ideasatrandom / collective / tags / tradition

Tagged with “tradition” (3) activity chart

  1. The Fat Duck | Heston Blumenthal | Cooking Statement

    ‘Molecular gastronomy’ was coined in the 1991 as a suitably serious-sounding term that would help pave the way for a conference on culinary science.

    Since then, however, it has become a convenient, catch-all-phrase to describe science-driven cooking. It explains little and misleads a lot.

    In 2006 Heston was involved in producing a statement to explain how his motivations and intentions weren’t confined to the sphere of molecular gastronomy.

    ONE Three basic principles guide our cooking: excellence, openness, and integrity.
    We are motivated above all by an aspiration to excellence. We wish to work with ingredients of the finest quality, and to realize the full potential of the food we choose to prepare, whether it is a single shot of espresso or a multicourse tasting menu.

    TWO Our cooking values tradition, builds on it, and along with tradition is part of the ongoing evolution of our craft.
    The world’s culinary traditions are collective, cumulative inventions, a heritage created by hundreds of generations of cooks. Tradition is the base which all cooks who aspire to excellence must know and master. Our open approach builds on the best that tradition has to offer.

    THREE We embrace innovation - new ingredients, techniques, appliances, information, and ideas - whenever it can make a real contribution to our cooking.
    We do not pursue novelty for its own sake. We may use modern thickeners, sugar substitutes, enzymes, liquid nitrogen, sous-vide, dehydration, and other nontraditional means, but these do not define our cooking. They are a few of the many tools that we are fortunate to have available as we strive to make delicious and stimulating dishes.

    FOUR We believe that cooking can affect people in profound ways, and that a spirit of collaboration and sharing is essential to true progress in developing this potential.
    The act of eating engages all the senses as well as the mind. Preparing and serving food could therefore be the most complex and comprehensive of the performing arts. To explore the full expressive potential of food and cooking, we collaborate with scientists, from food chemists to psychologists, with artisans and artists (from all walks of the performing arts), architects, designers, industrial engineers. We also believe in the importance of collaboration and generosity among cooks: a readiness to share ideas and information, together with full acknowledgment of those who invent new techniques and dishes.

    http://www.thefatduck.co.uk/Heston-Blumenthal/Cooking-Statement/

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  2. The Byrds’ Roger McGuinn Works To Preserve Folk Music : NPR

    Singer-guitarist Roger McGuinn, best known as leader of The Byrds, is a folk-rock pioneer. Since the group disbanded, McGuinn has pursued a solo career, and also created the Folk Den Project, an online database of traditional songs he records.

    https://www.npr.org/2012/04/18/150890766/the-byrds-roger-mcguinn-works-to-preserve-folk?ft=1&f=5

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  3. The Night Singers of Brighton

    Across the Atlantic in a tiny village in Newfoundland, residents sing a New Year’s carol brought from Europe with the first English and Irish settlers, and handed down through centuries in the oral tradition. For generations villagers have walked from house to house, entered darkened kitchens after midnight, and have sung the carol as occupants listened in the darkness. Producer Chris Brookes tracked down the village carolers and follows them on their rounds as they sing their medieval melodies.

    For futher info on the village: http://ca.epodunk.com/profiles/newfoundland-and-labrador/brighton/2000303.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 years ago