iamdanw / collective / tags / design

Tagged with “design” (438) activity chart

  1. The Web Ahead #80: The Complexity and the Humanity with Trent Walton

    Trent Walton joins Jen Simmons to tell tales of working on the microsoft.com homepage and other big projects — sharing what can go right and what can go wrong.

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/80

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. RWD Podcast Episode #16: John Allsopp — Responsive Web Design

    John Allsopp talks about the web being more than just the device we’re accessing it upon. We aren’t building for a device or a browser, it’s not mobile or content first…. think user first.

    http://responsivedesign.is/articles/rwd-podcast-episode-16-john-allsopp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Inquisitive #1: Having Principles, with Marco Arment - Relay FM

    This week Myke is joined by Marco Arment. They talk about the development and testing process of Overcast, Marco’s take on opinionated design, his changing place in the podcast industry and his feelings about releasing the app to the world.

    http://relay.fm/inquisitive/1

    —Huffduffed by adewale

  4. Responsive Web Design Episode #1: The Boston Globe

    When you really start to think about it, responsive web design is just technology. It’s just web design. But all the ways that it causes all these other conversations to happen is really fascinating.

    http://responsivewebdesign.com/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. RSA - The Frugal Innovator

    Apologies for the patchy sound on this video. We had some technical issues which we were unable to fix before the start of this recording.

    Leading authority on creativity and innovation, Charles Leadbeater visits the RSA to present a powerful new model of social change for an age of austerity and ecological restraint – “frugal innovation”.

    In a world of rising population, exploding demand among consumers on modest incomes and global pressure to minimise environmental damage, a wave of innovators and entrepreneurs from developing countries have shown that extraordinary technical and social advances can be achieved, despite scarce capital and resources.

    Based around four key design principles – “lean, simple, clean, social” - frugal innovation promises to offer radical solutions to social challenges faced by organisations, individuals and communities worldwide.

    Speaker: Charles Leadbeater, writer and adviser on innovation and creativity.

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  6. RWD Podcast Episode #15 : Jeremy Keith — Responsive Web Design

    Jeremy Keith talks about writing, progressive enhancement and how we can take a new basic approach to build our sites.

    http://responsivedesign.is/articles/rwd-podcast-episode-15-jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. 99% Invisible - 125- Duplitecture

    The best knock-offs in the world are in China. There are plenty of fake designer handbags and Rolexes, but China’s knock-offs go way beyond fashion. There are knock-off Apple stores that look so much like the real thing, some employees believe they are working in real Apple stores. And then there are entire knock-off cities.

    http://99percentinvisible.prx.org/2014/07/29/125-duplitecture/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Dan Saffer – Big Considerations from Microinteractions » UIE Brain Sparks

    User Experience is really all about delighting your users. You want them to accomplish tasks with ease and not encounter any roadblocks that are a direct result of your design. Many of the delightful things about an app or interface go unnoticed because they are the tiniest of features. These microinteractions can set the tone for your users and dictate the feel and performance of your design.

    Dan Saffer is an expert on microinteractions. In fact, he wrote the book on it. He says that microinteractions essentially operate based on triggers, rules, feedback, loops, and modes. For example, when you engage a scrollbar, how fast does it scroll? Or when you click a volume up button, what percent increase is each click?

    Just think of a car. In the broadest terms, a car is a car. But the styling of the interior, leather seats, placement of cupholders, and how the in car stereo system works all help differentiate one car from another. These are often subtle differences, but as with microinteractions, these small differences are crucial to the overall feel and experience.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/08/01/dan-saffer-big-considerations-from-microinteractions/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Design for how the world should work

    As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s important to start designing for physical and intentional interactions with interfaces to supplement the passive, data-gathering interactions — designing smart devices that service us in the background, but upon which we also can exert our will.

    In this episode, Josh Clark (in an interview) and Tim O’Reilly (in a keynote) both address the importance of designing for contextual awareness and physical interaction. Clark stresses that we’re not facing a challenge of technology, but a challenge of imagination. O’Reilly argues that we’re not paying enough attention to the aspects of people and time in designing the Internet of Things, and that the entire system in which we operate is the user interface — as we design this new world, we must think about user needs first.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Stephen Anderson – Deciphering Data through Design

    Understanding problems are common when trying to visualize data. Designing a layout to effectively communicate complex or even simple data can be a challenge. If the visualization isn’t immediately apparent to a user, it requires a level of understanding to get the most out of their experience.

    Stephen Anderson has been working to unlock these understanding problems. He says that oftentimes really simple changes can have dramatic effects on a user’s ability to interpret data. He cites the many examples of designers taking stabs at airline boarding pass redesigns and the evolution Target’s Pharmacy prescription bottle went through. Presenting the information in a much clearer way reduces the cognitive barrier.

    In this podcast with Jared Spool, Stephen outlines what he calls the 7 Problems of Understanding. These range from problems of comprehension to problems of discovery and more. Each of these problems is usually brought about by a design or display decision. Looking further at these issues, simple changes can greatly increase the experience for users.

    Stephen will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshop choices at the User Interface 19 Conference, October 27-29 in Boston. For more information on the workshops and the conference, visit uiconf.com.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

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