BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

Anniemole is the London Underground Tube Diary blogger and Sam Mullens is the director of the London Transport Museum, we met at the Sense and the City exhibition at the museum to talk about how the gadget in your pocket could play a big part in the future of how you get around. Interestingly the exhibition not only promises a hack-day soon, it also provides some beautiful visualisations of how we get around the city.

Nathan Yau is a statistics Phd Student who has written a book called "Visualize This". It’s a great guide for those who may be interested in creating their own visualisations but are not sure where to start.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/outriders/2011/07/visualised_journeys.shtml

Also huffduffed as…

  1. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by psd on July 20th, 2011

  2. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by briansuda on July 21st, 2011

  3. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by adactio on July 21st, 2011

  4. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by kbavier on July 21st, 2011

  5. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by briankuhl on July 24th, 2011

  6. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw on July 26th, 2011

  7. BBC Outriders — Looking at ourselves

    —Huffduffed by tribehut on July 26th, 2011

Possibly related…

  1. The Art of the Underground: 150 Years of Re-designing London | Gresham College

    The London Underground today is one of the world’s largest and busiest urban metros. Exactly 150 years ago, on 9 January 1863, when the inaugural train left Paddington for Farringdon with invited guests, the Metropolitan Railway was hailed as an amazing pioneer. A public service began on the following day and the Daily News announced dramatically that ‘for the first time in the history of the world, men can ride in pleasant carriages, and with considerable comfort, lower down than gas pipes and water pipes…lower than the graveyards’.

    The Victorian steam underground, less than four miles long with just six stations, has developed into a modern electric system covering more than 250 route miles and serving 270 stations. Last year there were over one billion passenger journeys on the Tube, more than the total for the entire UK national rail network, and the numbers keep growing. Londoners have always grumbled about it, but they could not do without it. The Underground keeps London going.

    This talk looks at how this has happened and why the Underground is now the city’s greatest asset, underpinning everything else. Our Tube has shaped the capital and its development over 150 years, and rail transport will be the key to London’s future.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan 5 months ago

  2. BBC Outriders — Histories, stories and current tales

    Jamillah Knowles’s Outriders podcast featuring Andrew Back reporting from a meeting of the Open Source Hardware User Group http://oshug.org hosted by BBC Learning Development.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/outriders/2011/02/histories_stories_and_current.shtml

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  3. BBC Outriders — Histories, stories and current tales

    Jamillah Knowles’s Outriders podcast featuring Andrew Back reporting from a meeting of the Open Source Hardware User Group http://oshug.org hosted by BBC Learning Development.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/outriders/2011/02/histories_stories_and_current.shtml

    —Huffduffed by psd 3 years ago