iamdanw / tags / books

Tagged with “books” (9) activity chart

  1. Brewster Kahle: Universal Access to All Knowledge — The Long Now

    Universal access to all knowledge, Kahle declared, will be one of humanity’s greatest achievements. We are already well on the way. "We’re building the Library of Alexandria, version 2. We can one-up the Greeks!"

    Start with what the ancient library had—-books. The Internet Library already has 3 million books digitized. With its Scribe Book Scanner robots—-29 of them around the world—-they’re churning out a thousand books a day digitized into every handy ebook format, including robot-audio for the blind and dyslexic. Even modern heavily copyrighted books are being made available for free as lending-library ebooks you can borrow from physical libraries—-100,000 such books so far. (Kahle announced that every citizen of California is now eligible to borrow online from the Oakland Library’s "ePort.")

    As for music, Kahle noted that the 2-3 million records ever made are intensely litigated, so the Internet Archive offered music makers free unlimited storage of their works forever, and the music poured in. The Archive audio collection has 100,000 concerts so far (including all the Grateful Dead) and a million recordings, with three new bands every day uploading.

    Moving images. The 150,000 commercial movies ever made are tightly controlled, but 2 million other films are readily available and fascinating—-600,000 of them are accessible in the Archive already. In the year 2000, without asking anyone’s permission, the Internet Archive started recording 20 channels of TV all day, every day. When 9/11 happened, they were able to assemble an online archive of TV news coverage all that week from around the world ("TV comes with a point of view!") and make it available just a month after the event on Oct. 11, 2001.

    The Web itself. When the Internet Archive began in 1996, there were just 30 million web pages. Now the Wayback Machine copies every page of every website every two months and makes them time-searchable from its 6-petabyte database of 150 billion pages. It has 500,000 users a day making 6,000 queries a second.

    "What is the Library of Alexandria most famous for?" Kahle asked. "For burning! It’s all gone!" To maintain digital archives, they have to be used and loved, with every byte migrated forward into new media evey five years. For backup, the whole Internet Archive is mirrored at the new Bibliotheca Alexadrina in Egypt and in Amsterdam. ("So our earthquake zone archive is backed up in the turbulent Mideast and a flood zone. I won’t sleep well until there are five or six backup sites.")

    Speaking of institutional longevity, Kahle noted during the Q & A that nonprofits demonstrably live much longer than businesses. It might be it’s because they have softer edges, he surmised, or that they’re free of the grow-or-die demands of commercial competition. Whatever the cause, they are proliferating.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02011/nov/30/universal-access-all-knowledge/

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 2 years ago

  2. What Is the Shape of the Future Book?

    We will always debate: the quality of the paper, the pixel density of the display; the cloth used on covers, the interface for highlighting; location by page, location by paragraph.

    This is not what matters. Surface is secondary.

    What are the core systems comprising the future book? What are the tools that need to be built?

    As designers we will need to provide the scaffolding for these systems. The interfaces for these tools. Not just as surface, but holistically—understanding the shifting of emotional space, the import of the artifact, the evocation of a souvenir, digitally.

    How will we surface the myriad data just below the words of digital books in organic, clean and deliberately designed ways? How will we shape the future book?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/craig-mod

    Craig Mod is a writer, designer and publisher concerned with the future of books, publishing, and storytelling. He lives in a tiny Bay Area village in the California full of dreamers, endless yogurt, and trees that let loose money when shaken just so. His writing appears mainly on his website, but has also appeared in the New Scientist, The New York Times, and A List Apart. He works as a designer for Flipboard.

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 2 years ago

  3. Short story podcast: William Boyd reads ‘My Dream of Flying to Wake Island’ by JG Ballard | Books | guardian.co.uk

    William Boyd reads a characteristic JG Ballard story, dominated by image and symbol rather than character and narrative, ‘My Dream of Flying to Wake Island’

    In the short history of the short story – not much longer than 150 years – very few writers have completely redefined the form. Chekhov, pre-eminently, but also Hemingway and Borges. JG ­Ballard has to be added to this exclusive list, in my opinion. Ballard’s models for his haunting stories are closer to art and music, it seems to me, than to literature. These are fictions inspired by the paintings of De Chirico and Max Ernst, which summon up the mesmerising ostinatos of Philip Glass and Steve Reich. Character and narrative are secondary – image and symbol dominate with a surreal and hypnotic intensity, and the language reflects this. Ballardian tropes – empty swimming pools, abandoned resorts, psychotic astronauts, damaged doctors, the alluring nihilism of consumer society and so forth – are unmistakably and uniquely his. "My Dream of Flying to Wake ­Island" is a true Ballardian classic.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2010/dec/07/william-boyd-gallard-dream-wake-island

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 2 years ago

  4. Sci-Fi’s Cory Doctorow Separates Self-Publishing Fact From Fiction : All Tech Considered : NPR

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 3 years ago

  5. We’ll Always Have Zeppelins — The Incomparable

    Climb in your Zeppelin, grab a self-burning book, and prepare for the first Incomparable Podcast, in which we discuss "The City and The City," "The Windup Girl," "For The Win," and more. Plus we mispronounce the names of writers.

    The Incomparable Participants: Glenn Fleishman, Scott McNulty, Dan Moren, and Jason Snell. The Incomparable Theme Song composed by Christopher Breen.

    Prominently mentioned in this Incomparable episode:

    • "The City & The City" by China Miéville
    • "The Windup Girl" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "For the Win" by Cory Doctorow

    Also mentioned:

    • "Perdido Street Station" by China Miéville
    • "Little Brother" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Boneshaker" by Cherie Priest
    • "The Gone-Away World" by Nick Harkaway
    • "Ship Breaker" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "Tongues of Serpents" by Naomi Novik
    • "The Dream of Perpetual Motion" by Dexter Palmer
    • "A Storm of Swords" by George R.R. Martin
    • "Oryx and Crake" by Margaret Atwood
    • "The Yiddish Policeman’s Union" by Michael Chabon
    • "Bitter Seeds" by Ian Tregillis
    • "The Adamantine Palace" by Stephen Deas
    • "Shades of Grey" by Jasper Fforde
    • "Fables" by Bill Willingham and Lan Medina

    http://www.theincomparable.com/2010/08/1-well-always-have-zeppelins-1.html

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 3 years ago

  6. The Book of Lost Books, by Stuart Kelly - West Port Book Festival

    In The Book of Lost Books, Stuart Kelly reaches into the recesses of history to trace books, great or perhaps otherwise, that have been lost, stolen, incinerated, abandoned or mutilated through the ages. In a sparkling event, he reads extracts which deal his own fascination with lost books, Agathon, the Greek tragic poet whose works are all lost, the lost adventures of Sir Richard Burton, and many intriguing literary titbits.

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 3 years ago

  7. Maps, Books, Spimes, Paper: Post-Digital Media Design

    The Internet is situated in the real world, and interesting experiences have to blend physical and digital. Mixing new technology - Arduinos, GPS, RFID, QRcodes - and old (web, paper), we present examples of the recently possible future, and the lessons we’ve learnt. And we’ll make something along the way.

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 4 years ago

  8. The Guardian Books Podcast: Looking ahead in science fiction

    Science fiction is the marmite of literature – people tend to love it or hate it. Yet no one could deny that it has produced many of the great myths of our age, from Frankenstein’s monster to William Gibson’s cyber-reality.

    SF blogger Damien Walter joins our panellists to discuss where it is now, and why we should all tune in to a genre that can be satirical, prophetic, political and plain good fun, often all at the same time. He also outlines some of the titles to look out for in 2010.

    We also look at John Wyndham’s previously unpublished novel, Plan for Chaos, and interview China Miéville, rising star of the "new weird".

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2010/jan/14/science-fiction-books-podcast

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 4 years ago

  9. Knowledge in the Age of Abundance - David Weinberger

    LITA Forum 2009 Keynote

    Nothing has been more important to our culture than knowledge. We’ve even used it to define who we are: We are the rational animals, the animals that can know their world. But our traditional Western notion of knowledge has been premised on an implicit scarcity: of access to publishers, access to books, and a scarcity of knowledge itself. Our new connected age is one of abundance. This is bringing a change in the nature, shape, value and role of knowledge itself.

    From http://litablog.org/2009/10/forum-2009-keynote-audio-david-weinberger/

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw 4 years ago