Joining Us. I had the pleasure of attending a reading and discussion at a Borders in New York a few weeks ago and recorded the event. This is the discussion part of the program, which was hosted by Ron Hogan. The three members of the discussion panel were: Jeff Vandermeer, Jeffrey Ford, and Geoff Manaugh.

    Jeff Vandermeer, who was recently on IFYJJU, had graciously invited me. His website is http://www.jeffvandermeer.com/.

    Jeffrey Ford’s is http://users.rcn.com/delicate/ Geoff Manaugh’s is BLDG BLOG

    The host was Ron Hogan and his site is Beatrice.

    http://www.ifyourejustjoiningus.com/2009/12/11/cities-real-and-unreal-a-discussion-of-architecture-and-fiction-with-jeff-vandermeer-jeffrey-ford-geoff-manaugh/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  9. Part 2 of 2 “Cicero” by John Lord

    "Cicero" by John Lord Reader: Andrew Julow

    The story: Cicero, the greatest statesman of the last days of the Roman Republic, has a life that makes for a great story. He rose from a modestly weathly, but politically weak family to become the consul of Rome without being a general or patrician nobleman. Then, outmaneuvered by his political opponents, he was exiled for proclaiming without trial a sentence of death on the minor members of an attempted coup. He rose again to prominence through the force of his writing, then fell again when he chose to back Pompey against Julius Ceasar in the Roman Civil War. After the murder of Ceasar, Cicero spoke out against Mark Antony, finally submitting to execution after Antony entered a power-sharing agreement with Augustus.

    Lord makes no excuses for giving his opinions about Cicero or any other subject that comes his way. He draws parallels between the Romans and individual politicians of his own time. Although these comparisons were probably enlightening for people reading his words in the 19th century, I had difficulty following some of his references. Lord’s opinionated retelling is entertaining and educational, but I found myself wishing he had spent more time on the details of this fascinating man’s life, and less time pontificating about the lessons we should learn.

    Rating: 7 /10

    The reader: Julow has a serious, earnest baritone that is a good match for history. The only problem is that he doesn’t vary his delivery much, sticking with the same punctuated declarations throughout. Personally, I enjoy a looser style, but Julow’s stiff reading is probably more accurate for the time it was written. Other than this matter of taste, the reading is good and the sound quality excellent.

    Review from the FREE LISTENS blog

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  10. Part 1 of 2 “Cicero” by John Lord

    "Cicero" by John Lord Reader: Andrew Julow

    The story: Cicero, the greatest statesman of the last days of the Roman Republic, has a life that makes for a great story. He rose from a modestly weathly, but politically weak family to become the consul of Rome without being a general or patrician nobleman. Then, outmaneuvered by his political opponents, he was exiled for proclaiming without trial a sentence of death on the minor members of an attempted coup. He rose again to prominence through the force of his writing, then fell again when he chose to back Pompey against Julius Ceasar in the Roman Civil War. After the murder of Ceasar, Cicero spoke out against Mark Antony, finally submitting to execution after Antony entered a power-sharing agreement with Augustus.

    Lord makes no excuses for giving his opinions about Cicero or any other subject that comes his way. He draws parallels between the Romans and individual politicians of his own time. Although these comparisons were probably enlightening for people reading his words in the 19th century, I had difficulty following some of his references. Lord’s opinionated retelling is entertaining and educational, but I found myself wishing he had spent more time on the details of this fascinating man’s life, and less time pontificating about the lessons we should learn.

    Rating: 7 /10

    The reader: Julow has a serious, earnest baritone that is a good match for history. The only problem is that he doesn’t vary his delivery much, sticking with the same punctuated declarations throughout. Personally, I enjoy a looser style, but Julow’s stiff reading is probably more accurate for the time it was written. Other than this matter of taste, the reading is good and the sound quality excellent.

    Review from the FREE LISTENS blog

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

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