The Future of Privacy in Social Media

http://research.microsoft.com/apps/video/dl.aspx?id=162737

Today’s youth are sharing a tremendous amount of information through social media. They share to connect, but in connecting, they leave large traces of their interactions for unexpected audiences to view. Those who care about privacy are scratching their heads, trying to make sense of why youth share and what it means for the future of privacy. danah will discuss how youth understand privacy in a networked world. She will describe youths’ attitudes, practices, and strategies before discussing the implications for companies and the government.

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  1. The Future of Privacy in Social Media

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