Tagged with “books” (7) activity chart

  1. What Is the Shape of the Future Book?

    We will always debate: the quality of the paper, the pixel density of the display; the cloth used on covers, the interface for highlighting; location by page, location by paragraph.

    This is not what matters. Surface is secondary.

    What are the core systems comprising the future book? What are the tools that need to be built?

    As designers we will need to provide the scaffolding for these systems. The interfaces for these tools. Not just as surface, but holistically—understanding the shifting of emotional space, the import of the artifact, the evocation of a souvenir, digitally.

    How will we surface the myriad data just below the words of digital books in organic, clean and deliberately designed ways? How will we shape the future book?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/craig-mod

    Craig Mod is a writer, designer and publisher concerned with the future of books, publishing, and storytelling. He lives in a tiny Bay Area village in the California full of dreamers, endless yogurt, and trees that let loose money when shaken just so. His writing appears mainly on his website, but has also appeared in the New Scientist, The New York Times, and A List Apart. He works as a designer for Flipboard.

    —Huffduffed by PeteWilliams

  2. 43F Podcast: The Perfect Apostrophe | 43 Folders

    The Perfect Apostrophe - In which I undertake writing a book on productivity. (10:50)

    —Huffduffed by adewale

  3. EPISODE #34: CRAIG MOD

    Craig Mod joins Jeffrey Zeldman and Dan Benjamin to discuss the decision to jump from freelance work to startup work, Craig’s experience traveling and writing the GF1 Fieldtest, how travel affects the work you do, and the multifaceted challenges and future of web publishing.

    —Huffduffed by andybudd

  4. Dragon Page: Cover to Cover, George R.R. Martin

    Dragon Page Cover to Cover Interview of George R.R. Martin 4-28-2010

    download

    Tagged with books

    —Huffduffed by adewale

  5. The Guardian Books Podcast: Looking ahead in science fiction

    Science fiction is the marmite of literature – people tend to love it or hate it. Yet no one could deny that it has produced many of the great myths of our age, from Frankenstein’s monster to William Gibson’s cyber-reality.

    SF blogger Damien Walter joins our panellists to discuss where it is now, and why we should all tune in to a genre that can be satirical, prophetic, political and plain good fun, often all at the same time. He also outlines some of the titles to look out for in 2010.

    We also look at John Wyndham’s previously unpublished novel, Plan for Chaos, and interview China Miéville, rising star of the "new weird".

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2010/jan/14/science-fiction-books-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adewale

  6. New Think for Old Publishers

    This is not a discussion of whether ebooks are killing treebooks, or whether it’s possible to get cozy with an Amazon Kindle. It’s about how participatory culture and the online world interact with good old book publishing. Clay Shirky, author of Here Comes Everybody, Deborah Schultz and fellow panelists will share with the audience a variety of perspectives on what’s going right and what’s going wrong in publishing, assess success of recent forays into marketing digitally, digital publishing, and what books and blogs have to gain from one another. Penguin Group (USA), which houses some 40 plus imprints and publishes an extremely broad variety of physical and digital products, everything from William Gibson’s first ebook in the 90’s to Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food to Charlaine Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse novels (the source for HBO’s True Blood) is deeply involved in exploring ways that old and new media might better collaborate. Audience members are invited to speak up about what they think book publishers could / should be doing to better provide relevant information and content to blogs, websites, and online communities. Come tell old media what you want and how you want it.

    From http://2009.sxsw.com/taxonomy/term/44

    —Huffduffed by adewale

  7. Knowledge in the Age of Abundance - David Weinberger

    LITA Forum 2009 Keynote

    Nothing has been more important to our culture than knowledge. We’ve even used it to define who we are: We are the rational animals, the animals that can know their world. But our traditional Western notion of knowledge has been premised on an implicit scarcity: of access to publishers, access to books, and a scarcity of knowledge itself. Our new connected age is one of abundance. This is bringing a change in the nature, shape, value and role of knowledge itself.

    From http://litablog.org/2009/10/forum-2009-keynote-audio-david-weinberger/

    —Huffduffed by adewale