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Tagged with “reality” (17) activity chart

  1. Ori Inbar on Singularity 1 on 1: Augmented Reality Will Change Every Aspect of Life and Work

    Ori Inbar developed a passion for augmented reality (AR) ever since he realized that it will change every aspect of life and work we can think of. This realization has motivated him to become an industry start-up entrepreneur, a founder of a not-for-profit organization, an event organizer and a recognized speaker on topics related to augmented reality. Thus I was very happy to get him for an interview on Singularity 1 on 1.

    During my conversation with Ori Inbar we cover a variety of interesting topics such as: the story behind his passion and motivation for augmented reality; the past and the present definition of augmented reality; differences between augmented reality, virtual reality and real reality; major applications for AR; the dangers and costs of militarization; Ori’s favorite augmented reality devices; issues of privacy, advertising and big brother; “wearing” vs “not-wearing” and Vernor Vinge‘s Rainbows End; the three laws of augmented reality design; Ogmento and AugmentedReality.org; transhumanism and the technological singularity…

    My favorite quote that I will take away from this conversation with Ori Inbar is: “When you think of any aspect of life or work, augmented reality is completely going to change how we do it.”

    http://www.singularityweblog.com/ori-inbar-on-singularity-1-on-1-augmented-reality-will-change-every-aspect-of-life-and-work/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 11 months ago

  2. To The Best of Our Knowledge: Philip K. Dick

    Nobody blurred the line between his life and his literature more than the legendary science-fiction author, Philip K. Dick. And that’s only fitting since one of the major themes of his fiction is, “What is reality?” This week we take a look at the life and work of the man who’s been described as “one of the most valiant psychological explorers of the twentieth century,” as we commemorate the 30th anniversary of his death.

    http://ttbook.org/book/philip-k-dick

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 2 years ago

  3. How To Save The World, One Video Game At A Time : NPR

    Every week, people across the globe spend 3 billion hours playing video games, but that isn’t enough for Jane McGonigal. She says video games can help solve some of the world’s biggest problems —€” and we really should be playing more.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/04/11/135248010/how-to-save-the-world-one-video-game-at-a-time

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  4. Jane McGonigal: How Video Games Can Make a Better World

    Can problems like poverty and climate change by fixed through games? Visionary game designer Jane McGonigal thinks they can. With more than 174 million gamers in the United States, McGonigal explores how we can save the world through the power of gaming. McGonigal is helping pioneer the fasting-growing genre of games that turns gameplay to achieve socially positive outcomes.

    This program was recorded in collaboration with the Commonwealth Club of California, on January 24, 2011.

    Jane McGonigal is the director of games research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, California. She has created and deployed games and missions in more than 30 countries on six continents. She specializes in games that help gamers enjoy their real lives more — and games that challenge players to tackle real-world problems, through planetary-scale collaboration.

    McGonigal is the author of the newly released book, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  5. Brian Greene: A Physicist Explains ‘The Hidden Reality’ Of Parallel Universes : NPR

    It is possible that there are many other universes that exist parallel to our universe. Theoretical physicist Brian Greene, author of The Elegant Universe, explains how that’s possible in the new book, The Hidden Reality.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/24/132932268/a-physicist-explains-why-parallel-universes-may-exist?&sc=tumblr

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  6. Computerworld Techcast: Ray Kurzweil, Part I: The future of computing

    In this episode of the Computerworld Techcast, Ray Kurzweil, author of The Singularity Is Near, explains the impact of the exponential growth of processing power in computers. In the interview, Kurzweil says that computing advances will go beyond making computers smaller and more powerful — they will eventually lead to pervasive computing, augmented reality, and vastly longer lifespans.Duration: 10 minutes

    http://blogs.computerworld.com/computerworld_techcast_ray_kurzweil_part_i_the_future_of_computing

    —Huffduffed by briansuda 3 years ago

  7. Sean M Carroll on Origin of the Universe & the Arrow of Time

    Sean M. Carroll of CalTech discusses how the direction of the arrow of time was defined by the Big Bang. He also speculates about what might have come before the Big Bang. The lecture is entitled The Origin of the Universe & the Arrow of Time.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

  8. PRI Selected Shorts: What Is Real?

    First, James Lasdun’s "A Woman at the Window," is a cautionary tale for men who want to rescue damsels in distress. The reader is Leenya Rideout. Next, the late Ukranian-born writer Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky has invented a substance that expands apartments, and wreaks havoc on the life of his main character. "This American Life" commentator David Rakoff provides the nicely melancholy reading. Finally, Leenya Rideout returns for "Flight," in which a scatter-brained, lonely woman "borrows" her addled neighbor.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

  9. To The Best of Our Knowledge: The Universe

    Leonard Mlodinow and co-author Stephen Hawking say that you can explain the existence of everything without requiring God. Charles Yu’s novel details some of the perils of existence in multiple time streams. James Kakalios says that some of the early quantum physicists were inspired by science fiction. John Polkinghorne is the author of many books on the subject of bridging the gap between science and religion. Michio Kaku tells us exactly why the impossible just takes a little longer.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

  10. Joe Lamantia: New Frontiers for Experience Design

    From http://www.iakonferenz.org/de/2010/audio.html

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

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